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NOTES AND QUERIES: 



of Into'Communicatfon 



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LITERARY MEN, GENERAL READERS, ETC. 



When found, make a note of." CAPTAIN CUTTLE. 



THIRD SERIES. VOLUME THIRD. 
JANUARY JUNE, 1863. 






LONDON: 

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1863. 






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NOTES AND QUERIES: 

A MEDIUM OF INTER-COMMUNICATION 
TOR 

LITERARY MEN, GENERAL READERS, ETC. 

"When found, make a note of." CAPTAIN CUTTLE. 



No. 53.] 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 



LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARYS, 1863. 



CONTENTS. NO. 53. 

NOTES : The Registers of the Stationers' Company, 1. 
Inedited Letter of Lord and Lady Ruthven, 3 Archbishop 
Laud and his Sepulchre, /&. Carfax, Oxford, 4 Cuckoo- 
gun, Ib. 

MINOR NOTES : Tradition through few Links GroAyth of 
Bogs To Colt Latin Elegy by Praed : Greek : English, 5. 

QUERIES -.Westminster Sanctuary, 5 Architectural So- 
cieties Prince Arthur Cave House School " Czarina,' 
"Czarine" Don Carlos Extraordinary Christmas Ca- 
rol Sale of Davis's Eooks, January, 1756 Graining, In- 
vention of Hewett Family Pictorial History : Junius 
Henry Deux Ware King's Bench in Westminster Hall, 
and Old Carved Statues Legend of Methuselah Wil- 
liam Long, Esq. Nicean Barks Order of St. John of 
Jerusalem Peerage Forfeited Processional Cross found 
in Ireland " Sellenger's Round," &c. N. Scarlett, &c., 6. 

QUERIES WITH ANSWERS: "Stonewall" Jackson Capt. 
Richard Pierce Sir Thomas Wyatt Jenner of Wilts, 
Worcestershire, and Gloucestershire Dr. Arne's " There 
was an Old Woman " Bryan Faussett, 1755 " Historical 
Collections," &c. Peter Bouis, 9. 

REPLIES: John Hampden, 11 Yorkshire Sufferers in 
1745, 13 Refugees from the Low Countries, 14 The Hen - 
nings and William of Wykeham Revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes "History of Kilmallock" Thomas Barlow, Bishop 
of Lincoln Old French Terms Wildfire St. Leger of 
Trunkwell Knight of the Carpet Stature of a Man from 
his SkeletonForeign Money, &c. Wyndham and Wind- 
ham Homeric Theory A Two-headed Man Forthink : 
Chaucer Houghton Family of Jamaica Lawrence Fa- 
mily George Chapman Hazel Eyes, &c., 14. . 



THE REGISTERS OF THE STATIONERS' 

COMPANY. 

(Continued from 3 rd S. ii. p. 463.) 
26 Oct. [1594]. Thomas Gosson. Joseph 
Hunt. Entred for their copie, under thandes of 
Mr. Warden Binge, a ballad intituled The coolinge 

of Curst Kate vj d . 

[This \s an entry which, in reference to Shakespeare's 
' Curst Kate," seems to have been passed over by those 
who have hitherto consulted the Stationers' Registers: 
its importance cannot be doubted, although it probably 
relates to a ballad founded on the old comedy, The Taming 
of a. Shrew, which was first printed in the year 1594, 4to. 
The only copy of that impression is in the "Library of the 
Duke of Devonshire, who purchased it by the hands of 
the present writer for 951. It may originally have been 
called " The Cooling of Curst Kate."] 

John Danter. Entred for his copie, &c. a ballad 
entitled Jone's Ale is newe v j. 

[An extremely popular ballad, and a tune to which 
songs, &c. were often afterwards written, when it usually 
bore the name of The Jovial Tinker. The words are 
preserved among Douce's Ballads at Oxford, where it 
bears the following title: Joane's Ale is New ; or a new 
merry meddly, showing the power, strength, operation, and 
MTfctt that remaines in good Ale, which is accounted the 
mother-drink of England. It begins " There was a jovial 

1 new boys "? **** "^ ^ bUrden> " A d J aDe ' S ^ le is 

Edward White. Entred for his copie, &c. theis 
twoo ballads msuinge, viz. : 



The poore's lamentation for the price of come, 
with God's justice shewed uppon a cruelle 

horder of corne vj d . 

Another of The Devill of Devonshire, and 

Wilhin of the West, his son .... vj d . 

Johane Butler, widow. Entred for hir copie, 

&c. a booke entituled A true report of the Bap- 

tisme of the Prince of Scotland vj d . 

[Afterwards known here as Prince Henry.] 

25 Oct. John Danter. Entred for his copie, 
&c. a book intituled The Terror of the night, or 
an apparision of dreames vj d . 

[By Thomas Nash. The true title is, The Terrors of 
the Night, or a Discourse of Apparitions. It was " printed 
by John Danter for William Jones," 1594, 4to. It is a 
tract written by Nash when he was ill, and in great 
poverty. The most interesting passage in it relates to 
" Robin Goodfellowes, Elfes, Fairies, and Hobgoblins," 
who, the author says, had displaced the " Fawnes, Satyres, 
Dryades, and Hamadryades " of Greece. It is very rare. ] 

Johane Butler, widowe. Entred for her copie, 
&c. a ballad intituled The Tryumphant and princelie 
newe ballad, declaringe the royaltie and magnificence 
performed at the Baptisinge of the prince of Scot- 
land. 

Ultimo Octobris. Thomas Myllington. Entred 
for his copie, &c. a ballad intituled The poore 
widowe of Copthall in Kent, and her seaven children, 
hoiv wonderfullie the Lord fed them in their wante. 

YJ-. 

[Clearly connected with the then high price of corn.] 

Tho. Myllington. Entred for his copie, &c. 
another ballad, intituled A Triumphant newe 
successe, which our Englishe men had in Britanye, 
with the yeildinge and takinge of the towne and 
castell of Morlesse in Sept. 1594 .... vj d . 

5 to die Novembris. John Danter. Entred for 
his copie, &c. a ballad wherein is shewed A hnache 
hoive to knowe an honest man from a knave . vj d . 

[A comedy called A Knack to know a Knave was 
entered on 7th Jan. 1593-4, and here we see a counter- 
part to it entered as " a ballad." It was not in fact pub- 
lished until 1596, and is a very inferior production. It 
was, doubtless, written in consequence of the great run 
at the theatre, of A Knack to know a Knave, immediately 
after it had been brought out ; but the title-page of th" 
Knack to know an Honest Man only professes that it had 
been acted " several times." A Knack to know a Knave 
was printed in 1594, and has been reprinted by the Rox- 
burghe Club.] 

John Danter. Entred alsoe for his copie, &c. a 
ballad entituled The storye of Tamburlayrie the 
greate SfC vj d . 

[Here, again, a play is termed " a ballad." It was of 
course Marlowe's performance, which had been first printed 
four years earlier. The Rev. Mr. Dyce supposes that 
the above was the entry of a ballad founded upon the 
drama, but he did not know how often in the Stat. Re- 
gisters plays were denominated ballads. See the very 
preceding entry, where A Knack to know an honest Man 
is termed " a ballad."] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAN. 3, 'G3. 



15 Nov. Edward White. Entred for bis copie, 
&c. a ballad of The triumphes at the tilte and thanks- 
gyoinge, the xvijA of November 1594, for her 
'majesties xxxvij year ex Reigne .... . yj d . 

Die Veneris xv Novembris. Edward White. 
Entred for his copie, &c. a ballad entituled The 
Unthriftes Adiew to Jones ale is newe . . vj d . 

[The popularity of Joan's Ale is new seems almost 
immediately to have produced imitations of it, to the 
same tune. The ballad is unknown to us.] 

Edward White. Entred for his copie, &c. 
another ballad, intituled A most joyfull newe 
ballad shewinge the happines of England for her 
ma tiet blessed reigne, and the subjectes joy for the 
same ............. vj d . 

xix die November. Willm. Ponsonby. Entred 
for his copie, under thandes of the Wardens, a 
booke intituled Amoretti and Epithalamion. 
Written not long since by Edmund Spencer . vj d . 

[In the writer's Life of Spenser, 1862, p. cxii. it is 
stated, by mistake, that the above entry belongs to 
1595, and not to 1594. Spenser's Amorette -e. were pub- 
lished with the date of 1595, but the above memorandum 
was, of course, inserted in the Registers in anticipation.] 

John Wolf. Entred for his copie, &c. a booke 
intituled Vincentio Saviolo his practise . . vj d . 

[I.e. " his practise " of fencing. It came out, in two 
books, with the date of 1595. This is the work to which 
Touchstone alludes in As you like it, and particularly 
to that part of it which treats " of the Diversitie of 
Lies" " lies certain," " lies conditional," " lies in gene- 
ral," &c. It was dedicated to the Earl of Essex as " the 
English Achilles."] 

xxj Novemb. Edward Aide. Entred for his 
copie, &c. a booke intituled A myrror of mans 
miseries, or a Sommary of the Jirste parte of the 
Resolution ............ vj d . 

[This is to be added to the number of Mirrors pub- 
lished of old. Churchyard published The Mirror of 
Man and Manners of Men in 1594, but it is probable 
that some other work was intended by this entry. We 
never saw any such.] 

Richard Jones. Entred for his copie, &c. a 
booke intituled The fisherman's tale, conteyninge 
the storye of Cassander, a gretian knight . . vj d . 

[By Francis Sabie: the second part, Flora's For- 
tune, is not here mentioned, but they were published 
together by Richard Jones with the date of 1595, 4to. 
Few books can be more rare.] 

29 Nov. Wai. Ponsonby. Entred for his copie, 
&c. a booke intituled a Treatize in commendation 
of Poetrie, or defence of poesy. Written by Sir 
Phillip Sidney .......... vj d . 

[Published in 1595, 4to, with four introductory Son- 
nets by Henry Constable. The main difference between 
this and later impressions is, that some of the names are 
given at length in the 4to. It is included in the folio, 
1598.] 

2 December. Richard Feild. Entred for his 
&c. a booke intituled Thoma Campiane 
, f ..... . vi d . 



Poema 



[Probably a Latin poem by Thomas Campion, or Cam - 
pian, who afterwards attained considerable celebrity as 
an English poet, as well as a musical composer. His 
works are very scarce, and we only know of a single copy 
of his Two Boohes of Ai/res, n. d., published soon after 
1GOO. On account of its rarity, we may quote from it the 
following two stanzas of a charming love-song: 

"Sweet, afford me then your sight, 
That surveying all your lookea, 
Endlesse volumes I may write, 

And fill the world with envyed bookes ; 
" Which when after ages view. 

And shall wonder and despaire, 
Women, to find a man so true, 

Or men a woman halfe so faire! " 
The writer is about to print a new selection from the 
graceful and elegant productions of our early musical 
composers.] 

iiij to die Dec. Edward White. Entred for his 
copie, &c. a ballad entituled A sorroivfull songc 
made uppon the valiant Soaldiour, S r Martin Fro- 
bisher, who vws slaijne neere brest, in Fraunce, in 
November last vj d . 

[Thomas Churchyard in 1578 wrote a Prayse and Reporte 
of Frobisher's Voyage, and he may have been the author 
of the Sorrowful Song on his death, but we are not aware 
that it has survived. It appears by the Stationers' Re- 
gisters that on 1 Nov. 1578, John Charlwood was fined 5s. 
for printing an account of " Fourboyser's Voyage without 
licence." Chalmers {Biog. Diet, xv. 142), states that 
Frobisher was buried at Plymouth, but the Register of 
Deaths at Cripplegate, under date 14 Jan. 1594, has this 
record : " Buried. S r Martyn Furbisher, knight." Was 
the body removed thither, or does the register only re- 
cord the da} r of Furbisher's burial elsewhere.] 

John Danter. Entred for his copie, &c. a 
booke entituled The historic of Gargantua, fyc. 

vj d . 

6 Dec. John Danter. Entred for his copie, 
&c. a ballad intituled White's lamentation, with 
his owne hande, made in the dungeon (it Newgate, 
the night before his death vj d . 

[We find no trace in Stow or Camden of White's 
crime.] 

Thorns Gosson. W m Blackwell. Entred for 
their copie, &c. a ballad intituled The wofutt la- 
mentation of Richard Banes, executed at Tybornc 
the 6 of December, 1594 vj d . 

[The name only of this criminal seems to be recorded.") 

xx die Decembris. Adam Islip. Entred to 
him for his copie, &c. Chawcers worses, by^the 
consent of the wardens, and also by the appoint- 
ment of Abell Jeffes, to whom this copie was first 
entred vj d . 

[This is well known as Speght's edition of Chaucer, 
but though thus entered in Dec. 1594, it was not pub- 
lished until 1598 and again in 1G02. Like other and earlier 
impressions, it contains various pieces not by Chaucer.] 

xxviij die Decembr. Thoms Millingtoo. 
Entred unto him for his copie, &c. a ballad en- 
tytuled An excellent newe ballad, declaringe the 



8"* S. III. JAN. 8,.'6&] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



monstrous dbuce in apparell, and tlie intollerom 

pride nowe-a-daies used, Sfc vj . 

[This, we believe, to have been the registration of 
Stephen' Gosson's poetical and abusive Satire against the 
excess, &c. in the apparel of women. When published, 
it was called Pleasant Quippes for upstart newfangled 
Gentlewomen, Sfc., containing a pleasant Invective against 
the fantastical foreigne Toycs dnylie used in Women's Ap- 
parell. It was first printed in 1595, and again in 1596, 
but in neither case by Millington : perhaps he did not 
like the responsibility. It was castrated, reprinted, and 
finally suppressed by the Percy Society in 1841 ; but the 
writer of the present notice is about to re-produce it 
entire, as a curious, though somewhat broad picture of 
the manners of the time, by a clergyman, the ancient 
enemy of theatrical performances.] 

J. PAYNB COLLIER. 



INEDITED LETTER OF LORD AND LADY 
RUTHVEN. 

The mystery in which that great historical 
problem, the Gowrie Conspiracy, is still involved, 
and the sympathy which must always be felt for 
the unhappy family whose downfall dates from 
that event, gives peculiar interest to every frag- 
ment which serves to throw a gleam of light over 
the obscurity in which the later history of the 
Kuthvens is involved. 

The readers of " K & Q," will therefore, I am 
sure, share with me in acknowledging their obli- 
gations to the Noble Lord, by whose courtesy I 
am enabled to lay before them the following Peti- 
tion from a copy in his possession. Nor is the 
document less interesting from the distinctness 
with which the writer alludes to the fate of his 
grandfather, " John, Earle of Gowrey, whose life, 
honour, and estate, were sacrificed to the Courte 
pretence of a Conspiracy." 

" To his highnesse Oliver Lord Protector of the Common- 
wealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland, &c. 

" The Humble Petition of Patrick Lord Ruthen, and 
Dame Sarah his Wife, 

" Sheweth, 

" That the Petitioner is Grandsonne to John Earle of 
Gowrey, whose life, honour, and estate were sacrificed to 
the Courte pretence of a Conspiracy, that in pursuance of 
that oppression, the Infancy and" Juvenency of the Pe- 
titioner's father suffered 19 years Imprisonment in the 
Tower of London till the late King was pleased to en- 
large him with 500 li pr Ann out of the Exchequer, And 
m the Parliament of Scotland, 1641, restored him to the 
Barony of Ruthven, which Pension, notwithstanding it 
were the whole visible provision the Petitioner's father 
had for the support of his family, yet the distractions of 
hese times obstructed his due payment, and involved 
him into inevitable debts which cast him into prison, 
where he died, leaving the Petitioner and another Sonne 
m a very poore and lamentable condition ; That your 
Petitioner, having never acted anything to the prejudice 
of your highnesse's interest, and there being neare 5000 li 
due for arrears to the Petitioner's father as by Certificate 
: the Auditor and Receiver gen* of the Exchequer, And 
that by reason of your Petitioner's extreme poverty he 



night have long since perished had he not beene releived 
by his Zife (wife) who is not able longer to contribute, 

" The Petitioners most humbly beg your high- 
nesse's Commisseration of their most sad con- 
dition, That your Highnesse would be pleased, 
if not to restore him to his familyes former 
splendour, yet to such a subsistence as may 
not altogether misbecome the Quality of a 
Gentleman, Honor with Beggary being an 
unsupportable Affliction. 

" And the Pet" as in duty bound, 
" shall pray, &c. 

" RUTH KM." 
" Oliver P. 

"Wee referre this Petition to 
onr Counsel), desiring a tender and 
speedy Consideration hereof may 
be had. 
" Whitehall, the 3'* of November, 1656." 

I was in hopes to have been enabled to report 
the results of this Petition ; but I am sorry to 
say that the searches most kindly made for that 
purpose, at the Public Record Office, by the 
direction of my friend Mr. 'Hardy, the learned 
Deputy-Keeper of the Records, have not led to 
the discovery of any documents upon the subject. 
WILLIAM J. THOMS. 



ARCHBISHOP LAUD AND HIS SEPULCHRE. 

As a sequel to the entries from the Register of 
Allhallows Barking, I append the following extract, 
from the Vestry Minute Book under the date of 
July, 1663. On the 21st of that month and year, 
Laud's body was removed from under the altar of 
this church, where it had lain for more than nine- 
teen years, and in fulfilment of his own wish, in- 
terred at St. John's College, Oxford, where it now 
lies. The vicar, or curate, or churchwarden ap- 
pears to have considered the event worthy of 
poetical treatment, and appends the following 
lines : 

" Upon the remmie of the most Rev d . William Lord Archly' 
of Canterburie his bodie from Allhallowes Barking' 
London, to Ste. John's Colltdg, in Oxford, July the 
xxit, 1663. 

" When first injustice packt up his high Court, 
When usurpation grau'd a broad scale for't > 
When death in Butchers dress did th' ax advance, 
And tragique purpose, with all circumstance 
Of fright and feare, took up the fatall stage 
To set rebellion in its Rule and Rage ; 
When friendship fainted and late Love starke dead, 
When few owned him whom Good Men honored, 
Then Barkinge home then (thus by the world forsook) 
The butchered bodye of the Martyre tooke, 
Tore up her quiett marble, lodged" him sure 
In the cheife. chamber of her sepulture ; 
Where he intire and undisturbed hath bin, 
Murther'd and mangl'd tho at's laying in, 
Where he's untainted too, free from distrust, 
Of a vile mixture with rebellious dust ; 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



S. III. JAN. 3, '63. 



To make that sure, braue Andrewes* begged it meet 
To rot att's Coffin, and to rise att's feet. 
But now our Learned Lawd's to Oxford sent, 
S te JOHN'S is made S tc WILLIAM'S monument, 
Made so by 'mselfe, this pious Primate's knowne 
Best by the books and buildings of his owne, 
Whome tho' the accursed age did then deny, 
To lay him where the Royall Reliques lye, 
Which was his due ; Att's bodies next remoue, 
Hee'll Rise and Reigne amongst y e Blest aboue." 

The name of the poet is not appended, and the 
handwriting diflers from the rest of the book, 
which was kept by a registrar or vestry clerk. 
The vicar at that time was Dr. Edward Layfield, 
Laud's nephew ; the curate and lecturer, Mr. 
Sam. Clarke; the wardens, Mr. Benjamin Shep- 
herd and Mr. Sowden. 

Archbishop Laud expresses in his last testa- 
ment the desire to be buried at St. John's College, 
Oxford, and particularly not to be buried in the 
Tower. JUXTA TURHIM. 



CARFAX, OXFORD. 

It is inquired (1 st S. iii. 508), whether Carfax, 
Oxford, is akin to "Carfoix," carrefour, or four 
ways? The only answer given is in the next 
volume, p. 214, that it is properly quarfax, for 
quatuor facies, because it faces to High Street, 
Queen Street, Cornmarket Street, and St. Al- 
dates. 

I am an old resident of Oxford, and never hav- 
ing heard that interpretation before, think it right 
to state, that in my opinion it is incorrect, because 
St. Martin's, or Carfax Church, faces only two 
ways, that is, east on the High Street, and south 
on Queen Street (formerly the Butcher IRow), 
the other two sides being built up by houses; and 
why should St. Martin's Church at Oxford be 
called four faces any more than any other quad- 
rangular church. 

Anthony Wood, in his History of the City of 
Oxford, edited by Peshall, gives these words : 
" Quartervois, or Carfax," and (p. 17) adds, " or 
the place which tendeth or looketh four ways " 
" quadriviura, or four ways ;" and it is no doubt 
the received opinion in Oxford, that Carfax is a 
corruption of quartervois, because it is situate at 
the centre of the four principal streets of the city, 
or rather of those that were, in ancient times, so 
considered. In 1547, the churchwardens credit 
themselves with 3*. for three quarters of a year's 
cleaning of " the Carfox," and there are many 
similar entries. 

So far there appears to be but little reason for 
my interference with the answer to the query; but 
another interpretation of Carfax was given a few 
years back, by a gentleman who had made British 

Col. Eusebius Andrewes, beheaded on Tower Hill, and 
buried in the chancel of the church, April 23, 1650. 



antiquity, and the etymology of words derive 
from British and Anglo-Saxon, his study : h 
stated very confidently that the supposed corrup 
tion from quartervois was a blunder, and the firs 
syllable was a corruption of caer, and the secon 
of feax, or hair, i. e. the place of hair, in the sens 
of Golgotha, or the place of skulls. Allow me t 
solicit the attention of your many learned Anglo 
Saxon scholars to this conjecture, on which 
venture the following observations : 

1. It is obvious that Oxford, from its centra 
situation, must have existed in British and Romai 
times, although we have not, so far as my know 
ledge extends, any Roman remains. 

2. Wood states the ancient name to be Cae 
Memphric, and that he founded it 1000 year 
before Christ ; he also states that it was calle< 
Caer Bosso, from the name of an earl, temp. Kin 
Arthur. 

3. He also (p. 174) gives the authority of a re 
cord for the fact that the burgesses of Oxford helc 
their Portmanmote Hall in the churchyard, anc 
this is borne out by the fact that the present towr 
hall did not come into the possession of the cit] 
till the reign of Henry III., when it was forfeitet 
by attainder of a Jew, and so fell, confirmed bj 
the Crown, to the corporation. 

If Wood's interpretation is to be received, ii 
would be thus, " St. Martin's Church at the foui 
ways." 

But I submit that Quarter could hardly be cor 
rupted to Caer, and that it is probable the plac< 
so conspicuous as the heart of the city, and when 
the citizens met in council, received the name o 
Caerfeax before the Norman Conquest. 

BOS PlQER. 

Oxford. 



CUCKOO-GUN. 

In Glencreggan (vol. i. p. 50) the author speaks 
of one of the Macdonalds of Saddell thus : - 

" It is said of this chieftain, surnamed ' Righ Fiongal, 
that he was accustomed to amuse himself by keeping 
watch from the battlements of his castle, and firing at 
any suspicious-looking person with a yun that he called 
the cuckoo' " 

In South Pembrokeshire I once heard the fol- 
lowing : 

" Az I waz gwain 1 up Hottery- tottery, 

I peeped in droo 3 lillie 3 : 

There I zaw Cutterel, 4 

Dancin' on her gambrel. 5 
Naibour Hueh, lend me the lent 7 of thy Cuckoo ; 

I'll shut Cutterel, 

Dancin' on her gambrel, 
And thou shalt ha'e the curly pelloo. 8 " 



Going. 2 Through. 3 (?). 4 Rabbit. 5 Cambrel, 
or hock. Neighbour. 7 Loan. 8 Hide, or skin = 
French pelure. 



3'd S. III. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



In South Pembrokeshire, the foregoing would 
be called a ram-es: this word being, perhaps, 
derived from the Danish ramse, rigmarole. But 
my object in this letter is, first, to draw attention 
to the word " cuckoo," which occurs both in the 
vocabulary of High Fiongal, and in this South 
Pembrokeshire ram-es, in the sense of " gun." 
wish to ask, Was some particular sort of gun at 
one time called a "cuckoo"? Or was it a pro- 
vincialism for guns in general ? And wherefore 
should the same prevail in " The Land's End " of 
Scotland, and in " The Land's End" (as it may be 
called) of Wales? Or have the above doggrel 
lines a gipsy origin ? 

The word " lillie" is a puzzle to me. Of course, 
the spelling is my own, and may not well repre- 
sent the sound. Will any of your readers be 
good enough to explain it ? I have an explana- 
tion which, in case of none more probable ap- 
pearing, I propose to give at a future date. 

J. TOMBS. 



JHtnor 

TRADITION THROUGH FEW LINKS. I have re- 
cently met a gentleman, whose mother died at 
Bath in 1822, at the age of eighty-eight. She had 
talked with a woman, who, when a child, had seen 
the dead bodies on the field of Lansdowne in 
1643. M. K. 

GROWTH OF BOGS. Edward Moon, of Liver- 
pool, in the year 1667, indites a rental of his pro- 
perty there for the guidance of his son and heir. 
At p. 72 of The Moon Rental, as published by 
the Chetham Society, he says : 

" You may sell fifty pounds' worth at least of turf to 
the town in a year: for, of my knowledge, you have 
good black turf at least four yards deep ; if so, it may be 
worth two hundred pounds an acre, and you have ten 
acres of it ; in a word, you know not what it may be 
worth, lying so near a great town ; and if you have half 
a yard at the bottom ungotten, once in forty years it 
swells, and grows again." 

M. D. 

To COLT. Nares suggests that this verb " may 
perhaps be derived from the wild tricks of a colt." 
The doubtful " perhaps," however, with which he 
ushers in this etymological guess, seems to show 
that he was aware of the, as I think, fatal objec- 
tion that *' to colt" signifies not so much to frisk 
or play tricks out of wantonness, as to gull, cheat, 
or make a fool of. The true root, as it seems to 
me, is to be found in the Italian verb cogliere, the 
English word being formed as is the case with 
so many derivations from the Latin on the past 
participle colto. In the Elizabethan times Italy 
was the fashionable source of some good and much 
evil, and the Italian verb has not only the deri- 
vative meanings attached to " catch " in English 
and " attraper " in French, but in the modo b*asso, 



or low language, such as would be used by 
sharpers, it is found in the very expression for 
robbing or cheating the yokel. (Vide Vanzon, 
Diz. Univ. d. Ling. ItaL, in voc. " Agresto, Cog- 
Here, Rubare.") BENJ. EAST. 

LATIN ELEGY BY PRAED : GREEK. : ENGLISH. 
In Neale's Views of Seats (" Description of Broad- 
lands "), is a copy of the celebrated Epitaph on 
Lady Palmerston ; and with it, one of the Greek 
elegy from the Anthologia. The following, by 
Praed, written at Eton, is something like the 
Greek, and it has the advantage of being in the 
same metre a metre particularly adapted to 
tender subjects : 

" Quk gelido recubas, frustr& formosa, sepulchre, 

Herba viret, niveis herba decora rosis ; 
Nee signant monumenta locum, nee nomen adempta? 

Servant perpetuS, tristia saxa not&. 
Si quid id est, memini ! nee sculptas arte columnas, 

Nee tumuli curat carmina, vera fides. 
Sit tibi pro busto pietas ; hoc munere vivis, 

Et quam non servant marmora, servat amor. 
Haec lyra te solita est vivam celebrare meamque, 

Nee mea, nee viva es, te tamen usque cano ; 
Nam veteres nequeunt nisus dediscere chords ; 

Et redeunt labris nomina nota meis. 
Nulla dies oritur quae te non reddat amanti, 

Quse te non revocat vespera nulla redit. 
Cum mihi mors aderit, misero reticente magistro, 

Sponte su& poterit * Thyrza ' referre chetys." 

W. D. 



WESTMINSTER SANCTUARY. 

Fecknam, Abbot of Westminster in the reign 
of Queen Mary, produced before Parliament, on 
the second reading of a Bill concerning Sanc- 
tuaries, two documents relating to the Sanctuary 
at Westminster : 

" The one whearof was the Charter of Sanctuarie 
graunted to the house of Westminster by King Edward 
the Sainct ; the other a confirmacion of the same charter 
with a censure of cursse vppon the breakers thearof, 
made at the request of the said King Edward by the 
Pope John, at a generall synode by hym assembled for 
that purpose." 

That the worthy abbot passed off these docu- 
ments as original and authentic, is proved by his 
statement in reference to a fact mentioned in one 
of them, namely, the dream of St. Edward, of 
which the abbot says : 

" This wold I not have alleaged if this notable Prince 
and Saincte had not left it witnessed under his writing 
J and seale as you see before your eyes" 

We may also learn from his speech that he de- 
posited the documents in the hands of the speaker. 
" This I will also leave with you, Master Speaker, 
and the Charter of Sainct Edward." Did the 
abbot ever regain possession of them? I think 
it right to state that, before he left the house, 



6 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3" S. III. JAN. 3, '63 



the abbot, in the simple innocence of his heart, 
declared " how, as ly miracle, these Charters 
were preserved, being found by a servant of my 
Lord Cardinall's in a chields hand playing with 
them in the street"!! Of course miraculous 
agency could effect anything, even the fact of 
both of these documents being found together in 
the band of the same " chield." Was this a mi- 
racle by " my Lord Cardinall," or by the worthy 
abbot himself? Is anything authentic known of 
such documents ? Is there any record of a general 
synod having been called " by Pope John" for 
the purpose mentioned ? Does Westminster still 
possess the rights of sanctuary, and if not when 
were these rights abolished ? 

The abbot mentions in the same speech another 
noteworthy fact, in reference to the body of King 
Edward ; here are his words : 

" The bodie of that most hollie King S. Edward, which 
bodie the favour of AH Mightie God so preserved, during 
the time of our late schisma, that though the heritikes 
had power vppon that whearin the bodie was enclosed, 
yet on that sacred bodie had they no power; but I have 
found it, and sens my camming 1 have restored it to its 
auncient sepulture" 

Where did he find it ? Is it known whether the 
shrine now contains a body, and if so, is there 
any proof that it is indeed "the bodie of that 
most hollie Sainct," and not the corpse of some 
"chield," obtained by the abbot himself? Doubt- 
less your valuable correspondent, who pens his 
Cuttleisms under the benign influences of Poets' 
Corner, may throw some light on these subjects. 

CHESSBOROUGH. 

Harberton, Totnes. 



ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETIES. Which was the 
earliest of these societies in London, and where 
can I find a list of the members ? 

A. K. I. B. A. 

PRINCE ARTHUR. Can you, or any of your 
correspondents, inform me on what authority 
Shakspeare, in his play of King John, lays the 
scene of Prince Arthur's death at Northampton, 
and the occasion of it his attempting to escape 
from his prison by leaping from its battlements ? 

Hume informs us that the king first proposed 
to William de la Bray, one of his servants, to 
despatch Arthur ; but William replied that he 
was a gentleman, and not a hangman, and posi- 
tively refused compliance. Another instrument 
of murder was found, and despatched with proper 
orders, to Falaise, but Hubert de Bourg, Cham- 
berlain to the King, feigning that he himself 
would execute the king's mandate, sent back the 
assassin, and spread the report that the young 
prince was dead, &c. &c. Upon John discovering 
the falsity of the report, he removed him to the 



Castle of Rouen, and there, with his own hands, 
butchered him, and fastening a stone round his 
body, threw him into the Seine. G. S. E. 

CAVE HOUSE SCHOOL. I have seen a notice of 
a little vol. called Recitations of the Pupils at Cave 
House School, 1841. It contains an amusing jen 
d'esprit " Parliamentary Debate on a Resolution 
for the admission of Ladies to the House of 
Commons " written, I presume, by the Master. 
Where is Cave House School, and who was the 
master of the school ? R. INGLIS. 

" CZARINA." " CZARINE." How came we and 
the French to call by these names the wife of 
the Czar, or Tsar, of Russia ? I know nothing of 
Russian, but by my Dictionary (ReifF's) I make 
out the feminine of Tsar to be Tsaritsa. In 
" K & Q." 1 st S. viii. 226, MR. BUCKTON states 
the word to be Tsarina. On what authority ? 
How did the Cz come to be used by us ? Surely 
this spelling did not originate with the Germans. 
They have no such combination in their language, 
and the true phonetic spelling for them would be 
Zar. Both in Bohemian and Polish, cz in com- 
bination produce the sound of English ch in 
" chase," " chair." In Hungarian, to be sure, Cz 
is equivalent to ts, but we certainly did not get 
Czar through that channel. As ts suggests to an 
ordinary English reader a more intelligible sound 
than cz, it seems a pity we do not always write 
Tsar instead of Czar. J. DIXON. 

DON CARLOS. Glover, in Memoirs of a Literary 
Character, says, " Don Carlos told me." Don 
Carlos is probably a sobriquet. For whom ? 

FJTZHOPKINS. 

EXTRAORDINARY CHRISTMAS CAROL. In a 
town in Mid Kent some children were going from 
house to house the other day, singing carols; one 
of them struck me as very odd ; I took down the 
words as well as I could collect them, which ran 
thus, 

" As I sat under a sycamore tree \_tlie last three words 

three times'} 

I looked me out upon the sea, 
A Christmas day in the morning. 

" I saw three ships a-sailing there, \_three times, as 

above~] 
The Virgin Mary and Christ they bare, 

A Christmas day in the morning. 
" He did whistle and she did sing \three. times'] 
And all the bells on earth did ring, 
A Christmas day in the morning. 
"And now we hope to taste your cheer [three times'], 
And wish you all a happy new year, 
A Christmas day in the morning." 

The children said there were a great many more 
verses, which they did not know. Has this very 
singular production ever been printed ? The 
tune was that generally known among children as 
" A cold and frosty morning." A. A. 



3rd s. III. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



SA.LE or DAVIS'S BOOKS, JANUARY, 1756. 
There was probably printed a catalogue of the 
sale of the books belonging to Mr. Charles Davis, 
bookseller in Holborn. If the catalogue is m 
existence, the undersigned would be much obliged 
to "any possessor of a copy who would kindly 
allow him to inspect it. EDWIN C. IRELAND. 

4, Selwood Place, Brompton, S.W. 

GRAINING, INVENTION OF. By whom was the 
art of imitating woods, marbles, &c., invented, 
and at what time ? In the Builder's Price Book, 
1798, "Mahogany grained and varnished" is 
mentioned, but nothing is said of oak, wainscot, 
maple, satin-wood, &c. " Ionic Pilasters in 
Sienna" is another item, but no mention of any 
other marble. A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 

HEWETT FAMILY. In 1586, Arthur Hewett, 
of the City of London, was a party-defendant to 
a suit in chancery relating to lands at Litlington, 
in Bedfordshire. From the company in which I 
find him he must have been a man of some mark 
and standing. Can your correspondent MR. J. 
F. N. HEWETT (3 rd S. ii. 398), or " any other 
man," tell me any thing about said Arthur Hewett? 
JAMES KNOWLES. 

PICTORIAL HISTORY: JUNIUS. T. P. B., who 

threw so much light on a very obscure point in 
this hieroglyphic writing (3 rd S. ii. 401), may per- 
haps help us to a conjecture on a somewhat 
similar difficulty. 

The London Magazine for Feb. 1770, contains 
what is called on the title-page a " Portrait of the 
celebrated Junius." Junius, as there represented, 
is dressed in a clergyman's gown, seated, and 
reading a MS. of the " Letter to the King ;" with 
Lord George Sackville on his left, and Edmund 
Burke on his right, apparently suggesting some 
alteration. About Lord George and Burke there 
can be no doubt ; both are leaning on the table 
the forefinger of the one touching a letter ad- 
dressed " For Ld. G. S k lie," and the arm of 
the other resting on a volume lettered " Sublime 
and Beautiful." But who was meant for Junius ? 
Of course, who was the writer of the Letters is not 
here the question ; but simply, Who was assumed 
to have been the writer ? There have been some 
wild conjectures on the subject, with which I 
need not trouble you. But by way of help to a 
conjecture, I would ask, was this clergyman meant 
for Dr. John Butler, afterwards Bishop of Oxford, 
translated to Hereford ? In an anonymous letter 
to George Grenville, in 1764 (Gren. Corr., ii. 330), 
the writer^ warns the minister against Dr. Butler ; 
and describes him as " a particular friend of the 
infamous Wilkes, with whom he lived in the 
closest connection two summers at Winchester, 
whilst he was engaged on the North Briton.'" It 
is known that, from the first appointment, Butler 



was called " Lord George Germaine's Bishop;" 
and we learn, from Mr. .C.Butler (Reminis,, i. 
86), that to the last Wilkes' s "suspicions fell on 
Dr. Butler, Bishop of Hereford." PI H. S. 

HENRY DEUX WARE. Is there any foundation 
for the following statement in the Chronique des 
Arts as to the artist to whom we are indebted for 
this rare and curious species of ceramic manufac- 
ture ? 

" The problem of the origin of Henry II.'s earthenware 
has just been solved by M. Benjamin Fillon, an amateur 
of Poitiers. This mysterious pottery, which has been 
designated the " Sphinx of Art," was made at Oiron.near 
Thouars (Deux-Sevres), with clay from RJgne. Two 
artists aided in the manufacture the potter, FranQois 
Charpentier, and Jean Bernard, librarian and secretary of 
Helene de Hangert-Genlis, widow of Artus Gouffier, a 
superior woman, who died in 1537." 

H.D. 

KING'S BENCH IN WESTMINSTER HALL, AND 
OLD CARVED STATUES. 

" At the upper end of Westminster Hall is a marble 
stone (perhaps table or bench) of nineteen feet in length 
and three feet in breadth, and a marble chair, where the 
kings of England formerly sat at their coronation din- 
ners; and at other times the lord chancellors: but now 
not to be seen, being built over by the Courts of King's 
Bench and Chancery." Nichols, Coll. of Royal Wills, 
p. 240. 

It is suggested that probably " the same'bar- 
barous insensibility that buried them alive, will 
scruple as little to profane or destroy them, when 
disclosed." (Smith, Antiq. of Westminster, 1807, 
p. 258.) Were these found when the alterations 
were subsequently made ? I suspect not, for Mr. 
Sydney Smirke, R.A., does not mention them, 
and notices that the pavement was lowered several 
feet; this, however, was in 1835. But the Hall 
had undergone a restoration in 1822. What has, 
too, become of the following statues mentioned 
on page 268 ? Perhaps used up as " old mate- 
rials," a favourite expression of builders arid 
contractors. 

" Eight fragments of elegant figures, carved in the 
reign of Richard II., similar in style to the six over the 
Courts of King's Bench and Chancery, were discovered 
in niches of exquisite workmanship, against the lower 
part of the front of Westminster Hall. Five of them 
against the north-east tower are much mutilated, four of 
which are without heads; but the three, against the 
north-west tower, are more perfect; they have heads, 
and one of them is a graceful female, wearing a crown. 
Six of these statues are as large as life ; and the other 
two are about four feet high. All these statues are of 
fire stone." 

WYATT PAPWORTH. 

LEGEND or METHUSELAH. In the Essay by 
j Benjamin Franklin, entitled The Art of procuring 
pleasant Dreams, is the following : 

" It is recorded of Methusalem, who, being the longest 
liver, may be supposed to have best preserved his health, 
that he slept always in the open air ; for, when he had 



8 



NOTES AND QUERIES. [8* s. m. JAN. 3, '63. 



lived five hundred years, an angel said to him, < Arise, 
Metbusalem, and build thee an house, for thou shalt live 
vet five hundred vears longer.' But Methusalem an- 
swered and said : ' If I am to live but five hundred years 
longer, it is not worth while to build me an house; I 
will sleep in the air as I have been used to do. 

What authority had Franklin for this old 
world story ? GAMMA. 

WILLIAM LONG, ESQ. Can any of your readers 
oblige me with a copy of the epitaph of the above- 
named gentleman in Salisbury Cathedral, where 
he was buried? He died 24 March, 1818, at 
Marwell Hall, Owslebury, Hants : also inform me 
if the armorial bearings of Mrs. Long, the same I 
fancy as Dawson (Spaldington, co. York) are 
impaled with Mr. Long's on the monument, or 
placed on an escutcheon of pretence. Mr. Long 
completed the rebuilding of Marweli Hall about 
1 816 ( Vide Duthy's Sketches of Hampshire, p. 308). 
Any recollections of him would be acceptable. 

F. G. 

NICEAN BARKS. Can any of your correspon- 
dents favour me with an explanation of the allu- 
sion in these lines of E. A. Poe ? 

" Helen, thy beauty is to me, 
Like those Nicean barks of yore, 
That gently o'er a perfumed sea, 
The weary, way-worn wanderer bore 
, To his own native shore." 

A GALWEGIAN. 

ORDER OF ST. JOHN OF JERUSALEM. Can any 
of your correspondents kindly inform me where I 
am likely to obtain authentic information relative 
to the present state and position, of the English 
langue of this Order ? Who are its dignitaries, 
council, &c. ? And where do they meet ? 

CONSTANT EEADER. 

PEERAGE FORFEITED. I once read, and I 
imagine the circumstance was mentioned in 
Burke' s Patrician, or in his St. James's Magazine, 
that in the eleventh or twelfth century, or there- 
abouts, a nobleman forfeited his title in conse- 
quence of the insufficiency of his estate to sup- 
port the dignity. Can any reader of " N. & Q." 
inform me when, and to whom, this event oc- 
curred, and if any other instance is on record ? 

C.J. 

PROCESSIONAL CROSS FOUND IN IRELAND. In 
what number of the Morning Post, under the 
head of " Ireland " " from our Correspondent," for 
this year does an account of the discovery of an 
ancient processional silver cross appear ? It was 
found at some Irish abbey. ANON. 

" SELLENGER'S ROUND," ETC. In the article 
of " Christmas Hospitality " (" N". & Q." 3 rd S. ii. 
481), DR. RIMBAULT quotes a passage from the 
old dramatist Middleton about "dancing Sel- 
lenger's Round in moonshine about Maypoles." 
Will that gentleman, or any other correspondent, 



be kind enough to refer me to a parallel, or ex- 
planatory notice, of the ceremony mentioned ? or 
indeed, to any poetical authority for dancing round 
the maypole by moonlight ? 1 presume the fol- 
lowing lines, transcribed by MR. ELLACOMBE 
from Corbet, exhibit another accidental resem- 
blance in terms ? 

" Oh, how his Maypole's founder's heart did swell 
With full-moon sides of joy, when thatcrackt bell," &c. 

D. 

N. SCARLETT. There was published by 1ST. 
Scarlett a " Scenic arrangement " of Isaiah's 
Prophecy, &c. 4to, 1802. This relates to the fall 
of Babylon. Is it arranged or adapted by Mr. 
Scarlett in the form of a Sacred Drama ? 

R. INGLIS. 

STONE CIRCLES. Were there any mediaeval 
practices connected with the above, which met 
with the attention and extorted the condemnation 
of councils and clerical writers ? C. 

DID SIR WILLIAM WALLACE VISIT FRANCE ? 
We have very little information concerning Wal- 
lace excepting through Henry the Minstrel, com- 
monly called Blind Harry, and much that he 
relates is not very generally believed even in 
Scotland. 

In some circumstances Blind Harry might have 
been misled by popular tradition. Some years 
ago, however, a public document was discovered 
on the Continent, which made Wallace known in 
foreign countries as a distinguished man at home : 
it was a letter addressed by him, as " Governor of 
Scotland," to the Hanse cities. I cannot designate 
it more particularly, but it is published by one of 
the book clubs. 

I wish to suggest, that by examining some of 
the public archives in France, the visit of Wallace 
to that country might be ascertained, and addi- 
tional proof thus found of the authenticity of 
Blind Harry's history. 

It is mentioned in this old poem, now very 
little known, that Wallace was in Guienne, Bour- 
deaux, Picardy, Sluys (Flanders), Paris, and 
Chinon. 

Among your correspondents at home and abroad 
there may be some who would search for the name 
of Walles, Vallis, or Valleius, in the old local his- 
tories of the above provinces and cities. A. 

KING WILLIAM RUFUS, AND THE PDRKISS FA- 
MILY. In the Beauties of England and Wales, it 
is said that the descendants of Purkiss, who, ac- 
cording to the inscription on Rufus Stone in the 
New Forest, conveyed the king's body in a cart 
to Winchester Cathedral, still lived close to the 
spot ; and, according to the tradition, have never 
been sufficiently rich to keep a complete team, or 
poor enough to apply for parish relief. Are there 
any of this ancient family still in the neighbour- 
hood ? M. N. 



S. III. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



" STONEWALL" JACKSON. Can any of the 
readers of " N. & Q." give authentic information 
as to the origin of the sobriquet of this now 
famous General ? I have heard several anecdotes 
upon the subject, but am at a loss to know how 
far any of them are true. The historical celebrity 
of this officer would justify a record of the cir- 
cumstances in the pages of " N. & Q." 

JOHN MACLEAN. 

Hammersmith. 

[Our correspondent's Query has received an answer in 
The Times of the 30th Dec. Their " Special Correspon- 
dent," writing from Richmond, after giving an interest- 
ing sketch of the great Southern General, proceeds to 
sav : " As there are many conflicting reports about the 
origin of the name Stonewall, it may be interesting to 
repeat the true circumstances under which it was given. 
In the first battle of Manassas, on July 21, 1861, General 
Bee of South Carolina (himself subsequently killed in 
the same action), observing his men flinching and waver- 
ing, called out to them to stand firm, exclaiming : ' Look 
at^Jackson's men, they stand like a stone-wall ! ' In his 
official report of the battle, General Beauregard employed 
the same expression in connection with General Jack- 
son's command, and the name has clung to General 
Jackson ever since."] 

CAPT. RICHARD PIERCE of the "Halsewell " East 
Indiaman. The melancholy fate of this gentleman 
with his daughters, Miss Elizabeth and Miss 
Mary Anne, who were wrecked off the Island of 
Pyrbeck, Dorsetshire, and perished on January 
6, 1786, excited the greatest commiseration. He 
had been a long time a resident with his fa- 
mily at Kingston-upon-Thames, which was their 
usual place of interment, but his remains were 
never found. A hatchment was put up in the 
church for him, and a funeral sermon was preached 
for him by the Rev. Matthew Raine, on Sun- 
day, February 19, 1786, from James iv. 14, the 
latter part "For what is your life," &c. (4to, 
1786), and published by desire of the bailiffs and 
corporation of Kingston. I do not find any par- 
ticulars of this sorrowful catastrophe in Manning's 
Surrey^ nor in Anderson's History of Kingston, 
1818. Though both have an account of a monu- 
ment by Rysbrach to a Richard Pierce, gent. 
(Qy. an ancestor?), who died June 22, 1714, 
aged ninety-four, who received a wound through 
his body atEdgehill fight, in the year 1642, as he 
was loyally defending his king and country. The 
widow of the foregoing Richard Pierce died April 
29, 1807. Where can I find further particulars 
of Capt. Pierce, the family, and the unhappy fate 
of the "Halsewell"? *. 

[Two small works have been printed on the loss of the 
"Halsewell." 1. "A Circumstantial Narrative of the 
Loss of the Halsewell ' East-Indiaman, Capt. Richard 
Pierce. Compiled from the communications, and under 
the authorities of Mr. Henry Meriton and Mr. John 
Rogers, the two chief officers who happily escaped the 
dreadful catastrophe." Lond. 8vo, 1786. An abstract of 



this Narrative is printed in The Annual Register, xxviii. 
224-233. 2. " An Interesting and Authentic Account of 
the Loss of the Halsewell, with all its dreadful circum- 
stances." Lond. 8vo, 1786. From these works we glean 
a few particulars of Capt. Pierce ; that he married the 
daughter of Thomas Burston, Esq., the collector of ex- 
cise for the county of Surrey, and that since their mar- 
riage they constantly resided at Kingston. Capt. Pierce 
had acquired a competent fortune, which was due to his 
merits and industry, and he intended this fatal voyage to 
be his last. At the time of his death he had been mar- 
ried above twenty years, and his disconsolate widow was 
left with six children, one an infant at the breast. Capt. 
Pierce's two daughters, Anne and Mary, who perished in 
the " Halsewell," were going to India to be married to 
gentlemen of large fortunes. The eldest was only seven- 
teen, and the youngest but fifteen years of age. For two 
poetical pieces upon this sad catastrophe, see The Universal 
Magazine, Ixxviii. 40, 214.] 

SIR THOMAS WYATT. Can any of your cor- 
respondents tell me what became of the descen- 
dants of Sir Thomas Wyatt, who lived in the 
reigns of Henry VIII. and Mary ? His estates, I 
believe, were mostly in Kent. Had he any family, 
or if not, who came to the title, or is it extinct ? 
There is one Sir Matthew Wyatt, 5, Hyde Park 
Square, London, now alive. How came he by his 
title? There are Wyatts living on the south- 
west coast of Sussex, originally of Preston or 
Rustington. Are they the descendants of Sir 
Thomas Wyatt ? What was his crest and armo- 
rial bearings ? R. E. G. A. E. 

[Perhaps the most satisfactory reply to our correspon- 
dent's Query will be the following inscription on the 
Wiat monument in Boxley church, Kent : 

" Edwin Wiat, serjeant-at-law, son and heire male of 
S r Francis Wiat of Boxley Abby, and Margaret his wife, 
was at one time justice of the peace of this county, recor- 
der of Canterbury, and recorder and burgess in parliament 
for the corporation of Maidstone ; one of the Council of the 
Court before the President and Council in the Marches of 
Wales ; and the chiefe justice of the grand sessions for 
the counties of Carmarthen, Pembroke, and Cardigan. 
He married Frances, second daughter and co-heir of 
Thomas Crispe, of Quex in Thanet, Esq., by whom he had 
Thomas and other sons, and Margaretta and other daugh- 
ters, buried in this chancell, and hath Edwin, Francis, 
and Richard liveing, and erected this monument, 1702, 
To the memory of S r Henry Wiat, of Alington Castle, 
Knight banneret, descended of that ancient family who 
was imprisoned and tortured in the Tower in the reign of 
King Richard the Third, kept in dungeon, where fed 
and preserved by a Cat. He married Anne, daughter of 
Thomas Skinner, Esq. of Surry, was of the Privy Coun- 
cil to King Henry the Seventh, and King Henry the 
Eighth, and left one son, Sir Thomas Wiat* of Al- 
ington Castle, who was esquire of the body to King 
Henry the Eighth, and married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas Brooke, Lord Cobbam, and well known for learn- 
ing and embassys in the reign of that King. Sir Thomas 
Wiat, of Alington Castle, "his only son, married Jane, 
youngest daughter of Sir William Hawt of this county, and 
was beheaded in the reign of Queen Mary, leaving George 
Wiat, his only son that lived to age, who married Jane, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Finch of Eastwell, and Kathe- 
rine his wife, restored in blood by act of Parliament of the 
13th of Queen Elizabeth, and leaving also two daughters ; 



* The poet. 



10 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAN. 3, 'C3. 



Anna, who married Roger Twisden of Royden Hall, Esq 
and Jane who married Thomas Scot, Esq. 

"George Wiat was succeeded by his eldest son Sir 
Francis Wiat, twice governor of Virginia, and married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir Samuel Sandys of Ombersly 
in Worcestershire. George Wiat left also Hawt Wiat, 
who died vicar of this parish, and hath issue liveing m 
Virginia; and left also Elionora, married to Sir John 
Finch, parson of Forditch. Sir Francis Wiat*, by his 
wife Margaret, had issue the said Edwin Wiat, and also 
Elizabeth, who married Thomas Bosvile of Little Mote, 
Einesford, Esq., and by him hath Margaretta, his only 
daughter and heire, who is married to S r Robert Marsham 
of the Mote in Maidstone, K>, and Baronet." 

On the monument is a coat quarterly of eight. 1. 
Parted per fess azure and gules, a barnacle argent ; 2. 
Argent, 3 bars gules, in chief a greyhound courant, sable ; 
3. Gone ; 4. Argent, on a chevron sable, 5 horse-shoes or ; 
5. Argent, on a chevron sable between 3 hearts gules, as 
many martlets or; 6. Or, a cross engrailed, gules; 7. 
Gone; 8. Gone. 

Of the sons of Serj. Wiat 1. Edwin, married a daughter 
of Edward Hales of Chilston, and died s. p. ; 2. Francis 
died s. p. ; 3. Richard died s. p. 1753, leaving his estates 
to his relative Lord Romney of the Mote. 

That the affections of the family were alienated from 
the Seyliards, by litigations, is proved by the omission of 
all allusion to them on the family monument. 

The same circumstance will account for Richard Wiat 
leaving his estates to Lord Romney, to the exclusion of 
the descendants of Sir Thomas Seyliard. The consan- 
guinity was the same in either case : the Seyliards, through 
a brother of the Serj., and the Marshams through a sister, 
but the families were irreconcilably estranged. 

If it can be proved (which we much doubt) that all Sey- 
liard's daughters died without representatives, then the 
present Earl of Romney is the proper representative of 
the Wiats. Doubtless the descendants of the younger 
sons of George Wiat may be still in existence, but we have 
no means of ascertaining the fact. 

The old coat of Wiat was Or, on a fess gules between 3 
boars' heads couped sable, langued gules, 3 mullets of the 
field. 

Sir Henry Wiat, Privy Counsellor to Henry VII. 
adopted for his coat Per fess azure and gules, a bar- 
nacle argent, which the family afterwards bore, some- 
times in conjunction with the old coat, and more often 
alone. 

The arms on the monument in Boxley, as cited above, 
prove that Serj. Wiat bore the barnacle alone. 

Our correspondent asks, "Who came to the title?" 
In reply, we would remind him that there was no here- 
ditary title. Those who had any were knights.] 

JENNER or WILTS, WORCESTERSHIRE, AND 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE. In a biography of Dr. Jen- 
ner it states, that his father was " the possessor of 
considerable landed property, and a member of a 
family of great antiquity in that county (Glouces- 
tershire) and in Worcestershire." Is there any 
published pedigree of this family ? In Burke's 
Landed Gentry occurs Jenner of Wenvoe Castle, 

The inscription on the monument ignores altogether 
lenry the eldest son and heir of Sir Francis, who had an 
only daughter and heir, Frances, married to Sir Thomas 
Seyliard, Bart. 

this omission may be accounted for bv the long litiga- 
tions which were carried on between Serj. Wiat (who 
ected this monument) and his niece Lady Seyliard, as 
to the inheritance of the Boxley estates 



Glamorganshire, but only dating back to 1775, to 
the father of the late Sir Herbert Jenner Fust ; 
they do not seem to have been of Dr. Jenner's 
family, but of Kentish extraction. What were 
the arms of Dr. Jenner ? 

In Ackerman's History of the University of Ox- 
ford, there is a Baron Jenner, 1687, mentioned : 
was he a judge? Is anything known of him? 
In Cromwell's Letters and Speeches there is a 
letter to Robert Jenner, M.P., of Cricklade, 1648. 
Any information on these points will greatly 
oblige R. J. F. 

[We have not been able to discover any pedigree of 
the Jenner family. The arms, crest, and motto of Jenner 
of Berkeley and Jenner of Wenvoe Castle (according to 
Burke's Landed Gentry) are the same, and may have 
descended from the same stock. Arms : Az., two swords 
erect, in chev., arg., hilts and pommels, or, between three 
covered cups, of the last. Crest: A covered ' cup, or, 
standing between two swords, in saltier, arg., hilts and 
pommels of the first. Motto : In pretium persevero. As 
supplementary to Dr. John Baron's Life of Dr. Edward 
Jenner, 2 vols. 8vo, 1838, some interesting particulars of 
this celebrated physician will be found in the Cheltenham 
Examiner of Jan. 22, 1862, and March 12, 1862, from the 
pen of a gentleman who was for the last twenty years of 
his life upon terms of the most friendly intercourse with 
the Doctor. 

Sir Thomas Jenner, a Baron of the Exchequer, was 
born at Mayfield in Sussex, and married Ann Poe, only 
daughter and heiress of James Poe, Esq. His arms were 
originally, Vert, three cups covered, or ; but were altered 
to azure,' with the addition of two swords in chevron or. 
It is stated in the Gent. Mag. for August, 1814, p. 116, 
that " the late Sir Francis Fust, Bart., of Hill Court. 
Gloucestershire, was related to the Jenner family by an 
intermarriage with the Poe family, and he always ac- 
knowledged Edward Jenner of Berkeley to be a relation." 
For biographical notices of Sir Thomas Jenner, see 
Gent. Mag. for June, 1814, p. 544; and August, 1814, 
p. 116, also Campbell's Lives of the Chief Justices, ii. 93, 
101, 117, 128. 

Robert Jenner, or Jennor, M.P., was a goldsmith of 
London, who died in 1651. He was the founder of a 
free-school at Cricklade, of almshouses at Malmesbury, 
and of the church of Marston Meysey. He is said to 
have been afterwards outlawed ; and on that account the 
endowments which he left for the support of his chari- 
table foundations, both at Cricklade and at Malmesbury, 
have been lost. See Button's Wiltshire, iii. 17, ed. 1825.] 

DR. ARNE'S " THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN." 
The following nursery rhymes were sung to me 
a short time ago by two young ladies, who said 
they were taught them by an elderly couple, 
being told by them that the words were set to 
music by Dr. Arne for George IV. when a child. 

The air appeared remarkably melodious and 
much after his style. I have searched what com- 
positions there are of his at the British Museum, 
and have been unable to find any trace of it. I 
bave also looked through a work on Popular 
Rhymes and Nursery Tales by J. O. Halliwell, 
but. it was not there. 

Can any of your musical correspondents throw 
any light on the subject, and tell me where the 



3 r<1 F. III. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



11 



music (if ever published) is to be found ? By sc 
doing they will much oblige JNO. REYNOLDS. 
" There was an old woman toss'd in a blanket, 
So high, so high, so high as the moon, 
And under her arm she had a broom. 
' Whither, ah ! whither, art thou going ? ' said I. 
' I am going to sweep the cobwebs from the sky, 
And I will be with you by-and-bye." 
P.S. I have inquired at Cocks and Co.'s, am 
other music publishers, but they know nothing of it 
[Chappel,in his Popular Music of the Olikn Time, ii. 571 
has given another version of this well-known nursen 
rhyme, which he states is sung to the tune of Lilliburlero 
the music of which he has printed on the following page : 
" There was an old woman went up in a basket, 

Seventeen times as high as the moon, 
And where she was going I could not but ask it, 

Because in her hand she carried a broom. 
* Old woman, old woman, old woman,' said I, 
' Where are you going? whither so high?' 
' To sweep the cobwebs off the sky, 
And I shall be back again bye-and-bye. ' "] 

BKYAN FAUSSETT, 1755. Who was he, and 
what were his arms or the arms of his family ? 

W. P. L. 

[The Kev. Bryan Faussett of Heppington, near Can- 
terbury, to whom we owe the formation of the celebrated 
Collection of Anglo-Saxon relics now in the possession of 
Mr. Mayer of Liverpool, was one of the most remarkable 
archaeologists ever known in England. Between the 
years 1757 and 1773 it is stated that he^opened from seven 
to eight hundred sepulchral tumuli. Mr. Faussett was 
a Fellow of All Souls' College, and Rector of Monks' 
Morton, in Kent. He died on Feb. 10, 1776. His grand- 
son was the Kev. Dr. Godfrey Faussett, the Lady Mar- 
garet's Professor of Divinity in the University of Oxford, 
and a Canon of Christ Church. Arms : Or, a lion, ram- 
pant, sa., debruised by a bend, gobony, arg. and gu., 
quartering Bryan, Godfrey, and Toke. (See Burke's 
General Armory.) Crest: A demi-lion, rampant, sa., 
holding in the paws a Tuscan column, inclined bendways, 
gobony, arg. and gu., the base and capital, or.] 

" HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS," ETC. I have in 
my possession a book of the following title : 

" Historical Collections relating to the Originals, Con- 
versions, and Involutions of the Inhabitants of Great 
Britain to the Norman Conquest, in a continued discourse." 
London, 170G. 

Who was the author of this work ? He seems 
to have been a clergyman of the Church of Eng- 
land. The book shows extensive and well-digested 
learning, and the style is good. 3 C. 

[This work has been attributed to Dr. George Hickes ; 
?w the P roduction of Thomas Salmon, M.A., Rector 
ot Mepsall, co. Bedford. We have seen a copy with the 
name printed on the title-page.] 

PETER Bouis.-- Can you inform me where I 
may obtain some account of the life arid labours 
of Peter Bouis ? E. F. WILLOUGHBY. 

[If by Peter Bouis is meant Peter de Brays, the founder 
of the sect of the Petrobrussians, some notice of him will 
be found in the Biographical Dictionaries of Moreri, Rose, 
Chalmers, and Hook. The best account of him, however, 
s by_Baronius (Annales Ecclesiustici, torn, xviii. p. 396, 
ed. 1746.] 



JOHN HAMPDEN. 
(2 nd S. viii. 495, 646 ; xii. 271.) 

The exhumation of the body of Hampden has 
been lately mentioned by Mr. Forster in his Me- 
moir of Lord Nugent, prefixed to the third edition 
of Some Memorials of John Hampden, his Party, 
and his Times ; and still more recently by Mrs. 
Grote in her Collected Papers, fyc. 

I had the pleasure of being intimately ac- 

Juainted with Lord Nugent for many years, and 
may speak with some authority upon this sub- 
ject, as I am, I believe, with one exception, the 
only survivor of those immediate friends who 
were specially invited by him to be present on 
that occasion. I never heard that he was inclined 
to "deny his participation," but I believe Mrs. 
Grote may be right when she further describes 
him as " becoming in some sort ashamed of the part 
he had borne in the affair." For myself I have 
always extremely regretted that I was an assistant 
in it, and I sympathise entirely with the feelings 
of the parish clerk as related by Mrs. Grote. It 
was indeed "a sorry sight" the remembrance of 
it even now haunts my imagination. 

It is right, however, to observe that Lord 
Nugent had deceived himself in his expectations. 
He said, when he asked me to accompany him 
upon this expedition, that he had obtained per- 
mission to open the Hampden vault, and that we 
should readily find the coffin of John Hampden, 
and therein probably a mere skeleton, from which 
it would be easy to ascertain whether the bones 
of the arm and shoulder had been in any way frac- 
tured. It turned out, however, that there was 
no family vault in Hampden church, and that the 
exact spot where the patriot had been laid in the 
earth was not certainly known. 

On Saturday the 19th of July, 1828, I left 
London with Lord Nugent and Mr. Denman 
'then Common Serjeant of London, afterwards 
d Denman). We halted at Chalfont to see 
the church, and the house where Milton had for a 
ime resided ; thence to Amersham and Aylesbury, 
where we visited the county gaol ; and upon that 
>ccasion I made my first, and I hope my last, ap- 
>earance on the treadmill, in company with the 
uture Lord Chief Justice of England. We ar- 
ived in the evening at Lilies, Lord Nugent' s 
esidence, and on the following Monday morning 
tarted early for Great Hampden, where, at the 
:hurch door, we were met by the Rev. Mr. Brooks, 
he rector ; Mr. Grace, Lord Buckinghamshire's 
and steward ; Mr. C. Moore, the eminent sculp- 
or ; Mr. Coventry, and one or two other gentle- 
men. 

After the inscriptions on several coffins had 
)een examined, one was found about four feet 



12 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3" S. III. JAN. 3, '63. 



from the surface, on the right-hand (south ?) side 
of the communion table, on which no letters were 
legible ; and as the plate was not much decayed, 
it seemed probable that there never had been any 
inscription. It was immediately determined that 
this should be opened. The outer coffin of wood 
had been covered with velvet. The inner coffin 
was a very thick leaden one. It was cut open, 
and the lead rolled back ; the body was laid in a 
wooden shell, and upon removing the sawdust, 
was found to be enveloped in very numerous 
folds of cerecloth, which would perhaps account 
for its remarkable preservation ; the flesh was 
white and firm, but with no other odour than that 
of the surrounding earth. The features were 
much compressed by the weight of the bandages ; 
the eyes were covered with a white film ; the 
beard had been shaven, but there appeared a 
growth of about a sixteenth of an inch. The hair 
was long and flowing, as represented in the por- 
traits of Hampden ; it had been collected and tied 
with a black ribbon at the back of the head. In 
colour it corresponds with the description given 
by Mrs. Grote. I cut off a lock, which is still in 
iny possession. 

As there was no surgeon present, Lord Nugent 
descended into the grave, and endeavoured to as- 
certain whether there was any wound upon or 
near the left shoulder ; but it being found impos- 
sible thus to make a satisfactory examination, the 
coffin was raised, and set upon tressels in the 
middle of the chancel. The body was placed in a 
sitting posture, with a shovel to support the head. 
The shoulders and arms were then carefully in- 
spected, and the result proved that Lord Nugent's 
"foregone conclusion" that Hampden's death 
was occasioned by a gun-shot wound in the 
shoulder was at once dissipated. There did not 
appear any discolouration, or the slightest injury 
to the shoulders or arms ; but in order to be 
perfectly satisfied, Lord Nugent himself, with a 
small pocket knife borrowed from me at the 
instant, made several incisions in the parts ad- 
jacent to the shoulder joint, without finding any 
fracture or displacement of the bones. Lord 
Nugent was evidently disappointed: he did not 
care to establish the fact that Hampden's death 
was occasioned in any other manner than by a 
shot from the king's troops. 

My own opinion rather leaned to the tradition 
related by Sir Robert Pye (Hampden's son-in- 
law), that his right-hand was shattered by the 
bursting of his pistol, and that death probably 
ensued from lock-jaw, arising out of extensive 
injury to the nervous system. When I took up 
the right-hand it was contained in a sort of funeral 
jloye like a pocket. On raising it I found it was 
entirely detached from the arm ; the bones of the 
wrist and of the hand were much displaced, and 
nad been evidently splintered by some violent 



concussion, only the ends of the fingers were held 
together by the ligaments. The two bones of the 
fore-arm for about three inches above the wrist 
were without flesh or skin, but there were no 
marks of amputation ; both the bones were per- 
fect. The left-hand was in a similar glove, but 
it was firmly attached to the arm, and remained so 
when the glove was drawn away. There were 
slight portions of flesh upon the hand ; the bones 
were complete, and still held in their places by 
the ligaments which supported them. This remark- 
able difference in the condition of the hands 
sufficiently proves the truth of Sir Robert Pye's 
relation of the cause of Hampden's death. 

I have written down the facts as they came 
under my own observation. If any of your 
readers should desire to see what has been fur- 
ther said upon this subject, I would refer them to 
your own pages as above quoted ; to the Morning 
Chronicle newspaper of the time ; to the Gentle- 
man's Magazine for 1828 ; to the Quarterly Re- 
view for 1832, and to the two works which are 
mentioned at the commencement of this paper. 

I left the church early in the afternoon with 
Lord Nugent, Mr. Denman, and Mr. Moore ; and 
after having been hospitably entertained at the 
old mansion-house of Great Hampden by Mr. 
Grace, in the absence of Lord Buckinghamshire, 
we returned to London the same evening. 

I know nothing of what subsequently passed in 
the church. It was said that several hundred 
persons had been there during the afternoon, and 
on the following morning, for the body was not 
re-interred until the next day. Exposure to the 
air must have caused great alteration in the state 
of the flesh, for a rapid change was apparent even 
during the first hour. While Lord Nugent was in 
the church no surgeon had been present ; the arms 
were not amputated, nor was the body touched 
with a knife by any other person but Lord Nugent 
himself, and in the manner above-mentioned. 

Mr. Forster states that Lord Denman always 
entertained the strong belief that he had gazed on 
what had been Hampden. Such I know to have 
been his opinion at the time, and such I al?" 
know was then Lord Nugent's opinion, however 
he may have afterwards thought proper to change 
it. His letter to Mr. Murray, as quoted by Mr. 
Forster, shows that he desired to throw an air of 
ridicule over the transaction. 

In the inscription which he wrote for the monu- 
ment to the memory of Hampden, erected in 
1843, on the field of Chalgrove, the cause of death 
is so evidently guarded, that it cannot be ques- 
tioned " he received a ivound of which he died" 
Under the circumstances a very safe and prudent 
conclusion. WILLIAM JAMES SMITH. 

Conservative Club. 



3'd s. III. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



13 



YORKSHIRE SUFFERERS IN 1745. 
(3 rd S. ii. 450.) 

" And statutes reap the refuse of the sword." 

The following list of persons, who suffered at 
York for serving on the losing side in the Civil 
War of 1745-6, is compiled from the Gentleman's 
Magazine, and Mr. Robert Chambers's History of 
the Rebellion in Scotland, 2 vols., 1827. 

Further information as to those who died by 
the hangman's hands at this period for the Stuarts, 
may be found in The Scots' Magazine for 1747,* 
where there is a " list of persons attainted and 
adjudged to be guilty of high treason in Great Bri- 
tain, since the 24th June, 1745, taken mostly 
from a list dated, Exchequer- Chamber, Edin- 
burgh, Sep. 24, 1747, and spelled and designed as 
in it" (p. 649). Mrs. Thompson's Memoirs of 
the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745, 3 vols., 1845; 
Howell's State Trials, 34 vols. 8vo, 1809-29; 
Burton's Hist, of Scotland, from 1689 to 1748, 
2 vols. 8vo, 1853 ; and Wilkins's Complete History 
of the trials, contain useful matter. The Act of 
Attainder of the Jacobite Peers and Gentry of 
Scotland, is to be found in the Statutes at Large, 
Geo. II., 19, cap. xxvi. It is short, and would 
be serviceable to many persons if reprinted in 
"N.&Q." > 

The merciless proceedings of the Government 
of the day were approved and encouraged by a 
large and powerful party : they were considered, 
indeed; far too lenient by many persons. An in- 
stance of this spirit, and of the baneful effect of 
misunderstanding the Hebrew annals, occurred at 
York on the 21st of August, 1746; when the 
chaplain of the High Sheriff of that county f 
preached in the Minster, before the Judges, from 
the text : 

" And Moses said unto the judges of Israel, Slay every 
one his men that were joined unto Baal-peor." Numbers, 
xxv. 5. 

A half-length portrait of William, Duke of 
Cumberland, was published about this time, blas- 
phemously inscribed with the motto : " ECCE 
HOMO." Pilate's words concerning our Lord. 

A memorial of the sufferers in this quarrel, in 
the shape of a full-blown rose, printed from an 
engraved plate, in blue ink, was issued by the 
Jacobites. It has been suggested, that it was in- 
tended as a ticket of admission to the secret meet- 
ings of the party : this, however, I do not think 
probable. Copies are very rare. An engraving 
of this relic may be seen in the Gentleman's Ma- 
gazine for 1828, vol. i. p. 17. 

* There is a copy of this periodical in the British 
Museum Reading Room. 

f Henry Ibbetson, Esq., of Woodhonse, created a ba- 
ronet May 12, 1748 ; died, June 22, 1761. Arms : Gules on 
a bendcotized, argent 3 escallops of the field. Two golden 
eeces were added as an augmentation when the title 



Executions at York. 

November 1, 1746. Ten persons hanged: In the first 
sledge, Geo. Hamilton, Captain; *Edward Clavering, 
Dan. Frazier, *Cha. Gordon. In the second sledge, Ben. 
Mason, Jam. Mayne, *W T m. Conolly.J *Wm. Detnpsey. 
In the third sledge, Angus M'Donald, James Sparks. 

Novembers, 1746. Eleven persons hanged: Dav. 
Row, a prisoner taken at Clifton; *Wm. Hunter, of 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, of Col. Towneley's Regiment; 
* John Endsworth of Knottesford, Cheshire, of Col. Grant's 
Regiment; John M 'Clean, a Highlander, and John 
M'Gregor of Perthshire, both of the Duke of Perth's Re- 
giment ; Simon M'Kenzie of Inverness, and Alex. Parker 
of Morayshire, both of Col. Stuart's Regiment ; Tho. 
M'Ginnis of Bamffshire, and Arch. Kennedy of Air-shire, 
both of Gen. Bucket's Regiment; James Thompson of 
Lord Ogilvie's Regiment ; *Michael Brady, an Irishman, 
of Glengary's Regiment. 

November 15, 1746. One person hanged : James 
Read. 

Those persons distinguished in the above list 
by a star (*), were members of the Roman Catho- 
lic Church. 

The following persons were also under sentence 
of death for the same cause, but were reprieved : 
Wm. Crosby, Win. Barclay, John Jam. Jellens, 
Dan. Duff, Dav. Ogilvie, Dav. Wilkie. 

The heads of Conolly and Mayne were fixed 
upon Michaelgate Bar. Hamilton's was packed 
in a box, and sent to Carlisle to undergo similar 
exposure. 

Mason and Mayne, when on the scaffold, replied 
to a question of the under- sheriff, that " they 
were content to die for the cause they had en- 
gaged in, and died in charity with all men." One 
of them adding, that he " died because his king 
was not upon the throne." When they^had been 
hanging a very short time, the executioner cut 
them down, and did his office : what that was, 
those who are acquainted with our unreformed 
penal code in all its details, will not call to mind 
without a shudder. The chronicler of events,_ in 
the Gentleman's Magazine, shrank from repeating 
the details ; and, therefore, refers his readers to 
the case of Col. Francis Towneley, and those who 
suffered with him, for the same cause, on Ken- 
nington Common, July 30, 1746 ; whose execu- 
tion he had probably himself witnessed. _ The 
following is Mr. Robert Chambers's narrative of 
that event, somewhat condensed : 

" When they had been suspended three minutes, the 
soldiers went under the bodies, drew off their shoes, 
white stockings, and breeches; and the executioner pul- 
led off the rest of their clothes. When they had been 
stripped perfectly naked, the last mentioned official cut 
down Mr. Towneley, and laid him on the block; observ- 
ing the body to retain some signs of life he struck it 
several violent blows upon the breast for the humane 
purpose of rendering it totally insensible to what re- 
was conferred, as a reward for loyalty, and a memorial 
of Sir Henry's connection with the town of Leeds. 
(Thoresby's Ducat. Leod. 1816, p. 146). 

J Chambers calls him "Collony" (vol. ii. P- 262). 
Chambers calls him " Roe." 



14 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 3, '63. 



mained. This not having the desired effect, he cut the 

throat Then, cutting open the body, he took out 

the bowels and heart which he threw into the 

fire ; and finally, with a cleaver, separated the head from 
the body, and put both into a coffin." Vol. ii. p. 232. 

None of those leaders of the French Revolution, 
whom the world has set up as its types of modern 
brutality, ever perpetrated under colour of law 
anything half so horrible as this ; but in the time of 
our Tudor and Stuart sovereigns, the manner of 
carrying the sentence into effect was frequently 
far more revolting. 

In the year 1857, a number of human bones 
were discovered within the precincts of York 
Castle, which were believed to be the remains of 
those who suffered in 1746. 

The Doncaster Gazette, of April 17, thus no- 
tices the discovery : 

" Within the last few days, a curious discovery has 
been made behind York Castle. A number of excavators 
were employed there to dig a drain, when they turned 
up the remains of about twenty human bodies; but the 
skulls of three or four of them were wanting, and the 
bones appeared mixed together in such an unusual man- 
ner as to excite the curiosity of all who saw the positions 
in which they were found. The conclusion formed re- 
specting them is, that they are the remains of twenty- 
one Scottish rebels who were executed near York, ten of 
them on Saturday, the 1st, and the remainder on Satur- 
day the 8th of November, 1746, when they were hanged, 
drawn, and quartered ; the local paper which was in ex- 
istence at the time stating, that 'the whole was con- 
ducted with the utmost decency and good order! ' " 



Bottesford Manor, Brigg. 



EDWARD PEACOCK. 



REFUGEES FROM THE LOW COUNTRIES. 

(3 rd S. ii. 449.) 

The persecutions under the Duke d'Alva caused 
a large influx of foreign Protestants to this country 
in 1567. 

"The trading people of the town and country with- 
drew from the provinces in such vast numbers, that the 
Duchess of Parma wrote to Philip II. that 100,000 men 
had left the country with their money and goods, and 
that more were following every day." 

Great numbers settled in London, and at Sand- 
wich, Canterbury, and Southampton; also at 
Norwich, Yarmouth, Maidstone, &c. &c. Strype 
says, the pope took upon him, in his Bull, to 
charge Queen Elizabeth, for these poor strangers, 
in these slanderous words, viz., " That all such 
as were the worst of the people resorted hither, 
and were by her received into safe protection." 
Many of these refugees, who had arrived as early 
as 1562, were charged by their enemies with being 
" ebriosi et sectarii," and accordingly lists of the 
members of the London Congregation were sent 
to the Court, and to the Bishop of London, as 
Superintendent of all the Foreign Churches. 



Besides this, every ward made a search and re- 
turn to the Secretary of State of the ' Strangers * 
within their jurisdiction, with their ages, trades, 
number of children and servants, and what church 
they frequented. (See " N. & Q.," 2 nd S. viii. 447.) 
Since the publication of my History of these 
refugees (1846), the State Paper Office has been 
thrown open to the historian, who will there find 
a curious letter from the Bishop of London to 
Cecil, dated 8th Sept. 1562, in which he says : 

"I have enjoyr.ed y c ministers off the frenche and 
duche nation to grant me in a p'fite Cataloge of theyre 
Communicantes (they not knowinge to whatt ende it is 
required) w ch att the laste certificate did not excede the 
number off 900 in both churches." (Vol. xxiv. No. 24.) 

The letter, however, which more immediately 
refers to the refugees of 1567, is one from the 
Bishop to Cecil, written in this same year, en- 
closing a book of five pages prepared by the re- 
fugees, referring to the murders, pillories, mas- 
sacres, imprisonments, re-baptism of little children, 
banishments, confiscations, and all sorts of " des- 
bordements " executed against the faithful sub- 
jects of the King in the Low Countries, and 
supplicating grace and licence 

"a touts gentilshommes, borgeois, marchants et arti- 
zants des pays bas de povoir librement venir en cestun 
vostre Royaume, et ses retirer en villes lesquelles ils 
vous plaira de nommer et designer a cest effect et quelles 
il leur soit permit de librement demeurer negotier et 
exercer toutes sortes de stils fet mestiers chascun selon 
sa sorte et qualite ou quelque aultre quil estimera plus 
convenable en regard au particuliers commodites des 
lieux & la charge touttefois en condition que ch'sun 
apporte certificate (a 1'apprusment.) du Consistoire de 
1'eglise de v're ville de Londres," &c. &c. (S. P. 0. 
vol. xliii. No. 29.) 

Of the 30 masters settled at Norwich in 1564, 
24 were Dutch and 6 Walloons, and the cloth 
they made was called " Flemish Cloth." " The 
Flemings taught the manufacturing of our Wool 
into Broad Cloth, Rashes, Flannels, and Per- 
petuanas, by which our Lands were advanced 
from 10 and 12 to 20 and 22 years' purchase." 

The Flemings who settled at Canterbury about 
1567 came from Lille, Nuelle, Turcom, Waterloo, 
Darmentures, &c. &c., as appears by the numerous 
wills and marriage contracts still existing. 

JOHN S. BURN. 

The Grove, Henley. 



THE HENNINGS AND WILLIAM OF WYKEHAM 
(3 rd S.ii.468, 513.) Your correspondent C. J.R. 
has given me most valuable information, for which 
I am deeply obliged to him. Perhaps he will 
have the kindness to fill up an hiatus still ex- 
isting in the pedigree. The particulars are as 
follows : 

1. Richard Fiennes, 4th Lord Saye and Sele. 



3^ S. III. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



15 



2. Elizabeth, m. William D'Anvers, of Cul- 
wortb, Esq. 

3. Mary D'Anvers, m. Robert Barker, of 
Esq. 

Hugh Barker, of Great Harwood, Esq. 

Elizabeth (ob. 1728), m. Harry Meggs, Esq. 

Jane Meggs in. 1701 Joseph Henning, of 
Notton House, Esq. 

Harry Henning, of Henning's Crookston, Esq. 
(b. 1705.) 

I am anxious to show that Hugh Barker was 
son or grandson of Robert and Mary Barker 
(No. 3.) THOMAS PARR HENNING. 

Leigh House, Wimborne. 

REVOCATION OF THE EDICT or NANTES (3 rd S. 
ii. 339.) In my list of works on the refugees of 
1685, I omitted Histoire de V Establissement des 
Francois Refugiez dans les Etats de son Altesse 
Electorate de Brandebourg. Par C. Ancillori, 
Chancellier. Berlin, 1690. JOHN S. BURN. 

The Grove, Henley. 

" HISTORY or KILMALLOCK" (3 rd S. ii. 490.) 
ABHBA inquires whether the late Mr. Crofton 
Croker printed for private circulation, historical 
illustrations of Kilmallock ? 

Sketches of Kilmallock, the Bailee of Ireland' 
were printed in a small folio, Nov. 18, 1840 ; fifty 
copies for private circulation, of which I have one. 
There are seven plates, representing: 1. Frag- 
ments ; 2. Plan of Kilmallock in James I.'s time ; 
3. The Queen's Castle ; 4. The High Street of 
Kilmallock ; 5. The Church of St. Peter and St. 
Paul ; 6. South Transept of St. Dominick's Ab~ 
bey ; 7. Autographs from originals in the S. P. O. 
of remarkable persons connected with the " His- 
tory of Kilmallock," between 1571 and 1601. 

Ev. PH. SHIRLEY. 
Lough Fea, Carrickmacross. 

THOMAS BARLOW, BISHOP OF LINCOLN (3 rd S. 
ii. 448.) MR. BENSLEY will see the relationship 
I referred to, between the two Bishops Barlow, in 
Burke's Extinct and Dormant Baronetage, under 
the article "Barlow of Slebetch." I mention this 
as the most likely work (giving the information) 
within his reach, in the out-of-the-way place 
whence his Query is dated. S. T. 

OLD FRENCH TERMS (3 rd SJii. 506.) 

1 . Terres guagnables : lands reclaimed from the 
sea. 

2. Terres en esteules : lands after the grain has 
been reaped ; in stubble. 

3. Ablais : the grain cut, but not removed from 
the field. 

4. Wagnegcs, probably gagnages : ancient term 
for grain, or other productions of the earth, whilst 
still growing. 

5. Cherquemaner, cerqnemaner : to arrange the 
measurements of land, and place the landmarks 
for boundaries. R. M'C. 



WILDFIRE (3 rd S. ii. 431, 498.) In reading 
the first of these articles, I was half inclined to 
suggest an explanation, which appeared so prob- 
able to me, that I thought it must occur to many 
other minds, and that I should be anticipated. 
However, the different suggestion of MR. BUTLER 
(p. 498), makes me think it as well to present 
mine also for the judgment of readers. 

I imagine the "wildfire" may mean nothing 
else than the ignis fatuus, known as " Will-of-the- 
wisp," &c., and called "wildfires" in many dis- 
tricts. Though these luminous vapours hover 
over low marshy lands, the rent shall not there- 
fore be diminished, " for the land remains not- 
withstanding and cannot be thereby consumed." 

M.F. 
Mount Prospect, Cork. 

ST. LEGER OF TRUNKWELL (3 rd S. ii. 450.) 
In reply to S. L. O. I beg to say that I have 
discovered that Mary St. Leger was not a 
daughter, but a grand-daughter, of Sir John 
Chardin. Jane Amelia, daughter of Sir John, 
married Henry Le Coq St. Leger (died 1747), 
of Charleston, Middlesex, before 1715. They 
afterwards lived at Trunkwell. They had issue, 
Amor Le Coq St. Leger, \vho died in June, 
1723, under,, age ; Amele Margaretta Le Coq St. 
Leger, died Feb. 6, 1730, of age ; Elizabeth Do- 
rothy Le Coq St. Leger married Solomon Blossett, 
of Dublin, before 1736 ; Mary Le Coq St. Leger, 
of Trunkwell, spinster, in 1736 ; Henrietta Le 
Coq St. Leger of ditto, spinster, in 1736 ; Theo- 
dore Le Coq St. Leger, died Oct. 25, 1718, under 
age. They were Catholic Protestants (or Pro- 
testant Catholike, according to BIBLIOTHECAR. 
CHETHAM, in " N. & Q.'.' p. 448, above quoted). 

Jane, Amelia's mother, Esther ?, was a 

French Protestant refugee, and was married to 
Sir John Chardin "in London," April 24, 1681. 
Elizabeth, dan. of Sir John Chardin, was born 
Sept. 19, 1684, at Holland House, Kensington, 
and dying Oct. 20, 1741, was buried in Bath 
Abbey. In my MSS. dated about 1750, I find 
the name is Le Coq. In Chancery proceedings 
it is written Le Cog. I think mine is right. 

F. FlTZHENRY. 

KNIGHT OF THE CARPET (3 rd S. ii. 388.) 
[ can add another illustrative quotation to that 
of LORD LYTTELTON'S, and from the same author, 
Sir Walter Scott : 

" His square-turn'd joints and strength of limb, 
Show'd him no Carpet-Knight so trim, 
But in close fight a champion grim, 
In camps a leader safe." 

Marmion, Canto i. Stanza 5. 

Thinking that any information respecting the 
author of Marmion would prove interesting to 
the readers of " N. & Q.," I have enclosed the 
bllowing cutting from a Scotch paper. His 



16 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



S. III. JAN. 3, '63. 



friends, the Skenes, were of an ancient family ; 
whose paternal estate was at Rubislaw, near Aber- 
deen, and where the old manor house is still to be 
seen : 

" THE LATE MRS. SKENE OF RUBISLAW. Mrs. Jane 
Skene, wife of Mr. Skene of Rubislaw, who died on the 24th 
ultimo, was one of the links of a past generation. She 
and her husband were intimate friends of Sir Walter 
Scott, and occasionally assisted in his literary labours, 
the poet owing much of the materials of his Quentin 
Durward to the pen and pencil of the Skenes. They 
were his friends up to his latest hour. When Scott was 
in the midst of his difficulties, he chronicles in that 
melancholy diary of his visits from Mr. and Mrs. Skene 
as green spots in the day's sore journey. ' Of late,' he 
journalises, 'Mr. Skene has given himself much to the 
study of antiquities. His wife, a most excellent person, 
was tenderly fond of Sophia. They bring so much old- 
fashioned kindness and good humour with them, besides 
the recollection of other times, that they must always be 
welcome guests.' Mrs. Skene's name will ever live while 
Marmion is read. In the introduction to Canto IV., Scott 
thus refers to her marriage : 

* Arid such a lot, my Skene, was thine, 

When thou of late wert doomed to twine 

Just when thy bridal hour was by 

The cypress with the myrtle tie. 

Just o'n thy bride her Sire had smiled, 

And blessed the union of his child, 

When love must change its joyous cheer, 

And wipe affection's filial tear"' 

The melancholy event here referred to was the death of 
Sir William Forbes, which occurred shortly after his 
daughter's marriage to Mr. Skene. Sir William, who 
died in 1828, is best known as the biographer and the 
friend of Beattie the poet. Mr. Skene survives his wife, 
and has turned his devotion to antiquities to good ac- 
count, as he is understood to have nearly ready for issue 
an important work on the early history of Scotland." 
Banffshire Journal. 

< v . ' OXONIENSIS. 

^ STATURE OF A MAN FROM HIS SKELETON (3 rd S. 
ii. 411.) Any such calculation will prove only a 
loose approximation, I shouklMhink. I knew a 
man, about six inches taller tnap myself, whose 
head, when we were sitting together, was, if any- 
thing, lower than mine. And I constantly see 
two sisters, of whom one is taller when they stand, 
and the other when they sit. J. P. O. 

FOREIGN MONEY, ETC. (3 rd S. ii. 449.) E. F. 
D. C. will find, in a curious and interesting book 
termed the Gossipping Guide to Jersey, published 
by Le Feuvre of that island, an account, at p. 197, 
of ancient French money, in which several of the 
terms he inquires for appear. 

By it we learn that, by the old French system, 
a denier was the twenty-fourth of a sol or sou (i.e. 
a halfpenny). A sol was the twentieth part of a 
livre, franc, or tenpence ; and a louis (Tor was 
divided into twenty-four livres. The term livre 
tournois was equivalent to the cours de France, 
and was the usual mode of computation. Livre 
Parisis evidently means the Parisian rate of ex- 
change, and like monnoie tfordre, was no doubt 



an exceptional, as well as a local, method of com- 
putation. 

Although the bonnier and quartier de terre do 
not appear in the work quoted, the oxgate, virgate, 

Avergee occur in it, as applied to land measure. 

The value (ancient) of French money was 8i 
aer cent, lower than English coin of the present 
day, calling the sou the exact equivalent of a half- 
penny. PUGTJS PUGSTILES. 

WTNDHAM AND WINDHAM (3 rd S. ii. 454.) I 
feel obliged to T. W. B. for his concise and clear 
statement respecting these two families. It is 
plain I "was mistaken on two points ; 1. In thinking 
that the Wyndhams of Dinton got no part of the 
Egremont property ; 2. In imagining that Lord 
Leconfield had a brother, to whom Cockermouth 
Castle was devised. 

In the last age there was another family of 
Wyndhams, residing in " The Close," Salisbury. | 
I do not know whether they left representatives. 
Within my own recollection, there was the Rev. 
Dr. Wyndham, of Hinton, near Christchurch. 1 
am ignorant to which branch he belonged. 

Notices of Wyndham. 
"Here truant WN-ndham every muse gives o'er, 

Here Talbot sinks, and is a wit no more." Pope. 
"On Wyndham, just to freedom and the Throne, 
Great master of our passions and his own." Ibid. 

Of his Son, Lord Egremont. 

"Even the callous pride of Lord Egremont was 
alarmed." Junius. 

" This man, notwithstanding his pride and his Tory 
principles, had some English stuff in him." Ibid. 

With regard to the Windhams of Norfolk, I 
was aware of the change of name from Lukin to 
Windham, but thought that the two families 
were nearly related. 

Both Wyndham and Windham were originally 
from Wymondham, a town or village in Norfolk. 
(Collins's Peerage, " Egremont.") 

The Earl of Egremont, as one of the Secretaries 
of State, signed the general warrant, in Wilkes's 
case, which led to such important consequences. 
[Annual Register.) W. D. 

As considerable discussion has been excited on 
this point, it may be useful to refer such of your 
readers as may feel interested in this matter to a 
memoir of William Windham, Esq., in Coxe's 
Life of his (Windham's) tutor, the celebrated 
scholar and naturalist, Benjamin Stillingileet, 
F.R.S. (vol. i. pp. 161-165.)* His character as 
there given represents him as a young mnn of 
great genius, but indulging in some extraordinary 
freaks, bearing no little similarity to some of the 
" eccentricities " of his notorious descendant. A 
portrait in the same work has a striking resem- 
blance to those of the present Mr. Windham. B. 

* London, 1811. 



3' d S. III. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



17 



HOMERIC THEORY (3 rd S. ii. 329.) I cannot 
free myself from what S. S. calls " the wild notion 
that the Iliad and Odyssey were not the work of 
one great poet." The contrary appears to me as 
probable as the removal of the house at Loretto 
without miracle ; but I am not a Homeric scholar, 
and I do not seek controversy. The state of the 
question up to 1846 is well and fairly given by 
Dr. Ihne in Smith's Classical Dictionary, ii. 500, 
art. "Homerus." After noticing Casaubon and 
Bentley, he says : 

" Some French writers, Perrault and Hedelin, and the 
Italian Vico had made similar conjectures, but all these 
wefe forgotten and overborne by the common and general 
opinion, and the more easily as these bold conjectures 
had been thrown out almost at hazard, and without sound 
arguments to support them." 

Perrault gives as conjectures the opinions which 
Wolf has supported, and says : 

" Je les ay oui' soutenir par des tres-habiles gens. 
L'Abbe Daubignac, que nous avons connu tous deux n'en 
doutoit pas. Il avoit des memoires tout prets pour faire 
un ample traite" sur cette matiere, ou il pretendoit prouver 
la ^ chose invinciblement. On nous assure d'ailleurs, 
qu'on travaille la-dessus en Allemagne ou ces memoires ont 
peut-etre passe." Perrault, Pardlelle des Anciens et des 
Moderns, p. 25. Paris, 1693. 

As Dr. Ihne mentions Hedelin (D'Aubignac), 



tremity. His respiration was hardly perceptible, 
and he was nourished by food taken in by Lazarus. 

Rueffe, Pare, Palfyn, and Winslow give accounts 
of two other bicephalous monsters, who attained 
at least to puberty ; as well as of several who 
have had the lower extremities, or the lower half, 
of a twin brother or sister, in union with them- 
selves; but for these I would refer him to the 
detailed descriptions given by medical authors, 
who have carefully sifted the evidence on which 
the accounts rest. E. F. WILLOUGHBY. 

University College, London. 

FORTHINK : CHAUCBR (3 rd S. ii. 377, 479.) 
CHESSBOHOUQH may verify my quotation from 
Chaucer for half-a-crown, by purchasing a copy 
of the admirable edition of the Canterbury Tales, 
edited by Mr. Thomas Wright, and published at 
that price by Messrs. Griffin. The text follows 
MS. Harl. 7334, and the numbering of the lines 
is arranged in accordance with Tyrwhitt's edition. 
That CHESSBORODGH may see in what points it 
differs from his own copy, I subjoin the number 
of the last line of each division of the poem, up 
to that in which my quotation occurs : 

Prologue, 860. Knight's tale (Palamon and 
Arcite), 3110. Miller's prologue, 3186; tale, 
3852. Reeve's prologue, 3918 ; tale, 4322. Cook's 



perhaps these memoirs were afterwards published, prologue, 4362 ; tale, 4420. Man 'of Law's pro- 
shall be obliged by information on this point, 

ar>d as to whether anything is known of the work 

then going on in Germany. H. B C 

U. U. Club. 

A TWO-HEADED MAN (3 rd S. ii. 470.) The 
" Italian gentleman with two heads " seen by Mr. 
Thoresby was undoubtedly James Poro, a native 
of Genoa, born in 1686, who had an excrescence 
in the form and features of a human being growing 
out of his side. This child, as it was called, was 
named " Matthew." Sir Hans Sloane possessed 
a painting of him, which I believe is now in the 
British Museum, and from which Faber in 1722 
made an excellent mezzotint engraving. 
> Poro was exhibited in London in 1714. The 
time of his death is not known. J. H. W. 

The bicephalous gentleman mentioned by your 
correspondent W. P. was probably the same with 
an Italian seen by Winslow in 1698, justTsixteen 
years previously to the date given by W. P 's 
author. He is described by Winslow, a trust- 
worthy writer, as having a second head, much 
smaller than his own, connected to the chest 
below the cartilage of the third rib. 

Bartholin (from eye witness) and Zacchias 
mention the case of a well-formed man, at. 28, 
named Lazarus Colloreob, who had a deformed twin 
brother, John, hanging by the chest from the lower 
part of the sternum. His head was larger than 
that of Lazarus. He had two arms, with three 
nngers on each hand, but only one lower ex- 



logue, 4518 ; tale, 5582. Wife of Bath's prologue, 
6439 ; tale, 6846. Friar's prologue, 6882 ; tale, 
7246. Sompnour's prologue, 7290; tale, 7876. 
Clerk of Oxenford's prologue, 7932 ; tale (Patient 
Griselda) : part 1, 8072 ; part 2, 8324 ; part 3, 
8485 ; part 4, 8660 ; part 5, 8814 ; part 6, 9052. 
L'envoi de Chaucer, 9088. Merchant's prologue, 
9120; tale, 10,292. 

CHESSBOROUGH'S copy is, I should think, the 
edition of 1561 ; in respect to which, Tyrwhitt 
says, " it seems to have been usual to print books 
in partnership, and for each partner to print his 
own name to his share of the impression." The 
editions of 1542, 1546, 1555, and 1561, were re- 
prints of that of 1532, edited by Mr. William 
Thynne ; and that CHESSBOROUGH'S copy was one 
of these would seem to be proved from the fact 
that, though printed in the reign of Elizabeth, it 
contains Thynne's dedication to Henry VIII. 

JOB J. BARDWELL WORKARD, M.A. 

HOUGHTON FAMILY OP JAMAICA (3 rd S. ii. 
449.) I presume SPAL is aware of the marriage 
between Gary Helyar, of Jamaica, and Priscilla 
Houghton, in 1671. May I ask him for the favour 
of any further information respecting the Helyar 
family ; or rather, that branch of it settled in 
Jamaica ? C. J. R. 

LAWRENCE FAMILY (2 nd S. x. and xi. passim.') 
I have reason to think that information respect- 
ing members of this family might be obtained from 
the registers of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields, London. 



18 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3" S. III. JAN. 3, '63. 



Between the years 1678 and 1684, are entries of 
the baptisms of several of this name : children of 
Thomas Lawrence, Esq., or, as he is called in the 
later entries, Sir Thomas. His wife's name was 
Ann : the children baptized were Thomas, Giles, 
Mary, and Henry. 

In the same church is a monument to Sir 
Soulden Lawrence, Knt., Justice of the Kind's 
Bench, who died in 1814, aged sixty-three. He 
was son of Thomas Lawrence, M.D. C. J. R. 

GEORGE CHAPMAN (3 rd S. i. 170.) MR. CUN- 
NINGHAM is probably acquainted with Parton's 
History of St. Giles's Parish. In that work will 
be found the inscription upon the monument 
erected to G. C. by Inigo Jones, together with 
the remains of the original inscription. The burial 
register contains an entry which perhaps refers to 
his family : " 1655, May 7. Mrs. Martha Chap- 
man, buried." C. J. R. 

HAZEL EYES (2 nd S. xii. 270, 337.) MR. BUCK- 
TON (whom I beg to thank for his communica- 
tion), having definitively settled the colour of 
hazel eyes, I wish to know further, Why so many 
writers (especially our female historians) call 
greyish-blue hazel ? E. g. : 

1. Mrs. Jameson, in her Female Sovereigns, 
says of Christina, Queen of Sweden, that her eyes 
were "a brilliant hazel, quick and penetrating." 
A portrait of this queen, in the Art Treasures 
Exhibition, had blue eyes. Mademoiselle de Mont- 
pensier (an eye-witness) says, " Elle a les yeux 
bleus ;" while the Countess de Bregy (another eye- 
witness) says decidedly : "Ses yeux sont beaux, 
bleus, et de ce bel azur dont nous paroit le del" 

2. Miss Strickland, in her Life of Queen Ka- 
therine Parr, says : " Her complexion was that of 
a genuine Westmoreland beauty brilliantly fair 
and blooming, with hazel eyes, and hair of a 
golden auburn." The description here given is 
from a miniature which is now being exhibited at 
the South Kensington Museum ; and the eyes in 
that miniature are greyish-blue, as anyone may 
see who will examine it, and compare it with Miss 
Strickland's description. (It is the original of her 
portrait of Katherine Parr.) 

\at 3. Miss Costello, in her Eminent Englishwomen, 
says of Bess of Hardwicke, with whose life she 
commences, that her eyes were "hazel, with a 
deep tinge of blue." 

Here are the three first examples which occur 
to me, and I doubt not that more might be easily 
found. HERMENTRUDE. 

ARISTOCRATIC MAYORS (3 rd S. ii. 410, 478.) 
The Reply of MR. PHILLIPS is scarcely an answer 
to the Query of ABHBA, as I fancy the appoint- 
ment of the mayors of Stamford, in the eighteenth 
century, was not by "popular election." Before 
the passing of the Corporation Reform Act of 
1835, the appointment of the mayor of Liverpool 



was in the freemen at large ; and I find that 
James, tenth Earl of Derby, was mayor of that 
borough in 1734. His successor in the earldom, 
Edward, was, while Sir E. Stanley, Bart., mayor 
of Preston, viz. in 173L-2 ; but the Preston Cor- 
poration was a close one, and the mayor was not 
chosen by popular suffrage. WM. DOBSON. 

Preston. 

I beg to send the following cutting from the 
Irish Times, December 20, 1862 : 

"THE LORD MAYOR ELECT. The selection of the 
Hon. John P. Vereker as Lord Mayor of Dublin has 
given rise to some discussion in Notes and Queries and 
other English papers, as to the connection of members'of 
the Aristocracy with the civic chair. The present Vis- 
count Gort (when the Hon. Major Vereker) was twice 
mayor of Limerick, and so was the Hon. Colonel Smyth 
Vereker, the uncle of the present Lord Mayor. We also 
find that the Duke of Bolton was mayor of Winchester 
in 1GGL; and the Duke of Chandos in 1784. The Mar- 
quis of Donegal was mayor of Carrickfergus in 1817, and 
other 3'ears. The Marquis of Westminster, of Chester, in 
1807. The Earls of Derby were often mayors of the 
great commercial port of Liverpool : for instance, in 1GGG, 
1677, 1707, 1734. An Earl of Derby was also mayor of 
Chester in 1702 ; as was the Earl of Warrington in 1G91. 
The Duke of Newcastle, whilst Earl of Lincoln, was 
mayor of Newark in 1768. The records of other Cor- 
porations will afford abundant instances of civic honours 
similarly accepted by members of the Peerage." 

ABHBA. 

CORBET or SPROWSTON (3 rd S. ii. 448.) Cle- 
ment Corbet, LL.D., Chancellor of Norwich, and 
Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, was the sixth 
son of Sir Miles Corbet, of Sprowston (who died 
1607), by his first wife Catherine, daughter of Sir 
Christopher Heydon. He was uncle to Sir John 
Corbet, the first baronet of Sprowston, to Miles, 
the regicide, and to Amy, wife of Brewster : they 
being respectively the first and second sons and a 
daughter of Sir Thomas (second son of the said 
Sir Miles) by Anne, daughter of Edward Barrett 
of Belhouse, Essex. (Visitat. Norfolk, 1611, 
MSS. Harl. 1177, fol. 105 ; MSS. Add., 5524, 
fol. 132. And see Blomf. Norfolk, viii. 188; x. 
459.) Bishop Corbet does not appear to have 
been of this family. The biographical dictionaries 
say that his father was a Surrey man. 

CHARLES SPENCER PERCEVAL. 

VIOLIN : RUGGIERI (3 rd S. ii. 491.) There were 
several makers of violins, &c., of the family of 
Ruggeri, but there seems to be a little difference 
of opinion as to their numbers. The eldest ap- 
pears to have been Francesco, who worked at 
Cremona from 1640 to 1684, or somewhat later. 
He was a pupil of Antonius Amati, and made some 
good instruments, after the model of his master. 
He was frequently called il Per, as in the follow- 
ing ticket : " Francesco Ruger. detto il per. in 
Cremona dell anno, 1645." Hejiad a son called 
Giacinto, who worked at Brescia in the latter part 
of the century, who was sometimes called II 



S' d S. HI. JAN. 3, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



19 



buono. There was also a Pietro Giacomo Rug- 
"eri at Brescia, in the beginning of the eighteenth 
century, said to have been a pupil of Nicolaus 
Amati, some of whose instruments are good. The 
distinguished performer, Piatti, has, or had, a fine 
violoncello of his make. WM. S. 

JOHN HALL, BISHOF OF BRISTOL (3 rd S. ii. 389, 
41.5, 497.) Bishop Hall's gift of Bibles is still dis- 
tributed at Kidderminster ; the books are stamped 
with an inscription in gilt letters, and also a coat 
of arms. Information on this point could be ob- 
tained by addressing a letter to Mr. W. Fawcett, 
Wolverley, Kidderminster. Bishop Hall also be- 
queathed 800/. to the poor of his native town of 
Bromsgrove, directing the proceeds to be distri- 
buted in money and Bibles. An estate at Elm- 
bridge was purchased with the money ; and it 
would appear, that for some time, the charity was 
a great loser through falling into the hands of a 
Presbyterian trustee. A handsome carved chair, 
formerly the property of Bishop Hall, is preserved 
in the vestry of the New Meeting Chapel, Kidder- 
minster, side by side with Baxter's pulpit, and is 
represented in my etching of Baxter's Pulpit, pub- 
lished in the Gentlemaits Magazine, January, 
1854; a copy of which etching is very much at 
your correspondent's service. CUTHBEET BEDE. 

NOTICEABLE ENTRIES IN THE REGISTERS OF 
ALLHALLOWS BARKING (3 rd S. ii. 497.) In reply 
to E. S. C. may I state that I have no further in- 
formation respecting Sir James Bourchier. 

There is no entry of Snaith's burial ; the Re- 
gister for the year 1651 is defective for reasons 
described in the last paper. George Snaith's 
tomb remains on the floor of the north aisle, a 
brass plate describing him as a " native of Dur- 
ham, and auditor to Wm. Laud, Archp. of Canter- 
bury." He seems to have been a favourite ser- 
vant, and received a legacy of 501. out of the small 
sum saved by Laud from the rapacity of his per- 
secutors. He was buried in May, 1651. 

Col. Ashton's name is not in this Registry. 

Many thanks for E. S. C.'s notes. 

JUXTA TURRIM. 

THOMAS CAMPBELL (3 rd S. ii. 475). Will 
SHOLTO MACDUFF give me, either in "N. & Q." 
or privately, the date of the notice referred to ? 
As to the lines " On Linden," &c., I doubt the ac- 
curacy of the last sentence, for many of Camp- 
bell's poems did first appear in the Greenock 
Advertiser. Your correspondent is altogether 
wrong in his reference to the then editor. The 
lady he alludes to was not the wife of an Irish 
but of a Scotch gentleman. M. 

" O BOLD AND TRUE" (3 rd S. ii. 491.) OXONI- 
ENSIS will find the lines u O bold and true, in 
bonnet blue," with a stanza in addition to that he 
quotes, in Sir Walter Scott's Fair Maid of Perth 
chap. xv. Cg 



HEIRESS'S SON (3 rd S. ii. 430, 515.) If, as I 
take it, the proper marshalling of coat armour is 
an index of descent, it appears to me an " heraldic 
anomaly" that the law advanced by F. L. B. D. (in 
which, however, I find he is supported by some 
writers) should be enforced. I can see that an 
impropriety and inconvenience would arise by a 
child quartering the maternal coat if, as is popu- 
larly believed, the right to do so were heirship to 
money, and not to representation or co-represent- 
ation; but as an heiress (heraldically speaking) 
need have nothing but her arms either to throw 
round the neck or put in the pockets of her hus- 
band, I do not think that there could be or has 
been any objection to the children marking their 
descent by quartering the coat, as well before as 
after the mother's death. 

On the other point, also, I differ from F. L. B. D. 
I believe that the children of an heiress would be 
entitled to bear her arms solely, as representing 
her family, if there were no paternal coat to 
quarter them with. S. T. 

ST. CECILIA, THE PATRONESS OF Music (3 rd S. 
ii. 370, 433, 509.) Only a few final words on 
this subject. The main question is set at rest ; 
and it is clear that there is no foundation in the 
Acts of St. Cecily for her being chosen the Pa- 
troness of Music. Whether her Acts are authentic 
is quite foreign to the inquiry. I am by no means 
convinced that they are worthy of credit. (I shall 
never adopt the new, ill-formed, and odious word 
reliable.) But this is neither the place nor occa- 
sion to discuss the authenticity of the Acts. I am 
astonished, however, that CANON DALTON should 
think me inclined to the belief that they were first 
compiled by Metaphrastes, in the tenth century, 
when I had just before mentioned the observation 
of Fleury, that they were believed early in the 
ninth. Metaphrastes gave them in the form in 
which we now have them ; but whether he did 
not embellish them, as he did so many others, is 
open to inquiry. F. C. H. 

ROOD COAT (3 rd S. ii. 491.) The rood coat was 
probably the purple cloth for the cross, with which 
it is covered on Passion Sunday, and which re- 
mains upon it till Good Friday. MR. T. NORTH 
appears to confound the loft with the rood, which 
was the large crucifix which stood in the centre 
of the loft. F. C. H. 

POLVARTIST (3 rd S. ii. 491.) Your correspon- 
dent MR. N. MACKIE has misread the sign-board 
over Mr. Hovvell's house, the word being Poly- 
artist (i. e. an artist in many departments), not 
Pofoartiflt, which is of course unintelligible. The 
y in the sign-board has some resemblance to a v, 
which has led to the mistake ; but it seems strange 
that Mr. Mackie, who states he had an interview 
with Mr. Howell, did not think of asking tie 
latter for an explanation. 



20 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3rd s. III. JAN. 3, '63. 



Let me add that Mr. Howell, though an old 
man, cannot be much over seventy, so that he 
can hardly be described as of " great age." He 
wrote and published some years ago an Essay on 
the War Galleys of the Ancients a production 
of some merit. Gr. 

Edinburgh. 



NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC. 

Black's General Atlas of the World. A Series of Fifty- 
six Maps. New Edition, containing the New Boundaries, 
and numerous Additions and Improvements ; accompanied 
by an Alphabetical Index of 65,000 Names. (A. & C. 
Black.) 

The reputation which Black's General Atlas of the 
World has already acquired for its clearness, comprehen- 
siveness, accuracy", and cheapness, will be well sustained 
by the present issue, which contains all the new boun- 
daries and latest discoveries; the kingdom of Italy, with 
its new divisions; a new Map of China, which is of 
course of peculiar interest at the present moment, when 
all are looking anxiously to the important results which 
it is hoped will flow from the expedition which is about 
to proceed thither under the command of Captain She- 
rard Osborne; and lastly, a new sketch Map of the 
Federal and Confederate States of America a map which 
many will examine still more curiously after the late 
eventful battle before Fredericksburg. Of the various 
merits claimed for this Atlas, two are difficult to bring 
home to our readers without the test of personal inspec- 
tion, namely, its accuracy and clearness. The other two 
are readily shown. Its" cheapness is manifest ; that it 
contains fifty-seven imperial folio maps, which are sold 
half-bound in morocco for 60s. Its comprehensiveness is 
equally shown by its Index, which contains no less than 
65,000 names of places which are to be found in those 



Vicissitudes of Families. Third Series. By Sir Ber- 
nard Burke, LL'.D. Ulster King of Arms. (Longman.) 

Sir Bernard Burke has, in this third volume, brought 
to a close the amusing work, in which, while treating of 
the Vicissitudes of Families and Titles, he has preached 
most eloquently on the text that " All is vanity." Sir 
Bernard indulges the hope that the book will not be 
deemed unworthy of a place in the student's library, as 
illustrating a peculiar and not uninteresting endroit in 
history. And the hope is one which will doubtless be 
realized ; but if the work was written with such a pur- 
pose, Ulster should have ensured such a result by giving 
us and no man knows better than Ulster their value 
both his precise authorities and a copious Index. 

Through Algeria. By the Author of " Life in Tuscany." 
(Bentley.) 

The fair writer of this amusing volume protests, in a 
preliminary " Plea for Lady Tourists," against being 
identified with the " Unprotected Female " and " Strong- 
minded Woman " of our witlings ; and manfully defends 
the right of English ladies of independent means, and 
without domestic ties, to travel through foreign countries 
in search of health, amusement, and information. We 
need not enter into that, question; but may well content 
ourselves with leaving her defence of her practice in her 
own hands, and give her the praise she deserves for the 
amusing little volume in which she describes Algeria and 
Algerine life. 



Alphabetical Dictionary of Coats of Arms belonging to 
Families in Great Britain and Ireland ; forming an Ex- 
tensive Ordinary of British Armorials upon an entirely 
new Plan. By John W. Papworth. Part X. (Published 
by the Editor.) 

"We congratulate Mr. Papworth and the subscribers to 
this work on the announcement by the Editor that, 
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more than one-half of the work is now issued. This 
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THE NATURAL HISTORY REVIEW, No. IX. 
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PRICED LIST, for which send a Penny Stamp, or twelve for the 
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TO AUTHORS, &c. W. FREEMAN is prepared 
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statement, see " Plans of Publishing, sent Free on receipt of One 
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London : WILLIAM FREEMAN, 102, Fleet Street, B.C. 



B 



EN RHYDDING, ILKLEY, YORKSHIRE. 

PHYSICIAN, DR. MACLEOD, F.R.C.P.E., F.A.S. Scot. 
SURGEON, THOMAS SCOTT, M.D. Edin., M.R.C.S.E. 

BEN RHYDDING is one of the most complete and most comfortable 
Establishments in England for the reception of patients and visitors. 

While the method of treatment pursued at Ben Rhydding proceeds 
on Hydrotherapeutics as to its main principle, it is by no means confined 
to that, but includes the systematic application of the art of cure in its 
whole range, and with all its resources. &, 



3rd s. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



21 



LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1863. 

CONTENTS. NO. 54. 

NOTES - The Complutensian Polyglot, 21- Highland 
Legends Unpublished, 22 Wentworth Letters, Ib. 
Crinoline at Paris, 1728, 23. 

MTTTOK TSToiES : Mathew Hem, Engraver Lock Inscrip- 
tion- Wickliffe - The Templars and their Christmas 
Bevels in 1627 -Early Mention of Oil Wells -Value of 
Foreign Degrees, 23. 

QUERIES The English Ape, 1588 Names of Anglo- 

^ Saxon Gods - Best Family - The Canons 9 f 1640 - " Clara 
Chester " &c. Crowle and Lowther Origin of Crockets 

Diminutive Cross-legged Figures Sir Francis Drake 
" The Fretful Lady " Keld Bishop Ken Escutcheon 
of Louis XIV. Leicester Fields Menander's Wit Pam- 
ment-brick Pitcairney Lawsuit Bight of creating 
Baronets Stamina Judge Street "And shall Tre- 
lawny die ? " Taking Time by the Forelock Sir Christo- 
pher Wren and the Ladies, 25. 

QUERIES WITH ANSWERS : Ancient Land-tenure Olde's 
" Acquital or Purgation of Edwarde the VI." Ac. Lich- 
gates Father Mansfield " History of the Siege of La- 
thom House," &c. " The Mirrour of State and Eloquence, 
or Bacon's Remaines" " Hoglandie Descriptio," 28. 

REPLIES : Printed Wills, 30 Bells at Pisa, 31 The 
Walkinshaws of Barrowfield, 32 Portlanders, Ib Owen 
Fitz-Pen, alias Phippen, a Melcombe Man, 33 Sir 
Thomas Prendergast Jenner Pedigree Capt. Richard 
p e j rce _Gherard Merman's "Boatman's Dialogues" 
Rev. Benjamin Way Quotation Roman and Saxon 
Antiquities Holyrood House "II faut vivre" 
Baptism of Church Bells : Shochtmadony Dr. John 
Askew Itinerary of Edward I. and II., &c. Mock Sun 

Name of the Royal Family of England, &c., 34. 
Notes on Books, &c. 



THE COMPLUTENSIAN POLYGLOT. 

IHE PRINTER AND SCHOLARS EMPLOYED BY CARDINAL 
XIMENES IN ITS PUBLICATION AND COMPILATION. 

The printer of this celebrated Polyglot was a 
person named John Brocar, son of Arnold William 
Brocar, belonging to a family that became illus- 
trious in the annals of Castilian printing. Gomez 
mentions the names of both father and son : 
"Audivi Joannem Brocariuin Compl. excussorem, 
Arnoldi Gulielmi Brocarii filium," &c. {De Rebus 
geslis Francisci Ximenii, ed. Alcala, 1569, fol. 
38.) The family seem to have been resident in 
Alcala de Henares ; but whether the father was a 
Spaniard by birth, or had been invited into Spain 
from Germany by Ximenes, I am unable to deter- 
mine. Can any of your readers give me some in- 
formation on the subject? The name " Brocar" 
seems to be of German origin, though Mr. Pres- 
cott, in his History of Ferdinand and Isabella, 
gives the name as if it were Italian "Broc- 
cario." 

The names of the illustrious scholars connected 
with the Polyglot are thus given by Gomez : 

" Accersivit (Ximenius) continue ad se homines utri- 
usque literature peritissimos, Demetrium Cretensem, 
natione Graecum ; Antonium Nebrissensem ; Lopidem 
Astunigam et Fernandum Pincianum, Grsecarum litera- 
rum et latinarum professores; Alphonsum, medicum 
Complutensem ; Paulum Coronellum ; et Alphonsum 
Zamoram, hebrsearum rerum consultissimos." (Folio 37.) 



Dr. Hefele, in his German Life of Cardinal 
Ximenes (ed. Tubingen, 1851), gives the list a 
little different from that of Gomez : 

"Die Manner, welchen er diese Arbeit anvertraute, 
waren der beruhmte oben genannte Aelius Antonius von 
Lebrija; der Grieche Demetrius Dukas aus Greta, von. 
Ximenes zum Professor der griechischen Sprache nach 
Alcala berufen ; der durch seine Streitigkeiten mit Eras- 
mus bekannte Lopez de Znniga (Stunica oder Astunica), 
und der hoch-adelige Nunez de Guzman (Pintianus), 
Professor zu Alcala und Verfasser vieler Commentare 
uber die Classiker. Diesen gesellte Ximenes drei ge- 
lehrte, zum Christenthum iibergetretene Juden bei, den 
Arzt Alphons von Alcala ; den Paul Coronell aus Segovia ; 
und den Alphons von Zamora, welcher insbesondere das 
hebra'ische Wb'rterbuch und die Grammatik fur das 
grosse Bibelwerk verfasste." (P. 116, xii. Hauptstuck.) 

It would be very interesting to know the his- 
tory of these illustrious scholars. Where can it 
be found ? I am aware that Mr. Prescott has 
given a few short notices of some of them in his 
History of Ferdinand and Isabella. In Spain, 
Clemencin and Munoz have, I believe, published 
valuable "illustrations" in the Memoirs of the 
Royal Academy of History, of the reign of Queen 
Isabella the Catholic, but I am unable to say 
whether the subject referred to is mentioned by 
them. Prescott also frequently refers to Nicolas 
Antonio's Bibliotheca Vetus, and also to his Bib- 
liotheca Hispana Nova (Matriti, 1783) ; but un- 
fortunately I have not these works by me. 

JOHN D ALTON. 

Norwich. 



THE SUPPOSED LOST MANUSCRIPTS, USED BY THE 
EDITORS OF THE COMPLUTENSIAN POLYGLOT. 

The following letter addressed to the Rev. 
William Green * by the great Catholic rationalist 
critic, Alexander Geddes, LL.D., as it bears 




bably unknown to many of your readers. 

If the story of the burning of the " membranas 
inutiles" be true, it is singular that -Dr. Geddes's 
correspondent did not mention it to him. If 
Geddes had heard of it when he wrote the fol- 
lowing letter, he would certainly have mentioned 

it: 

" London, July 26, 1787. 

" Kev. Sir, 

" Your Letter of the 23 d I received yesterday in- 
closed in one from M r Cubit of Norwich ; to whose care I 
shall direct this and a copy of my Appendix. 

" There is little doubt but that there are many valu- 
able MSS. in the East, especially in Upper Egypt: but 
the great difficulty is to get free access to them ; and 
even if that could be easily obtained, where is the man 

* Rector of Hardingham, co. Norfolk, late Fellow of 
Clare-Hall, Cambridge, B.A. 1737, M.A. 1741. Died 
October 1794, Gent's. Mag. vol. Ixiv. pt. n. p. 1060. 

f Vol. xcii. pt. i. p. 128. 



22 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



S. III. JAN. 10, V3. 



with abilities and resolution sufficient to undertake the 
expedition ? 

" A collation of the Greek MSS. of the O. T. in Europe, 
is the first of my earthly wishes. Why are not men of 
letters men of fortune ? Or why are not men of fortune 
men of letters? I have lately procured an exact catalogue 
of the MSS. at Vienna, which are 26 in number, and I 
daily expect one of those at Madrid. My friend there, 
has, at my request, been to explore the libraries at Al- 
cala; but could find none of the MSS. used by Ximenes 
in his Polyglott edition, except one Latin one of the 9th 
century, which I mean to have collated in particular 
passages. The same gentleman (a Canon of the Cana- 
ries) is now on a tour through the northern provinces 
of Spain, for the purpose of procuring me further in- 
formation of the same kind. 

" Dr. Hales, from Dublin, assures me that Bp. New- 
come's Ezekiel is nearly completed ; and will soon appear. 
Dr. Goodinge at Leeds has been for some years labouring 
on the Pentateuch, and purposes to publish, in a short 
time, the first book. 

" Although Michaelis's version reads well in German, 
it would not at all do in an English dress. It would ap- 
pear by far too free a paraphrase to ears so long accus- 
tomed to a servilely literal version. 

" I shall be happy to hear from you when you have 
read the Appendix, and am ever, Dear Sir, 

" Your most obedient servant, 

" A. GEDDES." 
K. P. D. E. 



HIGHLAND LEGENDS UNPUBLISHED. 

[I have endeavoured to give the following beautiful 
legend in a simple and appropriate metrical form J. L.] 

THE VISION AT THE SHEEPFOLD; 

A LEGEND OF THE HIGHLANDS. 

The night fell gloomy in the west ; 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
For snow clouds swept athwart the wold, 
As the Shepherd hied to the distant fold, 
To fetch a Lamb for the lykewake feast 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 

Slowly the rustic gate swung wide, 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
When a Stranger of majestic mien, 
In vesture clad of a dazzling sheen, 
The wondering Shepherd stood beside 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 
Serene his eyes, like stars of Night, ,.- 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
Dwelt on the Soul and a voice was heard 
Sweet, as when tinkling leaves are stirred 
By breath of Summer, ere prime of light 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 

" On the desolate moor, what dost thou here?" 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
" From the vigil of the Dead I come, 
Ere I lay my loved one in the tomb, 
To fetch a Lamb for the funeral cheer" 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 
" Twelve moons agone, the Mother mild," 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 



" Kissed four sweet Bairns, with locks of gold ; 
And now the last lies stark and cold, 
Yet smiling, as her dead Mother smiled " - 
Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 

" And are there murmurs and wild alarms," 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
" When the Lamb is snatched from the mother's 

side?" 

" Oh, the Sheep resist not," he replied ;] 
" And the Lamb lies passive in my arms," 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 

" How different, when a Lamb I bear," 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
" From mine own fold to a home of rest ; 
The Sheep, impatient, and sore distrest, 
Fill mine ears with murmurings there," 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 

Softly closed, without hand, the gate, 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
The Vision was gone ; but the Shepherd heard, 
And felt in his Soul it was the Lord ; 
Bidding him trust, and love, and wait 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 

Long years that lykewake feast is o'er, 

Alone, alone, how sad to be ! 
The grass is tall on the last-made grave ; 
But the hand that smites will also save, 
And He who taketh will restore, 

Dear Saviour, Jesus, pity me ! 

In the pleasant Land, where sorrows cease, 

Alone, alone, no more to be ! 
By crystal streams, along flowery meads, 
His Flock the heavenly Shepherd leads, 
To dwell for ever in joy and peace, 

Dear Saviour, Thou wilt pity me ! 

J. L. 
Dublin. 



WENTWORTH LETTERS. 

I send you transcripts of two original letters, in 
my possession, from Sir William Wentworth to 
John Wentworth, Esq., of Woolley Park, in 1678, 
which I thought might be worthy of a place in 
" N". & Q." Sir William was of the Stainborough 
branch of Wentworths ; lived at North Gate Head, 
in Wakefield ; was a privy councillor in Ireland ; 
was sheriff of Yorkshire in 24 Charles II. ; died 
in July, 1693. The letters relate to business 
about the Alburgh election, of which Mr. John 
was possessor. 

" 29 June, 78. 
" Deare S r , 

" I just now spoake with S r John, who telled me that 
M r Simpson spoake with him from M r Wortley, to tel 
him that he had persuaded him that great men did 
oppose him, and that he nether should be elected nor 
returned euer, nor should M r Wentworth : so that he bid 
him tel S r John he did decline it. I wish I had spoake 



3i S. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



23 



with S r John before, for now he doth not absolutely say 
that Adams shall be absent, but that he will indeuor 
to perswaid him, and hopes to doe it; and saith he 
said noe more to S' Philip, now y n are sure that my 
Cosen shall be returned and not the other. He saitb. 
ray Lord Treasorer hath writ to y" ; allso; now the 
Sherife wil lose noe fauor, and all will goe well, that 
vou shall and doe every thing y r owne way : haue as 
inanv Electors as you please, only he must haue y r letter 
before this be done ; and, therfor, write to me by the 
first post, that he shall not be molested ; and as soon as 
he seeth y^ letter he wil desist, as he designed this day 
senit. Now he goes downe upon Fryday, he designes 
Thursday senit for the day; but if he gites y r answer 
then before, I hope to receive it on Fryday. I feare the 
post ; may be we shall heare sooner, 

" Y r most affectionate 

" Cosen and seruant, 

" W. WENTWOKTH. 
(Seal in red wax, with the 

Wentworth arms.) 
" For John Wentworth, Esq., 

of Wolley. 

<; Let this goe to M r Wheallcy of Wakefield, to goe to 
Ferrybridge, Yorkshire. " Frank." 

" 14 June, '78. 

" S r , Because I am resolued not to mention one word of 
this business when I gee y v to-morrow evening, I thinke 
I ought here to vindicate this my acting; and to show 
my intentions was only to serue y w , I doe here assure 
yo u againe that the cause can not be tryed the next 
weake ; for as ther is 2 causes and actes same to be 
tryed before, yett one of w ch causes was 14 dayes, from 
the first day to the last, before ended, and Shresbury 
cause: so that if my cosen would not haue payed the 
charges of the coach I would ; but his next letters wil 
cleare this, at least y w wil find it, or else I shall not looke 
y w in tho face. The next and chief reason they should 
not haue gone up is, that since over maney doe concerne 
themselves, as it is a good cause, so if S r John had not 
cue voyce, and all the bribery in the world prouved 
against him, he would carry it this session, and so wil 
the Moonday letters tel y w : for as all this 179 will be to 
a man against y w , if so, of the 1G6 ther wil not be left in 
towne 140 by to-morrow sennit; so that I made this 
hast that, having such good excuses of the writt upon S r 
Solomons being outed, might cause them to stay the 
attending of it ; and ther has time and quickness, and 
the litle ther the next session, the cause would be tryed 
between my Cosen and S v Tho' Mai', and S r Thomases 
Peticon coming to b2 tryed first, y c leases being good and 
the princes not concerned, y e cause would come easily ; 
then this Peticon being deliuered the day after, would 
come to hearing, after ayd, be assuredly carried. This 
being sr> prudent and rationell, I dare appeall to all the 
world, nay y'rselfe when out of passion, if y w had beue a 
uerc parent I could haue advised better, and kept up a 
good right from perishing by rashness. This did cheifly 
put me to the Charges of this Jurney by the Advice of 
good friends, and I would not fail e "(to* the best of my 
skill) to have preserved y r right; w ch , if not the best, I 
cal God to Witness so thought by him, who is, alls-ough 
not yet understood, 

" Y* most faithfull, 

" And'humble seruant, 
" W. WENTWORTH. 

" I sent Harmon to Yorke last night to see y r wit 
nesses, and to see my cosen, Wood. My humble seruice 
to my Cozen and the'ladys. It is this Ruissel Wentwortl 
that hath prepossed us. God forgive him all his il 



ifHces to me ; but I shall beare the point to y w in short 
ime. Til then I do not blame y v , by noe meanes. 
" For John Wentworth, Esq., 

of Wolley." 

(Seal in black wax, with the 
Wentworth arms.) 

GEORGE WENTWORTH. 
Woolley Park. 



CRINOLINE AT PARIS, 1728. 

In the writings of the last century we meet 
with frequent allusions to the fashion then, as 
now, prevalent among the ladies, of wearing hoops. 
But in no passage, I think, is the said fashion placed 
in a more ridiculous light than in the following : 

; On ne croirait jamais que le Cardinal a ele embarasse 
par rapport aux paniers que les femmes portent sous 
leurs jupes pour les rendre larges et eVase'es. Us sont si 
amples qu'en s'asseyant cela pousse les^baleines, et fait 
un ecart ^tonnant, en sorte qu'on a te oblige de faire 
faire des fauteuils expres. II ne peut pas tenir plus de 
trois femmes dans les loges des spectacles, pour qu'elles y 
soient un peu a, leur aise. Cette mode est devenue ex- 
travagante, comme tout qui est extreme, de maniere que 
les princesses e'tant assises & cote' de la reine, leurs jupes, 
qui remontaient, cachaient celle de la reine. Cela a paru 
impertinent; mais le remede etait difficile, et & force de 
rever, le Cardinal a trouve qu'il y aurait toujours un 
fauteuil vide de chaque cote de la reine, ce qui 1'empe- 
cherait d'etre incommodee. On a pris pour pretexte que 
ces fauteuils etaient pour Mesdames de France." 

A little farther on : 

" L'histoire des paniers a eu des suites. Comme il y a 
eu de la distinction entre la reine et les princesses du 
sang, celles-ci ont voulu en avoir avec les duchesses, et 
de fait elles ont obtenu un tabouret vide entre elles. Cela 
a fort pique les dues, et il a couru, en cour, un e'crit 
tres-vif et tres-injurieux centre les princes du sang, qui a 
ete brule par la main du bourreau," etc. Barbier, Journal 
du Regne de Louis XV., i. 272-4. 

The men of the last century pleased themselves 
with the notion that these hooped petticoats 
served to protect the virtue of their wives and 
daughters ; but the husbands and fathers of the 
present age might exclaim, on the contrary, 
" Oft have we known that sevenfold fence to" fail ; 

Though stiff with hoops, and armed with ribs of 
whale." Pope. 

It is recorded of crinoline, that it once saved 
the life or honour (perhaps both) of a youthful 
empress, who sought refuge, within its circum- 
ference, from the violence of an insurgent mob. 
(Kelly's History of Russia, i. 198, chap, xvi.) 



MATHEW REM, ENGRAVER. In Bryan's Dic- 
tionary of Painters and Engravers, Stanley's edi- 
tion, 1858 (p. 625), there appears the following 
short notice : 



24 



NOTES AND QUEKIES. 



[3'* S. III. JAN. 10, '63. 



11 Mathew Rem, a German engraver, who flourished 
about the year 1635. According to Professor Christ, he 
engraved the plates for L 1 Architecture de Furttenbuch. 
He usually marked his prints with the initials of his 
name." 

The engraver's name is, in reality, Rembold. 
" Campan' pinxit, Matha?' Rembold' seri incidit," 
forms part of an inscription at the foot of the 
frontispiece, containing a portrait of the author, 
prefixed to the Ulm edition of Furttenbach's 
Architecture, 1635. Other plates in the same book 
are signed " M. Rem." and " M. Remb.," as well 
as"M.R." 

Having carefully examined the copy (in our 
Public Library), which has led to the present 
Note, and the "authority being so unimpeachable, 
I think it worth while to draw attention to this 
error in Bryan's useful compilation ; possessors of 
copies of which may easily rectify the incorrect- 
ness, and add the engraver's name in full, as it 
should be, according to the particulars now fur- 
nished. SIGMA-TAU. 
Cape Town, S. Africa. 

LOCK INSCRIPTION. Inscription on a lock of 
the seventeenth century : 
" If had y c gift of tongue, 
I would declare, and do no wrong, 
Who they are y* com by stealth, 
To impare my Lady's wealth. 

" JOHN WILKKS, 

"De Birmingham, fecit" 
Athenceum, 1847, p. 863. 

K. P. D. E. 

WICKLIFFE. In 1861, at a meeting of the 
Leicester Architectural and Archseological So- 
ciety, Mr. M. H. Bloxam, to the distress of many, 
read a paper showing that all the supposed relics 
of this eminent preacher were spurious, and of a 
much later date. The following extract com- 
pletely justifies his anticipations. In the course 
of the observations, he said : " This church (of 
Lutterworth) contains a variety of articles, which 
for years past, I know not how many, have been 
regarded as relics of WyclifFe." The following 
extract will decide the year since which the ar- 
ticles must have been introduced : 

" 1684, May 27. Over the hills by Daventry, a large 
market -town, to Lutterworth, where the famous Wickliff 
was parson, anno Dora. 1384, whose picture we see in 
the town, but no memorial in the church." Diary of 
Ralph Thoresby, 8vo, London, 1830, ii. 430. 

WYATT PAPWORTH. 

THE TEMPLAHS AND THEIR CHRISTMAS REVELS 
IN 1627. The author of the Reign of King 
Charles (London, 1655), has the following short 
Christmas tale about " a fray in Fleet Street," in 
which the Templars were interested. Under date 
of 1627, the said writer says : 

" That Christmas the Temple Sparks had enstalled a 
Lieutenant, a thing we country folk call a Lord of Misrule. 



This Lieutenant had on Twelfth Eve, late in the night, 
sent out to collect his rents in Ram me Alley and Fleet 
Street, limiting five shillings to every house. At every 
door they winded their Temple-horn ; and if it procured 
not entrance at the second blast or summons, the word 
of command was then ' Give fire, Gunner.' This gunner 
was a robustious Vulcan, and his engine a mighty smith's 
hammer. The next morning, the Lord Mayor of London 
was made acquainted therewith, and promised to be with 
them the next night ; commanding all that ward, and 
also the watch, to attend him with their Halberds. At 
the hour prefix!, the Lord Mayor with his train marched 
up in martial equipage to Ramme Alley. Out came the 
Lieutenant with his suit of Gallants, all armed in cuerpo. 
One of the Halberdiers bad the Lieutenant come to my 
Lord Mayor. ' No,' said the Lieutenant, ' let the Lord 
Mayor come to me.' But this controversy was soon 
ended, they advancing each to other till they met half- 
way ; then one of the Halberdiers reproved the Lieuten- 
ant for standing covered before the Lord Mayor. The 
Lieutenant gave so crosse an answer, as it begat as crosse 
a blow ; which the Gentlemen not brooking, began to 
lay about them : but, in fine, the Lieutenant was knockt 
down and sore wounded, and the Halberdiers had the 
better of the swords. The Lord Mayor being thus mas- 
ter of the field, took the Lieutenant and haled rather than 
led him to the Counter, and with indignation thrust him 
in at the prison gate; where he lay till the Attorney- 
General mediated for his enlargement, which the Lord 
Mayor granted, upon condition he should- submit and 
acknowledge his fault. The Lieutenant readily embraced 
the motion ; and the next day, performing the condition, 
so ended this Christmas Game." 

B. H. C. 

EARLY MENTION OF OIL WELLS. The remark- 
able oil wells which have been lately discovered 
in America, are not, we may presume, the only 
ones in existence. Strabo, in his Geography (book 
ii. part ii.), thus refers to one in Northern Asia : 

" It is said that in digging near the river Ochus, a 
spring of oil was discovered. It is probable that as cer- 
tain nitrous, astringent, and sulphurous fluids permeate 
the earth, greasy fluids may (also) be found ; but the 
rarity of their occurrence makes their existence almost 
doubtful." 

R. F. 

VALUE OF FOREIGN DEGREES. Have the 
holders of foreign degrees any kind of legal right 
to use such titles in this country, when granted, as 
they usually are, dignitatis causa. I extract the 
following from an original letter of Dr. Adam 
Smith to Dr. Cullen, and dated London, Sept. 
20th, 1774, in consequence (as it appears to me) 
of its extremely striking adaptation to existing 
circumstances, apposite, more especially, perhaps, 
to the noble and god-like profession of medicine, 
heterodoxy and orthodoxy being, in a medical 
sense, charmingly well fitted : 

"All Universities were ecclesiastical establishments, 
and under the immediate protection of the Pope ; a Doc- 
tor's degree from any one of them gave, all over Christen- 
dom, the same privileges, or nearly so, which a degree 
from any other could have given ; and the respect which 
is at this day paid to foreign degrees, even in Protestant 
countries, must be entirely regarded as a relic of homage 
to the sovereign author of titles the supreme head of 
the Catholic Church, the pontific Bishop of Rome ! This 



3'd s. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



25 



facility of obtaining a Doctor's degree is useful .; and I 
deny that it is hurtful in any way to the public. It 
serves as a corrective for what would otherwise speedily 
<m>w up to be a most intolerable nuisance ; viz. the 
bigoted and exclusive corporation spirit! Real honour is 
most effectually supported by resting upon liberal princi- 
ples, good sense and sound discretion being those desir- 
able qualities, for which no examination can give any 
the slightest security at all; and when a man has 
learned his lesson of life well, it surely can be of small 
moment where, or from whom, he has learned it. 

Quite so ! Who cares a rap for mere conven- 
tional location, or desires to have his feet for ever 
ensnared in the wily and restrictive fetters of a 
corporation cunning ? nay, rather, is not the art 
of healing a pure and intuitive Dei donum, alike 
independent of time or place, and alone to be 
practised as it should be PRO AMORE DEI ? 



THE ENGLISH APE, 1588. In 1588 appeared a 
pamphlet, by W. R - called The English Ape, of 
which the full title will be found in the new edi- 
tion of Lowndes, under the initials of the author. 
It seems to have been rather popular for a time, 
and two editions were printed in the same year. 
One of these purports to be " printed by Robert 
Robinson for Richard Jones, and are to be sold,'" 
&c. ; a copy is among Malone's books at Oxford 
The second, or, indeed, it may be the first (as it is 
impossible to ascertain the priority), has at the 
foot of the titlepage, " At London. Printed by 
Robert Robinson, dwelling in Feter Lane, neere 
Holborne." Of this impression or issue (as it 
may, perhaps, be), a copy is in private hands ; 
and the title page is among Bagford's singular 
collections (Harl. MS., 5019). What I wish to 
point out is, that in MR. COLLIER'S very interest- 
ing " Extracts from the Registers of the Sta- 
tioners' Company " (" N. & Q-," 2 nd S. xii. S, et 
seq.), there is no mention of any license of the 
English Ape, either to Robinson or Jones, and ] 
should therefore like to know whether the book 
was really entered, or whether it is allowable to 
presume that it was printed without the know- 
ledge and sanction of the company ? Perhaps, at 
his leisure, Mr. Collier will oblige me with this 
piece of information. W. CAREW HAZLITT. 

NAMES OF ANGLO-SAXON GODS. At p. 124 o 
the late Earl of Ellesmere's Guide to Northern 
Archeology, I find it stated that the volume fo 
1846 of the Transactions of the Society of Northern 
Antiquaries, contains, inter alia, 

" A fragment of an alliterative Anglo-Saxon homily, i_ 
which are named some of the heathen deities of the North 
taken from a Codex in the British Museum." 

Has this fragment been published in England . 
If so, in what publication ? What are thename 
of the gods so given in it ? C. 



BEST FAMILY. Can any of your readers inform 
me who is the present representative of the Bests 
f Allington Castle, in the county of Kent ? Ac- 
ording to the Visitation of Kent [by Philipott] 
n 1619, John Best, of Allington Castle, the son 
f Richard Best of Bibrook, by Dorothy his wife, 
laughter and co-heiress of John Barrow of Hinx- 
' ill, in the county of Kent, had numerous issue 
y his two wives, Anne, daughter of Laurence 
Brooke of Horton Monachorum, and Anne, 
daughter of Reginald Knatchbull of Saltwood 
Castle. His eldest son John was of the age of 
eventeen years at the time of Philipott's Visi- 
tation. 

The arms of Best and Barrow, quarterly, are 
iricked at the commencement of the pedigree. I 
am unable to ascertain when, and by whom, the 
Best and Barrow arms were granted. 

A copy of these grants in extenso would be 
much esteemed. J. J. H. 

THE CANONS or 1640. I have a copy of the 
original edition of these Canons, which, it is well 
known, were authorised by the king, and soon after 
abolished by the parliament. A publication so 
curious must have some bibliographical history, 
and my object in writing this Note is to ask 
where I can find any account of subsequent edi- 
tions. I have looked in Watt, and only trace an 
edition of 1641. B. H. C. 

" CLARA CHESTER," ETC. There was published 
at Edinburgh in 1823, by Oliver and Boyd, Clara 
Chester ; a poem, by the author of Rome, and 
The Vale of Chamouni. I gather from the poet's 
lively introduction, that he was a rambling soldier 
and engaged in the disastrous expedition to 
Buenos Ayres in 1807. Is his name known to 
any correspondent ? J. O. 

CROWLE AND LOWTHER. George Crowle of 
Hull is said to have married a Lowther of Swil- 
lington. I should be glad of more definite infor- 
mation. C. J. R. 

ORIGIN or CROCKETS. In Sir Christopher 
Wren's report to the Bishop of Rochester on 
the state of Westminster Abbey, printed in the 
Parentalia, p. 296, &c., he describes the spire he 
intended to have placed on the central tower, and 
says : 

"The angles of pyramids \_i. e. spires] in Gothic archi- 
tecture were usually enriched with the flower the bota- 
nists call calceolus, which is a proper form to help 
workmen to ascend on the outside to amend any defects, 
without raising large scaffolds upon every slight occa- 
sion." 

Is there any ground for these statements ? Sir 
Christopher was not a man to make assertions 
without sound reasons ; and it is said, particularly 
by the Freemasons, that he carefully preserved 
all the traditions of the old builders. The early 



26 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 10, '63. 



crockets certainly have no resemblance to this 
flower, though those of later date, which bulge so 
much, are not unlike to one cut in half when just 
breaking open. If the latter assertion be true, it 
wilt afford another proof of the desire of the 
Gothic architects to make all their detail and 
even their ornaments useful. I think I have 
heard of a man at Newcastle who used to ascend 
spires by the help of the crockets, to put the 
weather-cocks in order. Can any of your readers 
give me an account of the fact? A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 

DIMINUTIVE CROSS-LEGGED FIGURES. In Dr. 
Stukeley's Itinerary, vol. i. p. 74, on his visit to 
Tenbury, in Worcestershire, he describes 

" A niche in the chancel there, containing a 6gure a 
yard long, of a child of Lord Arundel of Sutton, as they 
say, dressed like a knight and cross-legged." 

Nash gives a fuller description : 

" Under an arch in the north wall of the chancel, 
somewhat raised from the ground, is the figure of a child 
in compleat armour and a surcoat ; between his hands, 
which are raised on the breast, a large heart ; his legs 
crossed, and at his feet a talbot." 

The church at Tenbury has suffered much 
from modern innovations. Several of its ancient 
monuments are literally incased in pews, and 
mutilated to accommodate their size to these 
erections of later times ; but happily this beautiful 
little figure remains nearly perfect under its 
canopied niche. Except the conjecture men- 
tioned by Stukeley, no record of its history has 
reached us. In a late number of the Archtzolog. 
Journal, there is an account of a diminutive figure 
at Abbey Dore, which the writer supposes to 
have been erected over the heart of Bishop Bru- 
ton. Nash alludes to a similar monument he had 
heard of at Maypowder in Dorset. 

What is the supposed history of this remark- 
able class of tombs ? They cannot, in the Abbey 
Dore case, represent children ; and the armour 
forbids the supposition in this beautiful example 
at Tenbury. 

Are there many other instances of these dimi- 
nutive figures in England ? The church at Ten- 
bury is about to be restored, and I trust this, its 
far most interesting feature, will receive the 
careful attention of the architect. 

E. WlNNINGTON. 



SIR FRANCIS DRAKE. Can any of your readers 
furnish a list of authentic portraits of this great 
naval commander ? I am desirous of knowing 
where existed the original which De Leu en- 
graved, and which has this inscription encircling 
it: 

" Franciscus Drake nobilissimus eques Anglicc An cat. 
sue 43." 

Underneath the following lines : 



" Habes lector candide fortiss. ac invictis. Ducis Draeck 
ad vivum imaginem, qui isto terrarum orbe duorum an- 
norum et mensium decem spatio zephyris faventibus 
circumducto, Angliam sedes proprias 4 Cal. Octobris, anno 
apartu virginis 1580, revisit, cum antea portu solvisset 
Id. Decemb. anno 1577. 

"Le vray portraict du cappitaine Draeck, lequel a 
circuit toute la terre en trois annees, moins deux mois et 
17 jours. II partit du royaulme d'Angleterre le 13 de 
Decembre, 1577, et fist son retour audict royaulme le 
26 jour de Sept. 1580. Ad amplissimum et illust. virum 
D.D. Edoardum Staffart apud Henr. o Christ. Franc. 
Regem legatum D.S. observantiss. Jo. Rabel pinxit ; 
Thomas de Leu sculpsit, et excudit a Paris." 

In this portrait Drake is represented with 
deeply furrowed lines on the forehead, having 
curling hair, but very thin at the temples, with a 
mouth evincing much determination, giving the 
idea of a weather-beaten sea-captain. 

A very similar portrait, at least as to the cos- 
tume, is prefixed to the expedition of 1585, 
printed at Leyden, 1588 ; the engraver is marked 
there as " Paulus de la Houue excudit." 

So much doubt has been thrown upon portraits 
engraved by Dutch artists, who are known in 
many instances to have made a plate serve for 
likenesses of more than one individual by some 
slight alterations, that I feel desirous of ascer- 
taining how far reliance may be placed upon this 
identical portrait, which is among the Rawlinson 
MSS. at Oxford. ABRACADABRA. 

"THE FRETFUL LADY." I have in my pos- 
session an unfinished miniature by Cooper, on the 
back of which is written, in a contemporary hand, 
" The Fretful Lady." I have not been able to 
find, in any memoirs of the time, mention made 
of a person with this sobriquet. 

Could any of your readers inform me who 
" The Fretful Lady " might be ? C. S. 

KELD. In the North Riding of Yorkshire the 
word Keld, meaning a well, is commonly found in 
the name of a spring of water, but always fol- 
lowed by well. Thus in Manfield parish, is Lady- 
keld-well; in Scorton, Cuddy- (i. e. Cuthbert) 
held- well; and at the south-west corner of Mid- 
dleham Moor, Wray-keld-well. When did the 
word held become obsolete, or (in other words) 
what is the latest period at which held is found 
without the adjunct well? G. O. W. 

BISHOP KEN. Ken's Manual of Prayers for 
the Use of the Winchester Scholars, with the Three 
Hymns. Can any of your correspondents kindly 
inform me whether there were any editions of the 
above published between 1705 and 1712 ? And 
if so, the different dates ? There is a considerable 
variation in the text of the Morning, Evening, and 
Midnight Hymns in the edition of 1712, as com- 
pared with the editions of 1697, 1700, and 1705, 
which are all alike; and as Ken died in 1710 
[1711], the writer is wishful to know when the 



3* s. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



27 



alterations were made ? If they were not made 
in Ken's lifetime, by whom was the text altered ? 
In The Life ofBishopKen, by a Layman, 1854, the 
"Three Hymns" are given exactly as in the 
earlier editions of the Manual, 1697, 1700, and 
1705 ; but other modern editions print the hymns 
from the 1712 and later editions.* G. W. N. 

ESCUTCHEON OF Louis XIV. Mr. Mathew 
Lumsden's editor, in his entertaining introduction 
to the Genealogy of the House of Forbes, says, 
apropos of people not being too vain of their 
descent, " Even Louis XIV. in all his glory had 
a blank, or, as heralds call it, a window, in his 
scutcheon." Was this the case? and through 
what line of his descent did the window come ? 

2. . 

LEICESTER FIELDS. Your correspondent DR. 
RIMBAUJLT, who appears to have the works on 
this locality at hand, can perhaps readily inform 
me where the house was, or is, situate, that was 
built for Sir Philip Parker Long about 1730. 

W. P. 

MENANDER'S WIT. 

" The Roman imitation, combined with the numerous 
and sometimes considerable fragments, are sufficient to 
give us a clear conception of a comedy of Menander, in 
its general plan and in its details. A person who pos- 
sessed the peculiar talents requisite for such a task, and 
had acquired by study the acquaintance with the Greek 
language, and the Attic subtlety of expression necessary 
for the execution of it, might without much difficulty 
restore a piece of Menander's so as to replace the lost ori- 
ginal." Muller's History of the Literature of Ancient 
Greece, p. 439. London, 1847. 

"Did the Greeks, and, above all, the unsteady and im- 
pulsive Athenians, permit the decorum which art demands 
to quench, or even unduly to damp, the genuine fire of 
passion ? We think not ; and among our reasons for ques- 
tioning the grounds of this assertion are the entire play 
of the Bacchanals, the rapid movements and almost modern 
variety of the Rhesus, the intense interest attendant on 
the evolutions of King (Edipus, the passion of Medea a 
fable suited to every stage and to every nation and, 
lastly, those transcendant scenes in the second half of the 
Agamemnon, from the moment when the King of Men is 
drawn on in his chariot to that in which the Chorus and 
the guilty pair, ^Egisthus and Clyteoinestra, hurl defi- 
ance at each other. The scholar requires not any re- 
miniscence of these scenes, or of the suspense and solemn 
agony of Electra, of Antigone, of the opening and the 
closing acts of the Eumenides, or of the superhuman woe 



[* We maj* as well state that since the second edition 
of The Life of Bishop Ken, by a Layman, 1854, was pub- 
lished, the British Museum has been presented with a 
copy of the first edition of Ken's Manual, 12mo, 1674, 
which does not appear to have been seen by Mr. Ander- 
don when he wrote his admirable work. The reading of 
the title-page varies from the entry as quoted by him 
(at p. 107, edit. 1854), from Robert Clavel's Catalogue. 
It reads as follows : A Manual of Prayers for the Use of 
the Scholars of Winchester Colledge [arms of William of 
Wykeham]. London, Printed for John Martyn, 1674. 
Pp. 69. The Three Hymns are found for the first time in 
the seventh edition, 1700. ED,] 



and endurance of Prometheus. If, after these instances 
have been fairly weighed and adjudicated upon, without 
reference to the very different genius of the modern 
drama, they shall be pronounced wanting in passion, 
there will then be room and pretext for asking whether 
Aristophanes possessed humour or Menander wit?" 
Saturday Review, Sept. 6, 1862, p. 282. 

Public admiration, and the testimony of sound 
judges, who had read his works, forbid us to dis- 
pute Menander's excellence. What evidence have 
we of his wit ? FITZHOFKINS. 

Garrick Club. 

PAMMENT- BRICK. This word occurs in several 
old books on building. What is its meaning ? 

A. R. I. B. A. 

PITCAIRNET LAWSUIT. A Mr. Grant, a Scotch 
lawyer, managed this " famous lawsuit" during the 
last century. What was the case, and who was 
Mr. Grant ? 2. 0. 

RIGHT OF CREATING BARONETS. The first 
Earl of Stirling had peculiar privileges conferred 
upon him by James and Charles in connection 
with the colony of Nova Scotia, which he es- 
tablished and governed. The late claimant of the 
earldom created Thos. Christopher Banks, the 
genealogical writer, a Baronet of Nova Scotia. 
I desire to know whether the power to do so was 
ever extended to the first earl ; or whether 
similar power has at any time been exercised by 
a subject ? Where is Banks' s patent ? its date, 
&c. ? And is his the only known instance ? 

S.T. 

STAMINA. How came this word to be used 
to denote healthy vigour, or strength of consti- 
tution ? Always, too, as a singular noun ? One 
chiefly hears the word, I think, from people of a 
certain age, and it seems to be rather going out 
of fashion. I had often observed that one never 
found the term used by medical writers ; but no 
rule without, an exception and in the British 
and Foreign Medico- Chirurgical Review for Octo- 
ber of this year (p. 286), the English are said to 
be superior to the Russians in stamina, A botanist 
may truly describe one flower as having more 
stamina than another; but how can this be asserted 
of a human being ? JAYDEE. 

JUDGE STREET. Nash, the historian of Wor- 
cestershire, states that Sir Thomas Street, to 
whom there is a marble monument, with eulogis- 
tic inscription, in Worcester Cathedral, erected by 
Edward Combe, had a granddaughter living about 
the year 1749. Sir Thomas Street married Pene- 
lope, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Rowland 
Berkeley of Cotheridge, but by her had no family. 
Can any of your readers inform me if he had a 
wife before this marriage; and if so, who the 
lady was ? M. N. 



28 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 10, '63. 



" AND SHALL TRELAWNY DIE ?" Would C. J. P 
be so good as to give, per " N. & Q.," a copy o 
the nursery version of " Shall Trelawny die ' 
which he says still exists at Bristol ? C. 

TAKING TIME BY THE FORELOCK. Having been 
requested, by the Rev. J. Erskine Clarke, to design 
a drawing wherewith to illustrate an editoria 
paper on the above subject in The Parish Maga 
zine for January, 1863; and also being asked 
" What was the origin of this proverbial saying ? ' 
and being unable to reply thereto, except to pleac 
ignorance, I very naturally turned to that invalu- 
able repertory of knowledge, " N. & Q.," feeling 
sure that it would enlighten our ignorance. But 
although receiving the valuable aid of the two 
General Indices to the two series, I cannot fine 
the slightest reference to, or mention of, the above 
saying ; and nothing nearer to it (by way of illus- 
tration) than the discussion on the hexameter 
verse, "Fronte capillataV' &c. (1 st S. i. 427; iii 
8, 43, 92, 124, 140, 286 ; 2 nd S. vi. 290.) Neither 
is it given in Kelly's Proverbs of all Nations (2nd 
ed., 1861). Nor can I find it mentioned in such 
books as Hone's Every-day and Table Books, 
Chambers's Book of Days, Taylor's Old Sayings, 
Martyndale's Calendar of Popular Customs, &c. I 
therefore now beg to ask, in these pages, the fol- 
lowing questions : What was the origin of the 
above saying ? by what early writers has it been 

USed? CUTHBERT BEDE. 

SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN AND THE LADIES. 
In the Parentalia (p. 211) is a letter from France, 
in which Wren complains, 

" The women, as they make here the language and 
the fashions, and meddle with politics and philosophy, so 
they sway also in architecture. Works of filgrand'and 
little trinkets are in great vogue, but buildings ought 
certainly to have the attribute of eternal." 

In a letter to the Commissioners for building 
St. Paul's, who had desired to have an orna- 
mented balustrade at the top, he says : 

" I take leave first to declare I never designed a balus- 
trade. Ladies think nothing well without an edging. I 
should have gladly complied with the vulgar taste, but 
I suspended for the reasons following." 

Are these merely general remarks, or are they 
pointed at any person in particular ? The tone of 
the last document would lead us to suppose the 
latter. By "filgrand" probably what we call 
J' filagree " is meant. Is this word to be found 
in any other author ? A. A. 



ANCIENT LAND-TENURE. Some years ago cir- 
cumstances brought me acquainted with the con- 
stitution of a parish in Cambridgeshire, that of 



Over, near St. Ives, the character of which as I 
was no antiquary appeared to me not a little 
remarkable. I have since met with a somewhat 
similar example in the Archaeological Journal; 
but whether the case of Over deserves further in- 
quiry, I leave to your readers to determine. To 
enable them to judge, I will state as much of it as 
remains in my memory. 

The parish or manor mainly consisted of three 
large tracts, all unenclosed. The first, arable, 
was required, by custom, to be cultivated in each 
year in one stated kind of crop. The second, also 
arable, might be cropped according to the various 
owners' pleasure. The third, a vast open pasture, 
owned in various and rather small portions, which 
were cut yearly by each owner for hay ; but the 
whole grazed as common of pasture by the cattle 
of all the commoners between appointed days. 

There were besides ancient homesteads, or sites 
of such, each conferring a right of common. The 
number I forget ; it was some multiple of 4, 
say 48, and there were also just as many ancient 
enclosures, 4 acres each of old pasture, as there 
were common rights ; that is, on this supposition, 
48 of such enclosures, apparently indicating an 
ancient allocation of 4 enclosed acres to each 
family of original settlers. If so, a proportionate 
allotment to each in the arable fields also might 
be presumed ; but changes of ownership may well 
have prevented its detection at the present day. 

A remarkable peculiarity existed in some of the 
unenclosed pasture ownerships : a defined portion 
would interchange yearly with another portion ; 
that is, the property in each, of each of the two 
owners (being in fact the right to cut hay) would 
shift from one owner to the other in yearly alterna- 
tions. Thus, if A. mowed Whiteacre this year, 
and B. Blackacre ; next year A. would cut Black- 
acre, and B. Whiteacre, the interchange being 
always between the same two portions ; and this 
singular ownership being^of a freehold, or at least, 
a heritable nature. 

There was as usual a Lord of the Manor, and 
a number of officers were appointed yearly in 
the Manor Court, such as a pinner, a hay-ward, 
&c. An enclosure act swept away this state of 
things some years back, and all evidence of it is 
on the point of perishing; but if any of your 
readers resident near Over would desire to inves- 
igate and record the facts more exactly, I could 
direct them to certain quarters where the mate- 
rials might be found. H. G. 

[In the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth centuries, 
he system of " Common Field " very generally pre- 
vailed. The lands, exclusive of the demesne lands, were 
requently divided into three portions: "Trinity Fields," 
ne fallow, and the other two in succession crops. These 
were apportioned respectively among the tenants of the 
manor, presenting the appearance of one open field di- 
vided into three strips ; sometimes the division was into 
two strips only. 



3rd g. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUEKIES. 



29 



Mr. Morgan in his England under the Norman Occupa- 
tion, p. 87, observes : 

"The system of common field is so nearly obsolete, 
that it may be well to insert a few descriptions of unen- 
closed parishes from the Reports to the Board of Agricul- 
ture It may seem a long step to pass from the reign of 
Henry III. to the reign of George III., and yet Mr. 
Delisle assures us that there was little advance or change 
of any kind in Norman agriculture in the course of eight 
centuries, and I fear that as much might be said of 
England During the last years of the last cen- 
tury, the parish of Stewkley afforded the best example 
in Buckinghamshire of the open field system of culti- 
vation. Stewkley was then a village of farmers and 
labourers upon an eminence, environed by three extended 
fields ; the one fallow, the second wheat, and the third 
beans; and the main roads running through the fields 
could not be readily distinguished by a stranger from the 
driftways leading to the different properties." 

Nothing is more common in feoffments of the thirteenth, 
fourteenth, and fifteenth centuries, than to find the land 
the subject of the feoffment, described as lying in 
."campo" (i. e. the "common field") or "campis," &c., 
A. or B. (naming the parish) with its particular abut- 
ments, as separating the portion of one owner from that 
of another, specifically set out.] 

OLDE'S " ACQUITAL OR PURGATION OF EDWARDE 
THE VI." ETC. In Mr. James D. Haig's List of 
Books printed in England, prior to the Year MD (?., 
in the Library of the Kings Inns, Dublin (1858), 
p. 14, 1 find the following entry : 

" Olde (John). The acquital or purgation of the moost 
catholyke christen prince, Edwarde the VI. Kyng of Eng- 
lande, Fraunce, and Irelande, &c., and of the Churche of 
England refourmed and gouerned vnder hym, agaynst al 
suche as blasphemously and traitorously infame hym or 
the sayd church, of heresie or sedicion. [By John Olde.] 
Emprinted at Waterford, the 7 daye of Nouembre, 1555. 
8." 

Will you oblige me with a few particulars of 
this volume, which, as stated in Lowndes' Biblio- 
grapher's Manual (Bonn's ed.), p. 1721, is the 
work of John Bale, and is " supposed to be the 
second book printed in Ireland ? " I have never 
seen a copy. -May I likewise ask what is the title, 
and what the date, of the first book printed in Ire- 
land ? ABHBA. 

[ The Acquital or Purgation of the moost Catholyke Chris- 
ten Prince, Edwarde the VI. by John Olde, may be con- 
sidered as a defence of the Reformed Catholic Faith, and 
the writing of this work was occasioned from the preachers 
of England in Queen Mary's time, in their sermons at 
St. Paul's Cross, and in other pulpits, " spewing out," 
as the author expresseth it, " with scolding, roaring, and 
railing, the poison of antichrist's traditions, and infaming 
the order, form, and use of preaching, prayers, and ad- 
ministration of the holy sacraments, set forth and exer- 
cised by common authority in the Church of England, 
reformed under the government of Edward VI. and vilely 
slandering of his father King Henry VIII. for banishing 
the violent usurped power and supremacy of the Romish 
ancient antichrist for his brother's known wife, and for 
taking justly upon him the title and estate of supremacy, 
incident and appertaining, by the undoubted ordinance of 
God, to his regal office and imperial crown." John Olde 
was presented by the Duchess of Somerset to the vicarage 
of Cubington, co. Warwick, and was a prebendary of 



Lichfield. In the reign of Queen Mary he became an 
exile for religion. For notices of him consult Strype's 
Works (see Index), and Becon's Works, published by the 
Parker Society. Dr. 'Cotton (Typog. Gazetteer, p. 321, ed. 
1831) doubts if printing was exercised at Waterford so 
early as 1555. The earliest work printed in' Ireland was 
The Boke of Common Prayer, imprinted bv Humfrev 
Powell, 1551. See " N. & Q." 2a S. vii. 48.] * 

LICH-GATES. Why called Trim-Trams in 
some parts of Devon and Cornwall, in which 
English counties, and in Wales, they mostly pre- 
vail ? (See Church Builder, No. 2.) The terms 
would appear to have more significance than a 
nickname, as there suggested. Did the bearers, 
halting at the " church style," change places or 
give place to another set, by which the corpse 
was carried into church and to the grave ? Such 
supposition agrees with the meaning of the first 
part of the compound word. But what of the 
second, which I can find neither in Bosworth, 
Bailey, Johnson, nor Walker (the only diction- 
aries I have at command). With tram-ways, i. e. 
the primitive railways of the iron and coal dis- 
tricts, I am of course acquainted. R. L x M. 

[We quite agree with our correspondent in thinking 
that the term Trim-Tram, as applied to a Lich-gate, is 
not to be taken as a mere nickname. Tram, as an old 
word, bore several meanings. It was a train. Trim- 
Tram, therefore, may have been Trim-Train, i. e. the 
halting place at the entrance of the churchyard where 
the train, that is, not only the pall, but the whole funeral 
party, might be trimmed, or duly adjusted and brought 
into'proper order, so as to be in a state of preparation for 
the officiating minister, on his coming forth to meet them 
there, and commence the burial service. Tram, also, 
was and is a car mounted on wheels ; so that if the bier 
or feretrum were so mounted, this idea might also be 
comprehended in the term Trim-Tram.] 

FATHER MANSFIELD. I want information con- 
cerning the family and birthplace of Father Mans- 
field, Doctor of the College of English Jesuits at 
Rome, A.D. 1699. He is mentioned in the edition 
of Pepys's Diary, published by Colburn in 1854, 
in a letter from J. Jackson to Samuel Pepys, 
dated Dec. 25th, 1699. Also, whether Father 
Mansfield's work on St. Peter's, alluded to by 
Pepys in a letter to Jackson, dated Feb. 8th, 
1699-1700, were ever published? If published, 
where is it to be seen ? R. M. 

[In Dr. Oliver's Biography of the Scotch, English, and 
Irish Members of the Society of Jesus, 8vo, 1845, the name 
is spelt Manfield. It is there stated that " Robert Man- 
field was son of Count Manfield ; aggregated himself to 
the English Province 24 October, 1669 ; was Rector of 
the English College at Rome from 1699 to 1704. He 
died at Nanci, 21 Sept 1708, aged fifty-six." We have 
not been able to trace the work noticed by Pepys.] 

" HISTORY or THE SIEGE or LATHOM HOUSE," 
ETC. Is there any evidence to show who wrote 
the Histories of the Sieges of Lathom House, of 
Bolton, and of Liverpool, in the year 1644, printed 
in Seacome's History of the House of Stanley 



30 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[S r <i S. III. JAN. 10, 'C3. 



(4to, 1741, Knowsley Library), and are the ori 
ginal manuscripts known to exist ? F. R. R. 
[" The Siege of Lathom House " in Seacorae's History i 
attributed to Samuel Rutter, consecrated Bishop of Sodo 
and Man, March 24, 1661. See the Gentleman 'sMagazin 
for April, 1823, p. 299, which also contains some notice 
of the MS. of Capt. Edward Halsall's Account of th( 
Siege in the Ashmolean Museum, A. Wood MSS. D. 16 
printed separately in 8vo, 1823, and in the European 
Magazine, vol. xxiii., and, lastly, as an Appendix to Ladj 
Hutchinson's Memoirs of Col. Hutchinson in Bohn'i 
Standard Library, 1846.] 

" THE MIBBOUB OF STATE AND ELOQUENCE, OB 
BACON'S REMAINES : " quoted in a note to the 
English Dedication of the Rev. Evan Evans's 
Welsh Sermons, 1776. Is The Mirrour of State 
and Eloquence a separate and distinct work from 
Bacon's Rcmaines, or are there some editions of 
Bacon's Remaines which bear the above title ? 
My copy, which is dated 1648, has its title as fol- 
lows, viz. The Eemaines of the Right Honorable 
Francis, ffc. LLALLAWG. 

The Mirrour of State and Eloquence (Lond. 1656, 4to), 
according to Lowndes, contains pp. 103, with title and 
contents three leaves. The running title, however, is 
Bacon's Remaines.'] 



DESCBIPTIO." Has the Latin 
poem, entitled XoipoxcapoypaQia : give, Hoglandice 
Descriptio, printed in 1742, been translated into 
English verse or prose, and printed ? If so, by 
whom and when, and where was it printed ? 

LLALLAWG. 

[Hoglandice descriptio, by Maredydias Caduganus Pym- 
lymmonensis [who was he?] was first published in 1709, 
in retaliation of Edward Holdsworth's Muscipula. In 
1711, it was "Imitated in English," London, 8vo. A 
copy of the translation is in the Bodleian.] 



PRINTED WILLS. 
(3 rd S. ii. 341, 403, 434.) 

The wills of the following persons have been 
printed : Grandisson, Bp. of Exeter ; Rob. de 
Vere (1369) ; Baldwin de Vere (1424) ; Ric. 
Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick and Aumarle ; Joh. 
Stafford, Earl of Wiltshire; Sir Oliver Man- 
nyngham ; Roger Drury, Esq. (1483-4) ; Rob. 
Wulcy, of Ipswich (father of the Cardinal) ; Abp. 
Rotherham ; Edward Stafford, Earl of Wiltshire ; 
Sir Hen. Vere, of Addington ; Sir Will. Carewe ; 
Nic. Bohun (1504); Sir Joh. Mordaunt; Joh. 
Gardener, of Bury St. Edmunds (father of the 
Bishop) ; Everard Digby, of Stoke Dry (1508-9) ; 
Joh. Bohun (1511); Will. Grocyn, the great 
Greek scholar; Sir Roger Drury; Joh. Rooper, of 
Eltham ; Sir Mat. Cradock ; Erasmus; Lady Kath. 
Gordon ; Piers Butler, Earl of Ormond and Os- 
sory; Sir Tho. Pope; Sir Will. Drury (1557); 



John, first Lord Mordaunt ; Sir Tho. Rowe, Al- 
derman of London ; John, second Lord Mordaunt ; 
Anth. Forster, of Cumnor (Tony Fire-the-Fag- 
got); Joh. Caius, M.D. ; Sir Tho. Gresham ; 
Geste, Bishop of Sarum; Tho. Tusser, the poet; 
Tho. Bassandyne, of Edinburgh, printer ; Mrs. 
Joyce Frankland ; Sir Joh. Perrot ; Lewis, Lord 
Mordaunt ; Leon. Pilkington, D.D. ; Gabr. Good- 
man, D.D. ; Mat. Button, Archbishop of York ; 
Secretary Davison ; Henry, Lord Mordaunt ; Sir 
Will. Romney, Alderman of London ; Joh. John- 
stoun, principal of St. Andrew's ; Tho. Sutton, 
founder of Charterhouse ; Will. Barlow, Bishop of 
Lincoln ; Sir Nic. Mosley, Alderman of London ; 
Sir Hen. Warner, of Mildenhall, Suffolk; Sir 
Alex. Barlow (1617); Sir Tho. Knyvet ; Nic. 
Ferrar, Citizen and Skinner of London ; Geo. 
Ruggle, M.A.; Dame Eliz. Mosley; Tho. White, 
D.D., founder of Sion Coll. ; Joh. Kendrick, citi- 
zen of London ; Bp. Andrewes ; Sir Tim. Hutton ; 
Tho. Hobson, of Cambridge, carrier ; Sir Alex. 
Barlow (1631); Ric. Sibbs, D.D. ; Tho. Goad, 
D.D., Rector of Hadleigh ; Tho. Jackson, D.D., 
President of Corp. Chr. Coll., Oxon ; Joh. Boise, 
Canon of Ely ; Sir Tho. Rowe, Chancellor of the 
Order of the Garter ; Mary, Princess Dowager of 
Orange ; Archbp. Bramball ; Humphr. Bohun 
(1670) ; Herb. Thorndike, Canon of Westminster ; 
Joh. Oxenbridge, sometime Fellow of Eton ; Isaac 
Basire, D.D. ; Bp. Gunning; Rev. Mat. Robin- 
son : Izaak Walton ; Ralph Widdrington, D.D. ; 
Will. Hulme, Esq., the great benefactor to Bra- 
senose Coll. ; Anth. a Wood ; Ralph Bathursr, 
M.D. ; Dame Mary Sadleir; Bp. Ken; Sam. 
Cripps, D.D. ; Tho. Baker, B.D., the Cambridge 
antiquary ; William Broome, LL.D. ; Ric. Walker, 
D.D. ; Tho. Gray, the poet ; Will. Hayes, Mus. 
Doct. ; Will. Hunter, M.D. ; Mat. Greg. Lewis ; 
Shute Barrington, Bishop of Durham. 

The foregoing persons were more or less 
eminent. I have also notes of above a thousand 
printed wills in addition to the above, and exclu- 
sively of those which have been noted in your 
columns. 

If MB. NICHOLS will undertake to prepare a 
ist of printed wills for The Herald and Genealogist, 
[ will gladly communicate my notes to him. I 
Delieve such a list would occupy above ten pages 
of" N. & Q.," and I consider that your miscellany 
may be more usefully occupied. 

A few of the wills mentioned in " N. & Q." 
lave been printed in other publications, besides 
hose pointed out by your correspondents. 

In at least two instances, Sir Harris Nicolas 
gave only abstracts of wills in Testamenta Vetusta, 
eing obviously unaware that the wills had been 
reviously printed in extenso. C. H. COOPER.* 
Cambridge. 



[* Mr. Cooper's additions reached U3 too late for inser- 
'on in the present Number. ED.] 



3'< l S. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



31 



The following may be inserted in the list of 
published wills : 

1486. William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester. Chan- 
dler's Life of Waynflete, p. 379. 
1523. William Pope, of Dedington, father of Sir Thomas 

Pope, founder of Trin. Coll., Oxon. Warton's 

Life of Pope, p. 265. 
1556. Sir Thomas Pope (summary only). Warton's Life 

of Pope, p. 158. 
1607. Sir John Croke, of Chilton, Bucks. Sir Alex. 

Croke's Genealogical History of the Croke 

family, vol. ii. Appendix, p. 826. 
1653. Henry King, Bishop of Chichester. Poems and 

Psalms, by Hen. King, edited by Rev. John 

Hannah, 1843, p. cviii. 
1662. Robert Sanderson, Bishop of Lincoln. Sanderson's 

Works, edit. Jacobson, 1854, vol. vi. pp. 342 

345, 404. 
1669. Anne, widow of Bishop Sanderson. Sanderson' 

Works, vol. vi. p. 413. 

1683. Izaak Walton. Complete Angler, 1808, p. 57. 
1695. Anthony k Wood. Ecclesiastical History Society' 

Life of Wood, edited by Ph. Bliss, 1848, p. 334. 
1729. Thomas Hearne, antiquary. Lives of Leland 

Hearne and Wood, 1772, vol. i. p. 125. 
1741. John Hough, Bishop of Worcester. Wilmot's Lif< 

of Hough, p. 98. 

C. F. W. 



The following may be added to the lists of wills 
which have already appeared in print : 

1441. John Carpenter, Town Clerk of London. (Trans 
lation.) Brewer's Life of Carpenter, 131. 

1456. Katherine Carpenter, wife of the preceding. Ibid 

145. 

1457. Ditto. Another will. Ibid. 152. 

1520. William Pope, father of Sir Thomas Pope, founder 
of Trinity College, Oxford. Warton's Life o 
Sir Thomas Pope, 2nd edition, 265. 
1550. Robert Parret (or Perrot), Organist of Magdalen 
College, Oxford. Bloxam's Magdalen College 
Register, ii. 184. 

1683. Izaak Walton. Complete Angler, 8th edition, 60, 
1687. Ellen Gwynne. Preface to first edition of Douglas 

Jerrold's comedy of Nell Gwynne, v. 
1720. Rev. Stephen Nicoles, Clerk of Magdalen College, 
Oxford. Bloxam's Magdalen College Register, 
ii. 80. 
1723. Rev. Samuel Cripp?, D.D., Rector of Appleton, co. 

Berks. Ibid. i. 99. 
1734. Thomas Hetcht, Organist of Magdalen Collese, 

Oxford. Ibid. ii. 208. 
1759. George Frederick Handel. Schcelcher's Life of 

Handel. 

1776. William Hayes, Mus. Doc. Professor of Music in 
the University of Oxford. Bloxam's Magdalen 
College Register, ii. 215. 

1803. Joseph Ritson. Sir Harris Nicolas's Life of him. 
1818-23. Joseph Nollekens, Sculptor. J. T. Smith's Nol- 
lekens and his Times, ii. 

W. H. HUSK. 



In An Excursion down the Wye from Ross to 
Ckepstow, there is printed the will of Wm. Jones, 
haberdasher, of London, and founder of areat 
charities at Monmouth, dated 1614. R, I F 



BELLS AT PISA. 
(3 rd S. ii. 387, 496.) 

Through the kindness of a friend I am able to 
give the inscriptions on these celebrated bells. 
On the largest, in Roman capitals, "Assumpta est 
Maria in Crelum, Gaudent Angeli laudantes, Be- 
nedicamus Dominum, A.B. M.D.C.L.I.V. Joan Pe- 
trus de Orlandis." 

There are also a Madonna, a shield with the 
arms of the Medici, a large embossed cross, and 
two bands with foliage. 

On the second, in Lombardic characters, " Lot- 
teringus Pepisis me fecit, Ceradus (probably Ge- 
radus) Hospitularius solvit, A.D. M.C.C.L.X.II." 
There are some small rosettes round the bell, 
some small circles containing a bull and a swan, 
and two small angels, all in bas-relief. On each 
side " Ave Maria G. P." 

On the third, the inscription is written backwards, 
" Francesco Ourantotto JDdile A.S. M.D.C.C.XXXT. 
More Pis." Above this, " Religioni modo, ac Divo 
Raynerio Patrono Juri Praatoris Olim." Below, 
read forwards, " Petrus. Franc. Bertt. Lucensis 
Fudit." In different parts of the bell, " o. R. JE.," 
shields with the Medici arms, with a cross flory, with 
a cross between two animals, with a band between 
four etoiles, and some bands with masks and fruit. 

On the third bell in Roman capitals, on one 

side the monogram of Constantine, ^; below 

which is, " Servatoris Honori et Gloria et Patriae 
Incolumitate restituta Comite Francesco Alex- 
andro del Testa De Tiniosa De Gambaccortis 
JEdituo ANNO D. cio -. 10 - ccc - x VITI. ; " and below 
" Santo Gualandio, Pratensi, 2Eri, Flando, Feri- 
undo." 

On the fourth bell 

" Santi Gualandio Domiciliato in Prato 

0. P. M. 
Oriundi . di . Treppio Fuso e 1'anno 181S.' r 

with some running ornaments. 

On the fifth, in Roman characters 

" Fusum Hoc Ms 
Deoque Addiclu 
Xicolao Castello 
^Edituo 

A.D. M.D.C.VI." 

A shield of arms underneath rather indistinct, but 
.hey appear to be quarterly, an eagle and a castle, 
another part of the same bell, " Serenissimo 
?erd: Elmriaa (qy.) Magno. Duce III. et Carlo 
Ant: Puteo: Pis: Archiep:" 

There are also escutcheons with a castle, a cross 
flory, the arms of the Medici, and a Madonna. 

A. A. 
Poets' Corner. 



32 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd s. III. JAN. 10, '63. 



THE WALKINSHAWS OF BARROWFIELD. 
(3 rd S. ii. 117,457.) 

I beg to thank G. J. for his obliging informa- 
tion regarding the deaths of Barbara and Eliza- 
beth Walkinshaw, and the name and position of 
their sister Katherine in the household of the 
Princess of Wales, mother of George III. I am 
satisfied that G. J. is correct in stating that this 
last-named lady was not one of the Maids of 
Honour, and that she was one of the Barrowfield 
Walkinshaws. This latter point is pretty con- 
clusively settled by Dr. Carlyle in his Autobio- 
graphy (p. 518), wherein he states that he saw 
Miss Walkinshaw in 1770, when in London that 
year ; and he adds, that " she was sister to the 
lady, said to be mistress to Prince Charles." It 
would appear, therefore, that this Katherine Wal- 
kinshaw held the situation at least twenty-five 
years : for, according to Dr. King, she was there 
in 1745 ; but how much earlier, or what ultimately 
became of her, I have not been able to trace. 

In my former communication I stated that one 
of the Misses Walkinshaw was named Eleonora, 
who married Alexander Grant of Arndilly ; and I 
quoted her name, instead of Katherine above re- 
ferred to. The authority on which I rested, will 
be found in the Appendix to The Cochran Cor- 
respondence (p. Ill), one of the Maitland Club 
books. But I have since had reason to doubt 
that any of the Misses Walkinshaw bore the name 
of Eleonora ; while, on the other hand, I am now 
certain that one of them was called Katherine. 
My reasons are these. Having lately had access 
to old deeds, dated in 1730, signed by the parents 
of the Misses Walkinshaw, as well as by these 
ladies themselves, I find that, for family purposes 
therein explained, it became necessary to mention 
the names of all the members of the family ; that 
this was accordingly done, and the following 
names appear, viz. 1. Barbara ; 2. Margaret ; 3. 
Katherine; 4. Anna; 5. Elizabeth; 6. Mary; 7. 
Jean ; 8. Helen ; 9. Lyonella ; 10. Clementina. 
The name of Eleonora is not even alluded to, 
which would not have been the case if she had 
been one of the sisters ; and, like the other ten, 
entitled to share the provisions in the family set- 
tlements. I, therefore, drop Eleonora out my 
list, and substitute Katherine, on the authority 
of these antique papers, subscribed, as they are, 
by the whole members of the Walkinshaw family. 

My object is to ascertain, with all possible re- 
spect, what became of the ten Misses Walkinshaw 
above enumerated ? They were the representa- 
tives of the old Lanarkshire family of Walkin- 
shaw of Barrowfield : the last male owner of that 
estate having been their father, who died about 
one hundred and thirty years ago ; after which, 
the family disappeared out of the district ; the 
estate having been sold, and the clue to the ladies 



lost. Some of them were married, and their pa- 
ternal name became absorbed in that of their 
husbands, while others died unmarried. It would 
be interesting to know, at the distance of one 
hundred and thirty years, who are now the re- 
presentatives of the married Walkinshaw ladies. 

With this view, I beg to summarise the in- 
formation which I have procured from different 
sources; and if wrong, I shall be obliged by 
having errors pointed out : 

1. Barbara, died unmarried, April 26, 1.780. 

2. Margaret married her cousin James, son of John 

Hynd of Glasgow ; whose wife was a daughter of 
James Walkinshaw of Walkinshaw. 

3. Katherine, housekeeper, from at least 1745 till at 

least 1770, to the Princess of Wales. 

4. Anna, fate unascertained. 

5. Elizabeth, died at Edinburgh, February 27, 1787. 

6. Mary, married James, son and heir of Colin Camp- 

bell of Blythswood ; and died, childless, on Sep- 
tember 24, 1771. 

7. Jean, fate unascertained. 

8. Helen, married William Murray of Jamaica, whose 

descendant, Sarah Murray, espoused the Hon. 
Charles Ashburnham, third son of the Earl of Ash- 
burnbam. Another descendant of Helen Walkin- 
shaw, named Mary, married Major-General Sir 
Henry Floyd, Bart. 

9. Lyonella, married her cousin William, son of James 

Walkinshaw of Walkinshaw. 

10. Clementina, whose tie to Prince Charles is well 
known. [Vide Brown's Highlands and Clans, vol/ 
iii. pp. 401-2.] 

Thus only two, viz. Anna and Jean, are unac- 
counted for. Perhaps some of your correspon- 
dents can supply the void. I may mention, that | 
throughout the old deeds alluded to, the ladies' 
names constantly appear in the above order ; from 
which I infer that they stand in the order of their 
ages, especially as the last, Clementina, is de- 
scribed as the youngest. 

John Walkinshaw, the father, died some time be- 
tween April 1730, and January 1731. His widow, 
Mrs. Katherine Paterson, who was a daughter of Sir 
Hugh Paterson of Bannockburn, survived Mr. 
Walkinshaw about fifty years ; and died at Edin- 
burgh, in November, 1780, at the great age of 
ninety-seven. J. B. 



PORTLANDERS. 
(3 rd S. ii. 411, 480.) 

In consequence of the question as to the cor- 
rectness of the statement respecting the Port- 
landers, I asked my brother, the Rector of Wey- 
mouth, about them, and he told me that they were 
a very remarkable race ; and peculiar for their 
size, the beauty of their dark eyes, and their loud 
voices ; but more especially for the great readi- 
ness with which they can turn their hands to any- 
thing they undertake ; and he referred me to 
the Rev. D. Hogarth, the Rector of Portland, for 



3' d S. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



33 



further information ; and, through his great cour- 
tesy, I am enabled to make the following state- 
ment : _ Twenty-four years ago, the population 
of Portland was 2,850 ; and at that time a man 
died there at the age of ninety, who was said to 
have been the one-thousandth person in the 
island when he was born. Though there was a 
continued intermarriage among the families of the 
island, and rarely beyond its limits, yet Mr. Ho- 
garth thinks that with such a population it was 
very different from a continued family or blood 
intermarriage : so that the same effects are not to 
be looked for in so marked a form ; but one di- 
sease of a terrible character is more prevalent 
there than in any place in Scotland or England 
with which Mr. Hogarth is acquainted. Cancer 
occurs in the breast, throat, tongue, lips, and 
stomach ; and Mr. Hogarth has been in the habit 
of attributing it to the intermarriages, but per- 
haps erroneously. 

There are four great families Stone, Atwooll, 
Pearce, and Comber ; but there are also many 
Lanos, Whites, and Sansoms old Portlanders, be- 
sides many interlopers. 

The stature is exaggerated. There are many 
men above six feet high, but by no means ap- 
proaching an average. When the Portland Volun- 
teers lately met those around Weymouth, the 
remark was that they were half a head taller, and 
that there was a step of some inches up where 
the line of Portlanders joined in. 

They are a fine strong healthy race, greatly 
superior to the ordinary agriculturists, both in 
person and intelligence ; but Mr. Hogarth thinks 
that the former must be partly attributed to fine 
air and comparatively good living ; their wages 
averaging a pound a-week, instead of ten shil- 
lings. 

Mr. Hogarth feels clear, from his own observ- 
ation during the twenty-four years he has been in 
the island, that they have diminished in stature as 
a race. He doubts their being of Saxon origin ; 
for they have the law of gavelkind, which tradi- 
tion says was given to them by the Conqueror 
when he landed, in gratitude for their having 
joined him in a body against their Saxon oppres- 
sors ; and Mr. Hogarth thinks them more likely 
to be of Danish extraction, like the noble men still 
to be found at Pakefield, near Lowestoff; Spital, 
near Berwick-on-Tweed ; Dundee, and Montrose. 

As a great change has taken place in the in- 
habitants of Portland in the last few years in con- 
sequence of the government works there, Mr. 
Hogarth's information seems peculiarly valuable. 
I may however add, that gavelkind was a Saxon 
tenure, which was continued in Kent through the 
importunity of the Kentish men ; and this rather 
leads to the inference, that Saxons inhabited the 
island at the Conquest. On the other hand, 
Lewis (Topog. Diet.} states, that "a party of 



Danish marauders landed here in 787, and, hav- 
ing killed the governor, obtained possession of the 
place ;" but no authority is referred to in support 
of this statement. C. S. GREAVES. 

The following abstract of a long note may fur- 
ther elucidate the question of the fine race of the 
inhabitants. It is from Smeaton's Account of the 
Building ofEddystone Lighthouse, second edit. fol. 
1793, p. 65: 

" Having observed that by far the greatest number of 
the quarrymen were of a very robust, hardy form . . - they 
are all born upon the island ; many of them have never 
been farther upon the main land than to Weymouth. . . 
The air, though very sharp, from our elevated situation, 
is certainly very healthy to working men . ... all our 
marriages here are productive of children . . . They in- 
termarry with one another, very rarely going to the 
main land to seek a wife ; and it has been tlie custom of 
the island from time immemorial, that they never marry 
till the woman is pregnant." 

This arrangement is thus described : Some of 
the men sent from London at that time (17 ) 
were obliged to marry some of the Portland ladies : 
" Since then, matters have gone on according to 
the ancient custom." W. P. 



OWEN FITZ-PEN, alias PHIPPEN, A MELCOMBE 

MAN. 

(3 rd S. ii. 409, 515.) 

During a tour in Cornwall a few years since, I 
was examining the church atTruro, and the epitaph 
in question " Melcombe in Dorset was his place 
of birth," &c. was pointed out to me by the sexton 
on a marble tablet in the chancel. I read the 
lines with much interest, being myself a native of 
that county, and well acquainted with nearly every 
parish in Dorsetshire. I remember there was no 
doubt in my mind as to the whereabouts of this 
Melcombe Man. It was certainly not at Mel- 
combe-Regis, which two hundred years ago was 
only a hamlet, with a few scattered fishermen's 
huts in the village of Radipole. Dr. Willis, the 
royal physician, recommended George III., on re- 
covering from his mental affliction, to sojourn in 
this quiet retreat, and after that it soon became 
a celebrated watering-place. The whole of that 
made ground, now called the Park, was in the 
sixteenth century a swamp covered with rushes, 
extending up to the village Reedy-Pool. There 
was a ferry across the water to the ancient port 
and harbour of Weymouth, always a place of con- 
siderable trade. Owen Fitzpen, alias Phippen, 
was a cadet of the Norman Fitzpaines, a family 
which (see Hutchins's Dorset) had manors and 
lands in no less than twenty parishes. The his- 
torian gives their pedigree under the head of 
" Ockford Fitzpaine," a parish on the banks of the 
Stour, no great distance from Melcombe, the 



34 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3" S. III. JAN. 10, '63. 



birthplace of Fitzpen the subject of this inquiry 
The attempt to trace his lineal descent, and un- 
ravel the mystery of his exploits, would occupy 
too much space in your columns ; and, at best, 
would be but a prosy narrative to most of your 
readers. I shall, therefore, only briefly explain 
the original derivation of the name. 

Pagan-Paynim-Payne-Penn, the noted Quaker 
of Pennsylvania; Fitz is Norman-French, from 
the Latin filius, a son. The corruptions and con- 
tractions in all tongues are dreadfully puzzling 
to the uninitiated. Frequently even the anti- 
quary can only make a doubtful guess at the 
original word. Take, for instance, Fip-penny Ock- 
ford, Sixpenny Hanley, and Shilling (i. e. twelve- 
penny) Ockford. So the illiterate vulgar pro- 
nounce the names of these places. Who would 
ever guess that Fitzpen and Saxpen, and Schil- 
ling were lords of the manor in these three 
parishes^? And the mediaeval literati, who could 
sign their names, and not simply put a X , were 
no great orthographers. Happily a new Roll of 
Domesday Book lately published will be a better 
guide for the unknown tongue of Norman spel- 
ling. In the numberless passages of his History, 
where Hutchins mentions Fitzpaine, the name is 
never spelt twice the same. It is much like the 
riddle of a wig, sometimes with a head, sometimes 
without a head ; sometimes with a tail, sometimes 
without a tail ; and sometimes without either. 
So diversely were the letters placed to compose 
this word. The "haughty English" of medievalism 
was somewhat improved after the Reformation. 
Henry VIII. wrote Payne. Penn came in at the 
Restoration with Charles II. The Augustan Age in 
England varied the letters again. A courtly wit, 
writing to a fair lady of this name, who had sent 
to inquire for his health, answered 
" Tia true I am ill, but I must not complain, 

For he never knew pleasure that never knew Pain" 
This was in the reign of Queen Anne. The first 
two Georges were poor scribes, and their German 
text was illegible. With third George came the 
French Revolution, and The Age of Reason of 
that notorious radical, Tom Paine. So he spelt his 
name, and here I lay down my pen. 

QUEEN'S GARDENS. 



SIE THOMAS PRENDERGAST (1 st S. xi. 12, 89, 
172.) My attention having been called to one 
of the earlier volumes of " N. & Q.," where the 
account of Sir Thomas Prendergast's dream given 
in Boswell's Johnson, is reproduced (vol. xi. p. 89), 
I send you the words entered in Prendergast's 
pocket-book, as copied by me many years ago 
from a MS. collection of family notes, which had 
belonged to his grandson. 

I fancy^ General Oglethorpe or Colonel Cecil 
indulged in the frequent license of storyteller?, 



filling tip from their own imaginations such de- 
tails in the story as they could not call to mind. 

The tradition in Prendergast's family is, that 
the pocket-book was taken possession of, not by 
Colonel Cecil, whom I have been unable to iden- 
tify, but by Lord Cadogan, who was a general in 
the army where Prendergast was serving as briga- 
dier. This is very probable ; and in this case the 
book may still exist in the possession of his repre- 
sentative, the Duke of Richmond. 

General Oglethorpe's version connects the 
dream with the death of Sir John Friend ; but I 
know of no evidence that Prendergast ever saw 
him ; and his conscience must have felt at ease as 
regarded him. Friend was tried and condemned 
at the same time as those implicated in the Assas- 
sination Plot, but it was for a different offence ; 
namely, for accepting a commission to raise a 
regiment for King James II., and it is believed 
that he in no way sanctioned the assassination. 
Prendergast was not a witness against him, nor 
concerned in his trial. The story, therefore, re- 
lated by MR. D'Ai/roN ("N. & Q." xi. 172) can 
have no connection with him, but appears to 
refer to Captain Blair, to whom Friend had been 
a benefactor, and who then betrayed him. 

The manly and honourable conduct of Sir 
Thomas Prendergast throughout these affairs will 
be well understood by referring to Macaulay's 
description of it, vol. iv. chap. xxi. pp. 662, 664 ; 
a chapter written in a tone* (see p. 660), which 
satisfies me that he would not have praised an 
Irishman if he could have helped it. 

The extract I copied is as follows : 

" Being in bed with my wife last night in this my 
house in the city of London, I dreamt that James Gran- 
well, a native of Clonmell in Ireland, and who died in my 
service three years ago, appeared in my livery, and told 
me to prepare for death, for that I should die this day 
year. Though having no superstition on the subject, "l 
note this as a curious memorandum, if such an event 
should happen me. 

"Tflos. PRENDERGAST. 

" ?t>cr 11, 1708." 

S. P. V. 

JENNER PEDIGREE (3 rd S. iii. 10.) In answer 
to your correspondent R. J. F., there is a pedi- 
gree of the Jenner family to face p. 220 in 
Fosbrooke's Biographical Anecdotes of Dr. Jen- 
ner, commencing with the Doctor's great-great- 
grandfather Stephen Jenner, of Standish Court, 
Gloucestershire, who died 1667, aet. fifty-six. There 
is also an account of the family in Fosbrooke's 
History of Gloucestershire, ii. 44, 45, 46. 

SAMUEL LYSONS. 

CAPT. RICHARD PEIRCE (3 rd S. iii. 9.) I 
have a gold mourning ring enamelled, black on 
one side, white on the other. It has this inscrip- 
tion : " Capt: R. Peirce, ae. 46, shipwreck'd with 
his dau"El: se. 16, & Ma: 89. 14, 6 Jan: 1786." 

I send this because it corrects the orthography 



3'* S. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



35 



of the unfortunate officer's name, and gives the 
names and ages of his two children, which are in- 
correctly stated, p. 9 ante. I believe in conse- 
quence of this catastrophe, an admiralty order 
was issued forbidding captains of ships to have 
their families on board. Q, D. 

GHERARD MERMAN'S "BOATMAN'S DIALOGUES'' 
(3 rd S. ii. 229, 457.) The author's name and the 
title of his book are given inaccurately ; but suffi- 
ciently to show who and what are intended. " The 
Boatswain's Yarn" is, I think, a fair equivalent 
of Bootsmans-Praetje, which was written by Wil- 
lem Meerman, son of Geeraert Meerman, the bur- 
gomaster and high bailiff (hooftschoufy of Delft. 
All which I can find about William is, that he 
was a sailor : that he produced the work in ques- 
tion in 1612, and that he went out in search of 
the north-west passage, and did not return. I 
have not seen the first edition. The second has a 
preface and notes, by George van Zonhoven. Its 
title is Comcedia vetus of Bootsmans Praetje, Am- 
sterdam, 1732. It also contains the second part, 
which appeared soon after the first : Malle- 
Waegen zynde een vervolg en Verantwoording van 
de Comcedia vetus of Bootsmans-Praetje. 

Some of the Bootsman's Praetje may be under- 
stood with the help of the notes : the Malle- 
Waegen is nearly unintelligible. The editor 
says that Meerman intentionally obscured his 
meaning with sea-phraseology, and allusions to 
matters which, though generally known in his 
time, were forgotten in 1732. What was difficult 
to a^ Dutchman then, may be held impossible to 
an Englishman now. Zonhoven says, in the pre- 
face : 

" De Schryver leefde in die droevige tyden, daer in de 
verschillen en twisten tussen de Remonstranten en con- 
truremonstranten over de vyf bekende Artikelen da- 
getyks toenamen, en door heet gebakerde Geestelyken 
dermaten wierden opgewakkert, dat ze daernae tot hart- 
zeer der vredelievenden in openbaere scheuringen en 
vervoigingen zyn uitgeborsten : Hy zag dit spel am, en 
vondt goedt het quaet der kerkelyke twisten, en hare 
heillooze gevolgen in geachrift openlyk ten toon te stellen 
zonder yemant te verschoonen; zeggende den Remou- 
stranten, aen welker zyde by meest scheen te hellen, so 
wel als den contraremonstranten het haere." 

Meerman is especially intolerant towards the 
Papists, and concludes his "yarn" with : 

" En bid, Veriest aus Heer van Qod-geleerden haet, 
D ouwe bryg van den Paus tot Ziel en Land-verraet." 
To which the editor adds 
" Libera nos Dornine ab odio theologico. Amen." 

A prayer which was much needed then, and is not 
wholly inappropriate now. 

In tbQBiographie Generate (torn, xxxiv. p. 71 1), 
the editor is called " Van den Hoven ;" and he is 
said to have reprinted the Comcedia Vetus at Am- 
sterdam, 1718, 1732, 12mo. My copy is 8vo, 1732 



" de tweede druk ;" and as it does not mention 
any other edition, I doubt the existence of that of 
1718. 

No one who had seen both books could have 
supposed that one was the translation of the other. 
Les Entretiens des Voyageurs sur la Mer, a la 
Haye, 1740, 4 torn., 12mo, is readable now; and 
must have been pleasant when books of easy theo- 
logy were scarce, and controversy had not been 
worked up for railway editions. H. B. C. 

U. U. Club. 

KEV. BENJAMIN WAY (3 rd S. ii. 343.) As this 
gentleman was pastor of an Independent church 
in this city, from 1675-6 until his death in No- 
vember, 1680, and I take a deep interest in all 
that relates to Bristol history, I am by no means 
satisfied with the remarks regarding him which 
have appeared in your columns ; and would sug- 
gest to your correspondent that it is quite pos- 
sible the All Hallows Barking does not refer at 
all to the Essex parish, but to one of the same 
name, " situated on the north and east sides of 
Tower Street and Seething Lane, in the ward of 
Tower Street," London. I would, therefore, re- 
quest your correspondent to search among the 
records of the latter parish, and at once decide 
the question ; as I believe his name will be found 
to be associated with it, and that it was from 
thence he was ejected. 

It is also said that John Knowles was ejected 
from Bristol Cathedral in 1660, meaning perhaps 
1662. Can any of your readers give me any ac- 
count of this individual, as I believe there is no 
record of him in the archives of our local eccle- 
siastical corporation ? GEORGE PRICE. 

Bristol City Library. 

QUOTATION (3 rd S. ii. 491.) 

" Earth could not hold us both, nor can one heaven 
Contain my deadliest enemy and me." 

From Robert Southey's magnificent tragic poem, 
Roderick, the Last of the Goths, book xxi. See 
1 vol. edition of the Poetical Works, p. 704. 

EDWARD PEACOCK. 

ROMAN AND SAXON ANTIQUITIES (3 rd S. ii. 
491.) To prevent the efflorescence and exfolia- 
tion complained of, dry the object carefully, and 
then cover it with hot carpenter's glue laid on 
with a brush ; not too thickly, but in sufficient 
quantity to leave a slight varnish after the first 
coat has been absorbed. This will consolidate 
the oxide, and prevent future flaking off. This 
plan, which is adopted by J. Y. Akerman, Esq., 
is better than the use of boiled linseed oil, em- 
ployed by some collectors. 

Should any portion of an iron acus adhere to a 
bronze fibula, by all means preserve it, and treat 
the fragment as above. 

W. J. BERNHARD SMITH. 
Temple. 



36 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3*d S. III. JAX. 10, '63. 



HOLYROOD HOUSE (3 rJ S. ii.490.) In "N.& Q." 
a reference is made to verses called "Holyrood 
House." Does the writer mean " Thoughts oc- 
casioned by the Funeral of the Earl and Countess 
of Sutherland at the Abbey of Holyrood House?" 
If so, I refer her to the Scots Magazine, and 
to Stenhouse, for the same. The lines I refer to 
were supposed to have been written by Sir Gil- 
bert Elliot of Minto (third baronet) : a man of 
true literary faculty, and a capital poet. He also 
wrote verses on the brave and pious Capt. Gar- 
diner, who fell at Preston Pans, and a pastoral 
called "My sheep I've forsaken." Sir Gilbert, 
who died in 1777, was the father of the first Earl 
of Minto. Sir Gilbert Elliot, of Stobs, father of 
the gallant Lord Heathfield of Gibraltar fame, 
died in 1764. And if the latter Sir Gilbert was also 
a poet, I shall be glad to be informed by your 
correspondent. W. RIDDELL CABKE. 

"!L FAUX VIVRE" (3 rd S. ii. 504.) It strikes 
me that the " II faut vivre " anecdote is much 
older than the time of Voltaire's going to live at 
Ferney. When Orator Henley was being ex- 
amined before Lord Chesterfield, he pleaded the 
necessity of earning a livelihood; and was an- 
swered by Lord C. that he did not see the neces- 
sity. But the orator retorted : " That is a clever 
thing, my lord, but it has been said before." So 
that the anecdote must date from a yet earlier 
period than when Orator Henley was preaching in 
Clare Market. W. H. 

BAPTISM OF CHURCH BELLS: SHOCHTMADONY 
(3-^S. ii. 496.) The bell called " Shochtmadony " 
having been presented to the church of St. Mary, 
there can be no reason for questioning the ac- 
curacy of your correspondent's conclusion, that 
-madony stands for Madonna. To schog, or shog, 
is in Old English, "to shake from side to side;" 
and in Scotch, "to move backwards and for- 
wards " Qu. To swing * The bell had probably 
impressed upon it an image of Our Lady, or, at 
any rate, her name. This would of course be 
swung backwards and forwards, in the swinging 
of the bell ; and hence, I would submit, the name 
of " Schochtmadony," i. e. " The swung or swing- 
ing Madonna." VEDETTE. 

DR. JOHN ASKEW (3 rd S. ii. 348, 514.) I feel 
specially obliged to your correspondent INA for 
the full and authentic particulars contained in his 
communication, and I beg to say that I shall take 
the liberty of sending a few notes to his signature, 
to be left at Wells Post Office, as a mode of ex- 
plaining the great wish I entertain of discover- 
ing the doctor's parentage : though such notes 
would be uninteresting to the general readers of 

I would suggest the possibility of an error in 
calling John Askew D.D., upon the monument of 



a wife who died 1789, when, according to the 
1823 edition of Graduati Cantabrigienses, he did 
not proceed to his D.D. degree till 1794. 

Mr. Phelps may have printed " D.D." for B.D., 
unless the monument were erected the year be- 
fore the doctor's second marriage, which took 
place in 1795. See Gent's Magazine, 1795 : 

" Dr. John Askew, Rector of North Cadbury, Somer- 
set, to Miss Mary Sunderland, 2nd daughter of the late 
Thomas Sunderland, Esq., of Bigland Hall, Lancaster." 

She died 1805, and was buried at North Cad- 
bury. 

INA seems to possess family papers which have 
fully confirmed all the information I have been 
collecting, with no other view than to settle a 
question of genealogy. I shall be glad to com- 
municate to him the result of my future inquiries, 
should success attend the search I am making 
with some expectation and hope. E. W. 

ITINERARY OF EDWARD I. AND II., ETC. (3 rd S. 
i. 466.) Referring to your number for June 
14th, 1862, 1 see MR. KELLY of Leicester makes 
inquiry for the itineraries of Edward I. and II., 
stated by the late Mr. Joseph Hunter to have been 
made for the Record Commission. An itinerary 
of Edward II. compiled most carefully by the 
Rev. C. H. Hartshorne, M.A., has been printed 
by the British Archasological Association in vol. i. 
of their Collectanea Archceologica published by 
Longman & Co., and the itinerary of Edward I. 
by the same authority will appear in the forth- 
coming vol. ii. of the same work. 

T. J. PETTIGREW. 

Onslow Crescent, Brompton. 

MOCK SUN (3 rd S. ii. 505.) The appear- 
ance of a parhelion, or mock sun, mentioned by 
your correspondent, is not of unusual occurrence. 
In former ages it was considered as a prodigy, 
and many of your readers will recollect the ac- 
count of the appearance of one before the battle 
of Mortimer's Cross in 1461. It is thus alluded 
to by Shakspeare : 

"Three glorious suns, each one a perfect sun: 
Not separated by the racking clouds, 
But sever'd in a pale, clear, shining sky. 
See ! see ! they join, embrace, and seem to kiss, 
As if they vow'd some league inviolable : 
Now are they but one lamp, one light, one sun." 

Henry VI. Part III., Act II. Sc. 1. 

Edward, Earl of March, who there commanded 
the Yorkists, subsequently King Edward IV., in 
consequence of this, assumed as his cognisance or 
badge " the sun in his splendour " 

" Whate'er it bodes, henceforward will I bear, 
Upon my target, three fair shining suns." 

Henry VI. 

Mortimer's Cross is in the parish of Kingsland 
and county of Hereford, at no great distance from 
the picturesque ruin of Wigmore Castle, once the 



3'* S. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



37 



abode of the Mortimers, Earls of March. Wig- 
more became subsequently the property of the 
Harleys, Earls of Oxford and Mortimer, and gave 
to them the inferior title of baron. 

OXONIENSIS. 

NAME OF THE KOYAL FAMILY OF ENGLAND 
(3 rd S. i. 258.) I am really much obliged to MB. 
CLINTON for quoting a case which furnishes a very 
opportune illustration of my " notions." He says : 
" The family [of the Emperor of Austria] can 
only be the House of Austria, or of Lorraine 
Austria." MR. CLINTON has apparently forgotten 
that this family derives its name of Austria from 
females ! 

Was your correspondent ever distressed in his 
childhood by the puzzling fact, that Anne of 
Austria was the daughter of the King of Spain ? 
When I was "juvenile and curly," this most ab- 
surd nomenclature once caused me some hours' 
fruitless hunting through pedigrees ; and to this 
day, it appears to me a title calculated to mislead 
rather than conduct. 

If we pursue MR. CLINTON'S theory, and apply 
it to other reigning houses, it will be found that 
the Emperor of Austria is not a Romanoff, for he 
descends from Peter the Great through that 
monarch's eldest daughter, Anna, Duchess of 
Holstein Gottorp. And the King of Portugal is 
not a member of the House of Bragan<ja, but has 
founded a new House of Saxe-Coburg a re- 
mark which conveys the idea that the elder House 
has become extinct. 

Plantagenet, Mortimer, and Tudor, are names 
which do not belong to the reigning House at all. 
The first is not a surname ; the second was an 
assumed name; the last is that of an English 
princess who never came to the throne herself, 
and who married a foreign sovereign entirely a 
different question, it appears to me, from the title 
of the children of an English sovereign who has 
married a foreign prince. HERMENTRUDE. 

ELDEST SONS OF BARONETS AND THEIR KNIGHT- 
HOOD (3 rd S. ii. 397.) There are two articles in 
the Gentleman's Magazine for April and June, 
1847; which may explain why knighthood was 
refused in 1836 to the applicant named. 

ALARIC. 

TOADS IN ROCKS (3 rd S. i. 389, 478 ; ii. 55, 97.) 
Besides these words, it is customary to say there 
was a frog in the hole. A hole being found large 
enough to contain a frog or toad in the middle 'of 
a block of stone has always appeared to me to 
be the first curious half of the doubtful story ; 
the ^ second half, which I never believed, was 
finding the frog or toad in it. Could the state- 
ment have arisen thus ? The hollow of the foot 
of a horse is called the " frog." The hollow or 
sinking, on one face of a brick, is, in some places 
m England, also called a " frog." When a hole 



or hollow was found in a stone, might not the 
country workman have said, " There's a frog in 
the stone " ? Most probably the next person would 
declare, that " the stone had been cut and a frog 
found in the hole," and so on. Do the geologists 
consider that it is probable that a hollow of the 
kind would be found in any apparently solid 
block of nature's make ? WYATT PAPWORTH. 

MONUMENT IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY (3 rd S. ii. 
126, 173.) The one in question, that of Lady 
Eliz. Russel pointing to her finger, is thus re- 
ferred to in a description of the Abbey : 

" Your guides say, that she died with a prick of her 
finger; but this story has no other foundation than a 
misapprehension of the statuary's design; for having 
represented her asleep, and pointing with her finger to a 
death's head under her right foot, it has been supposed, 
by the position of her finger pointing downwards, that 
it was bleeding, and that this had closed her eyes in 
death ; though the artist's design seems rather to allude 
to the composed situation of her mind at the approach 
of death, which she considered only as a profound sleep, 
from which she was again to wake to a joyful resurrection, 
of which the motto under her feet is an evident illustra- 
tion, Dormit, non mortua est : " She is not dead, but 
sleepeth." The Latin inscription on the scroll beneath, 
only tells that this monument was erected to her memory 
by her afflicted sister Anne." London and its Environs 
described, 8vo, 1761, vol. i. p. 39. 

I find also that Ackermann's History of the 
Abbey, published in 1812, refers to the story as 
" an idle fancy." The left hand is stated by 
JAYDEE to be now broken away. Should not 
some compiler give us a work entitled " The Tales 
of my Guide"? W. P. 

WESTMINSTER HALL (2 nd S. ix. 463, 513; x. 
58.)- There ,has been great uncertainty as to the 
correct dimensions of this grand work of archi- 
tecture. The dimensions, 239 feet long, 68 feet 
wide, and 90 feet high, to the ridge, as given, 
from Sir Charles Barry's measurements, in the 
second of the above references, are no doubt cor- 
rect. Many years since, I read of a presumed 
order from William Rufus, directing the size that 
the hall was to be built. It was so peculiarly 
worded that I have always regretted not having 
made a note of it. The following extract coin- 
cides with what I remember of it : 

" The breadth of Westminster Hall is such as seems 
likely to have been determined by directions transmitted 
from a distance, and in rude times. This breadth is that 
which is still familiarly called in many parts of England 
acre breadth, that is, four perches or poles, of five yards 
and a half each, or twenty-two yards ; acre length being 
forty such perches, or the measure we now call a, furlong, 
a word abbreviated for forty long." Communication to 
Mr. Smith, p. 259 of his Antiq. of Westminster, 4to, 1807. 

Calculating the first of these lengths, we shall 
find that the width of the hall is 4 poles or 66 feet 
(68 actually) wide, and 14 poles, or 238 feet 
4 ins. (239 as above; yet Pugin gives the width 



38 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[8'* S. III. JAif. 10, '63. 



as 238 feet, 8 ins.) These results are not very ac- 
curate, but we must remember that the walls 
have been repaired at various times. It is in- 
teresting to notice that three and-a-half times the 
width (viz. 68 X 3) gives 238, equal to the length. 

Are the dimensions of any other building notice- 
able for the probable use of the perch, as thus 
detailed ? The length given by Sir C. Barry are 
of course exclusive of his addition at the southern 
end of the building. WYATT PAPWORTH. 

MODERN WRITER ALLUDED TO BY BOILEAU 
(3 rd S. ii. 490.) Doubtless this must be Dante, 
Inferno, canto xvii. 49 51, where he says : 

" Non altrimenti fan di state i cani, 

Or col ceffo, or col pie, quando son niorsi 
da pulci, o da mosche, o da tafani." 

In English 

" Not otherwise do dogs in summer-time, 

With muzzle now, and now with claw, when fleas, 

Or flies, or gad-flies bite them." 

I confess that, to my uncritical ear, this humble 
simile does not damage the grand simplicity of 
Dante's poem ; and I suspect it would not be 
impossible to find a parallel for it in Homer. I 
have no copy of Boileau's works at hand ; but the 
passage may probably be in his Art Poetique. 

C. W. BlNGHAM. 

VITRUVIUS (2 nd S. vi. 287.) If your corre- 
spondent AN ARCHITECT be still a reader of your 
periodical, he will find in the first part of the first 
volume of the Transactions of the Royal Institute 
of British Architects, published in 1836, at p. 120, 
a notice that the MS. of Vitruvius, now in the 
Library of St. John's College, Oxford, formerly 
belonged to St. Augustine's Abbey at Canterbury, 
and was written in 1316. WYATT PAPWORTH. 

CASHMERE, ETC. (3 rd S. ii. 505.) S. will find 
a full account of the native chronicles of Cashmere 
in a paper by Prof. H. H. Wilson, in the fifteenth 
volume of Asiatic Researches. 

Prinsep's translation of the Lat inscriptions is 
in No. 67 (p. 566) of Journal of Asiatic Society 
(1837). 

Prof. Wilson's rendering of the same occurs in 
the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. xii. 
P- 153. G. MOORE. 

Hastings. 

MINUTIUS FELIX (3 rd S. ii. 445.) Your cor- 
respondent has directed my attention to Minutius 
Felix, by his conjectural amendment of the text. 
The only edition I possess is printed at Leyden, 
1672, and i*, according to Watt, the best. The 
passage in the text quoted stands uberibus, and I 
am inclined to think it more likely to be the true 
reading than turribus. In a note on another pas- 
sage of the Octavius a commentator thus expresses 
himself: " Arnat Minutius plures voces ejusdem 
significations copulare." The easy transposition 



of the cognate letters b and v, and the similarity of 
u and v would account for veribus, which I agree 
with your correspondent must be corrupt. 

THOMAS E. WINNINGTON. 

PEERAGE FORFEITED (3 rd S. iii. 8.) George 
Nevill, created Duke of Bedford Jan. 5, 1469, 
being ruined by the death and attainder of his 
father, John Nevill, Marquess of Montagu, in 1471, 
and having therefore no means to support his dig- 
nity, was degraded by parliament in 1477. 

Robert Stafford, the heir of the illustrious 
House of Stafford, Dukes of Buckingham, was 
compelled to surrender the Barony of Stafford, 
" having no part of the inheritance of the said 
Lord Stafford (Henry, only son of the last Duke,) 
nor any other lands or means whatsoever. 1 ' See 
Burke's Extinct Peerage. S. P. V. 

To "SPEAK BY THE CARD" (3 rd S. ii. 503.) 
In an interesting little book in my possession, 
published in 1797, The History and Antiquities of 
the Incorporated Town and Parishes of Gravesend 
and Milton, in the County of Kent, there is a list of 
the monumental inscriptions in Saint George's 
Church (or Chapel) in Gravesend, as they existed 
in 1727, extracted from Thorpe's Antiquities, to 
which book I have not the means of referring. 

The following may be worth notice in reference 
to the meaning of the " shipman's card," as it 
must have been written very near the date of the 
first appearance of Hamlet : 

" On the south wall, on a monument of black and white 
marble, are the effigies of a man, his wife, five sons, and 
five daughters, and these arms, viz., argent, a bear ram- 
pant, sable, armed and langued, and a canton gules. 
Crest, on a garb prostate, or, a cornish chough, proper. 
The inscription is on two compartments. On the first is 
only legible James Bere, 1609. On the second these 
verses : 

" After much wery sayling, worthie Bere, 

Arry ved this quiet port, and harbers here. 

As skilfully in honestie he brought, 

His humaine vessel home, as he was thought 

Equal with any that by card or starr, 

Took out and brought again his barke from far. 

So let him rest in quiet till he hear 

The trumpet sound, when all must rise with Bere. 

And for his fame and honest memorie, 

This is his frail and breef eternity." 

Does not "card" here evidently refer to the 
compass? The " shipman's card," in the Witch's 
speech in Macbeth, may be either a chart with the 
prevalent winds noted on it ; or the card of the 
mariner's needle, which having all the points of 
the compass might be said to have every possible 
wind in it. 

I incline to the opinion that Hamlet does not 
refer to the "shipman's card" at all, but to one of 
those " cards or calendars of gentry," several of 
which were published in his time. 

J. HENRY SHORTHOOSE. 

Edgbaston. 



3'<i S. III. JAX. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



39 



ORDER or ST. JOHN or JERUSALEM (3 rd S. iii. 8.) 
This Order is now a part of the Order of Knights 
Templars, whose head quarters are at Freemasons' 
Hall, London. The Grand Master for England 
is William Stuart, Esq., and his deputy, Colonel 
G. A. Vernon. H. FISHWICK. 

HAZEL EYES (2 nd S. xii. 270, 337; 3 ra S.iii. 18.) 
MR. BUCKTON has dealt so pleasantly and conclu- 
sively with this subject (2 nd S. xii. 337), that I 
am somewhat diffident in giving an opinion that 
hazel may be derived from azul, Spanish and Por- 
tuguese, and mean blue after all. U. O. N. 

EXTRAORDINARY CHRISTMAS CAROL (3 rd S.^iii. 
6.) It is curious, but true, that I was thinking 
of sending a scrap of a carol similar to the one 
contributed by A. A. I hesitated, on account of 
remembering only two verses, which I thought 
hardly worth sending. But as the subject has 
been so agreeably opened, I think my two short 
verses may be acceptable, and their insertion will 
at least go to show that the carol, with variations, 
is known in other counties besides Kent. It was 
many years ago that I heard an old man in Staf- 
fordshire sing a Christmas Carol, of which I regret 
to be unable to repeat more than the first two 
verses, which ran thus : 

" As I sot on a Sunday bonk (sunny lank~) 
A Sunday bonk, a Sunday bonk, 
As I sot on a Sunday bonk, 
Three ships cam sailing by. 
" And who should be in these three ships, 
In these three ships, in these three ships, 
And who should be in these three ships, 
But Joseph and his Leady " (Lady}. 
How these two holy persons could sail in three 
ships, the carol singer, of course, never thought of 
being called upon to explain. F. C. H. 

"A BRIEFE DESCRIPTION OF THE WHOLE WORLD" 
(3 rd S. ii. 231.) In the question put by LLAL- 
LAWG, and in the Editorial answer, mention is 
made of various editions ; amongst others, the 
5th edition of 1664, and the 9th edition of 1617. 
I have before me " The sixt edition," printed for 
John Marriott, 1624 ; and I cannot help remark- 
ing how queerly these editions run : the 9th was 
put forth in 1617; the 6th in 1624; and the 5th 
in 1664; apparently a crab-like method. The 
peculiarity, however, may be explained (I wish it 
would be) by some correspondent conversant with 
the practice of the old printers and publishers. I 
j shall be _ glad to learn what rule obtained as to 
consecutive editions. SIGMA-TAU. 

Cape Town, S. Africa. 

" ST. GEORGE FOR ENGLAND " (3 rd S. ii. 229.) 

I remember reading, I fancy either in Fuller or 
Peter Heylin, an apology for the English cry of 
" St. George," on the ground that it was not an 
invocation of a saint; but an appeal to the 

II reo>p7&y," or, Great Husbandman. Can anyone 
tell me where it was ? 



Was there not a question in " N. & Q." some 
time back, about Paul Scarron? I cannot find 
it.* J. HENRY SHORTHOUSE. 

PDRKISS FAMILY (3 rd S.iii. 8.) There are per- 
sons of this name claiming such a descent ; but 
during the lapse of so many centuries, and the 
humble condition of the family or families in ques- 
tion, together with the absence of documentary 
proof, such claims may afford subjects for specu- 
lation, but are generally, to use Macbeth's ex- 
pression, "full of sound and fury, signifying 
nothing." The name itself is curious ; and in such 
a time immemorial pork-loving locality, may have 
been common to numerous families in^the same 
sphere of life. A portion of the original cart, in 
which were conveyed to Winchester the remains 
of Rufus, is said, only a few years since during 
a severe winter to have been used as fuel. 
Such heir-looms at best, however, are very ques- 
tionable as we all know ; and if w.e were to be- 
lieve that so much attaches to a name, we might 
find many Richmond's in the field, besides nume- 
rous Lords Lovat, Earls Crawford, &c. quite 
sufficient to swamp the humbler peerage of mo- 
dern days ! SPAL. 

If M. !N". consults Sir B. Burke's third series 
of Vicissitudes, p. 8, he will see the following : 

" In a speech to a Hampshire audience, at the opening" 
of a local railway, his lordship (Viscount Palmerston) 
observed, that there was a small estate in the New- 
Forest, which had belonged to the lime-burner, Purki.?,. 
who picked up the body of Rufus, and carried the royal 
corpse in his humble cart to Winchester, and which had 
come down through an uninterrupted male line of an- 
cestry, to a worthy yeoman of the same name, now resi- 
dent on the exact same farm, near Stoney Cross, on the 
Ringwood Road, eight miles from Romsey." 

SID. YOUNG. 



NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC. 

A Dictionary of Dates, relating to all Ages and Nations? 
for Universal Reference; comprehending Remarkable Oc- 
currences, Ancient and Modern, fyc. By Joseph Haydn. 
Eleventh Edition, revised and greatly enlarged by Benjamin 
Vincent. (Moxon & Co.) 

He must be a most exacting critic who, with respect 
te a book like this now before us, containing as it does 
some thousands of names and dates, and professing to 
furnish information upon all questions which can arise 
touching the civil, political, military, or religious history, 
the laws, government, arts and sciences of the world 
generally but of the British Empire more particularly 
should expect that it would 

" Spring like Minerva from the head of Jove, 

All perfect and complete." 

But ever}' reader of the Dictionary of Dates has a right 
to expect that, as the patronage of the public calls for 
new editions, such new editions should be not only pro- 
fessedly but really enlarged and improved. This right on 
the part of the public has, we are bound to say, been 

L* See 2 nd S. iii. 170, 218; v. 66.] 



40 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[8* S. III. JAN. 10, -'63. 



fully recognised and acted upon by Mr. Vincent. Hav- 
ing noted on the fly-leaf of our own copy of the ninth 
edition articles which we had sought for in vain, but 
which we considered ought to have been included in a 
Dictionary of Dates, we have used those articles as tests 
of Mr. Vincent's improvements and enlargements, and 
we are bound to say that, with two or three trifling ex- 
ceptions, those omissions are supplied in this new and 
greatly improved edition. Not only is the Dictionary 
itself enlarged, but, which is equally important and valu- 
able, the Index is much more full ; and we think Mr. Vin- 
cent has in the eleventh edition gone far to realise the 
object he has proposed to himself, namely, to " make his 
book not a mere Dictionary of Dates, but a Dated Ency- 
clopaedia a digested summary of the History of the World 
brought down to the very eve of its publication." 

Lamps of the Church ; or Rays of Faith, Hope, and 
Charity, from the Lives and Deaths of some Eminent 
Christians of the Nineteenth Century. By the Rev. Henry 
Clissold, M.A. CRivingtons.) 

There ia one admirable characteristic of this volume by 
the author of Last Hours of Eminent Christian Men, which 
must recommend it to all readers, namely, the Catholic 
spirit which breathes through the biographical sketches, 
and has also governed the selection of those whose Chris- 
tian lives and deaths are here commemorated ; for the 
editor has included in his book as " in the vast dome- 
circle of our glorious National Church the lamps of all 
in her communion, who have shone as lights before men, 
and adorned the doctrine of God our Saviour." 

Fish Culture : a Practical Guide to the Modern System 
of Breeding and Rearing Fish. By Francis Francis. With 
numerous Illustrations. (Routledge.) 

Mr. Francis's design in the present volume is to show 
his readers not only how they may hatch the eggs of 
fish, but how they can best bestow their energies, and 
direct their studies and experiments, as a means towards 
increasing the supply of wholesome fish-food : to review 
the various freshwater fish found in Great Britain, and 
point out how those which are most valuable may best 
be distributed, cultivated, and increased ; to consider 
what fish it may be most advisable to acclimatise ; and, 
in short, to indicate how our vast deserts of lake and 
stream, which are now comparatively valueless, may, by 
judicious fish- culture, be converted into mines of wealth. 
The subject is a most important one in many points of 
view. Mr. Francis is an enthusiastic writer, who car- 
ries his readers with him, because it is clear that he 
combines with his enthusiasm a thorough knowledge of 
the subject on which he is treating. 

The Songs' of Scotland prior to Burns. With the Tunes. 
Edited by Robert Chambers. (W. & R. Chambers.) 

Beautifully printed both as regards the words and the 
music ; and, with pleasant literary introductions to each 
song, this little volume embodies the whole of the pre- 
Burnsian Songs of Scotland that are presentable and 
possess merit. It is meant as historical in its general 
scope and arrangement, and we agree with the editor 
in thinking it quite sufficient to satisfy all ordinary in- 
quirers into the subject as a Department of National 
Literature. It will be a welcome little volume, not only 
to all Scotchmen, but to all lovers of National Music 
for national the music is, be it the music of England or 
of Scotland. 

THE MAGAZINES. The old favourites of the Magazine- 
loving public commence the year well, showing as much 
anxiety to retain their hold on the good will of their 
readers as if there were numerous rivals starting against 
them. Fraser intermingles, as usual, the real and the 
imaginative most successfully: papers on " India," "Fe- 



male Convicts," and " Naval Architecture," ballasting the 
clever fictions, " A First Friendship," and " Adrian." In 
like manner, Blackwood amuses with "Caxtoniana" and 
" The Chronicles of Carlingford," and instructs by his 
" Month's Visit to the Confederate Head Quarters ; " a 
paper on " Belligerent Rights at Sea," and a very in- 
teresting article, " Progress in China," which details the 
origin of the important expedition about to set forth un- 
der the command of Capt. Sherard Osborne. In Mac- 
mittan we have speculative papers, side by side with the 
" Water Babies " and "Vincenzo," and the semi -serious 
articles on " Whist " and the " History of Almanacks." 
The\Cornhill, again, amuses us with " Romola," "The 
Story of Elizabeth," "The Round-about Papers," and 
" The Small House at Allington ;" and frightens us with 
a mostjprofessional and illustrated article " On the Science 
of Garotting and Housebreaking." Lastly, The Intelkc- 
tual Observer, rich in scientific papers suited to lovers of 
science in all its various branches, furnishes a most in- 
teresting paper for general readers in Mr. Shirley Hib- 
berd's " Experiences of Haschisch." 



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WANTED TO PURCHASE. 

Particulars of Price, &c. of the following: Books to be sent direct to 
the gentlemen by whom they are required, and whose names and ad- 
dresses are given for that purpose : 
SMITH'S CATALOODE RAISONNE. 9 Vols. 
MOTTLEY'S DOTCH REPUBLICS. 3 Vols. 
BALLANTYNE'S NOVELISTS' LIBRARY. 10 Vols. 
HIOOIN'S ANACALYPSIS. 
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DR. SYNTAX IN SEARCH OF THE PICTURESQUE. Any complete edition. 
Wanted by Mr. Alfred John Trix, 26, High Street, Exeter. 

Engraved Portraits wanted of the following persons, 8vo size, or 
smaller: 

1. Rosala, daughter of Berengarius II. of Italy, wife of Arnold II. of 
Flanders, and of Robert King of France. (Died 995.) 

2. Berthe of Burgundy, wife of Eudes, Count of Champagne, and of 
Robert King of Franve. (Died 1016.) 

3. Bertrade de Montfort, wife of Foulques Count of Anjou, and of 
Philippe I. King of France. 

4. Eleanor of Aquitaine, wife of Louis VII. of France, and of H< 
II. of England. (Died 1204.) 

5. Agnes de M<ran, wife of Philippe II. King of France. (Died 1201 .) 

6. Marguerite of Burgundy, first wife of Louis X. of France. (Died 
1315.) 

7. Bona of Luxemburg, wife of Jean King of France. (Died 1318.) 

8. Marguerite, daughter of John Duke of Burtrundy, wife (1) of 
Dauphin Louis, and (2) of Arthur Duke of Bretagne. 

9. Marie Anne of Bavaria, wife of the Dauphin Louis (son of 

10. Maria Adelaida of Savoy, wife of Louis Duke of Burgundy (granc 
son of Louis XIV.) (Died 1712.) 

11. Josephine of Saxony and Poland, wife of Louis the Dauphin, son 
Louis XV. (Died 1767.) 

Wanted by X. Y. Z., 3, Kensington Park Gardens East, Ladbrcke 
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to 

THE INDEX TO SECOND VOLUME OF OUR THIRD SERIES will be issu 
with" N. & Q." of Saturday jiext. 

BENJAMIN EASY . We shall be glad to see the proposed Paper. 

T. S. (Forest Hill) is referred to our 1st S. iii. 40, 93, 170; v. 1 
634; viii. 62; ix. 137,/or articles on the subject o/Booty's Case. 

ERRATA._3rdS.iii. p. 5, col. i. lines 29 and 32, for "Moon" read , 

Moore; " and line 39,/or " have " read " leave." 

"NOTES AND QUERIES " is published at noon on Friday, and is also 
issued in MONTHLY PARTS. The Subscription for STAMPED COPIES for 
Six Months forwarded direct from the Publishers (including the Half- 
yearly INDEX) is 11. \d., which may be paid by Post Office Order in 
favour O/MKSSRS. BELL AND DALDY, 186, FLEET STREET, B.C.; to whom 

It COMMUNICATIONS FOB THB EDITOR should beaddressed. 



IMPORTING TEA without colour on the leaf 

prevents the Chinese passing off inferior leaves as in the usual kinds. 
Horniman's Tea is uncoloured, therefore, always good alike. Sold in 
packets by 2,280 Agents. 



S. III. JAN. 10, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



ESTABLISHED 1842. 

tun MANCHESTER AND LONDON, 

METROPOLITAN COUNTIES LIFE ASSURANCE 
SOCIETY. 



Directors. 

The Hon. R. E.Howard, D.C.L. 

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Attention is narticularlv invited to the VALUABLE NEW PRIN- 
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permission is given upon application to suspend the pa> ment at i 
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The attention of the Public is confidently invited to the several 
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The Rates of ENDOWMENTS granted to young lives, and ot ANNUITIES 
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Now ready, price 14s. 

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London: LONGMAN, GREEN, LONGMAN & ROBERTS. 



SAUCE. LEA AND PERRINS 1 

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE. 

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Now ready, 18mo, coloured wrapper, Post Free, 4d. 

AN GOUT AND RHEUMATISM. A new 

\J work, by DR. LAV1LLE of the Faculty of Medicine, Paris, ex- 
hibiting a perfectly new, certain, and safe method of cure. Translated 
by an English Practitioner. 
London: FRAS. NEWBERY & SONS, 45, St. Paul's Church Yard 



fiZONIZED COD LIVER OIL is the nearest 



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London Medici ' 

remedy are ge 

vaunted and ephemeral specifics, which are daily thrust upon us, by 



icallieview of August, 1861, states that " The merits of the 
nuine and intrinsic, nor must it be classed among the 



self-interested vendors." 

Sold by Druggists, in 2s. 6d., is. 6d., and 9s. Bottles, or of 
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HOLLOW AY'S PILLS. STRENGTH RESTORED. 
_ At this season many persons suffer from prostration of strength, 
arising m general from some disturbance of the digestion. In such 
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the pale and emaciated gain colour and weight under a course of these 
purifying Pills. They stimulate the appetite, augment the secretion 
ot gastric juice, regulate the liver, cleanse the kidneys, and act as 
ue yet efficient aperients, without griping, weakening, or incon- 
veniencing the system. In a vast majority of cases of debility, arising 
irom no perceptible cause, Hoiloway's Pills, judiciously taken, slowly 
and certainly restore order, and the invalid soon becomes stout and 



ALLIANCE LIFE AND FIRE 
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Capital-FIVE MILLIONS Sterling. 

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LIFE ASSURANCES in a variety of forms fully explained in the 

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FIRE POLICIES issued at the reduced rates for MERCANTILE 
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and Abroad. p ^ ENGELBACH, Actuary. 

Bartholomew-lane, B ank. D. M ACLAGAN, Secretary. 



rFH 



E MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY 

(A.D. 1834), 39, King Street, Cheapside, E.G., London. 
Capital on July 1, 1862, from Premiums alone, 421,429. 
Income upwards of 72,000. Assurances, 1,667,380. 
Bonuses average more than 24 per cent, per annum on sum assured. 
Profits divided Yearly, and begin on Second Premium. 
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PRIZE MEDAL MICROSCOPE. W. LADD 

JL respectfully solicits inspection of his Microscopes. They are simple 
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adapted for all accessary apparatus; combining first class with cheap- 
ness. Strongly recommended by Dr. Carpenter, in " The Microscope 
and its Revelations," page 81. 

W. LADD, 11 and 12, Beak Street, Regent Street, W. 
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THE PRETTIEST GIFT for a LADY is one of 
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JC. and J. FIELD, Original Manufacturers (in 
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NOTES AND QUERIES: 

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TOR 

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" When found, make a note of." CAPTAIN CUTTLE. 



No. 55.] 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1863. 



f With Index, price lOrf. 
i Stamped Edition, llrf. 



THE QUARTERLY REVIEW, No. CCXXV., 
will be published on WEDNESDAY NEXT. 

CONTENTS : 

I. TRAVELS IN PERU. 
II. INSTITUTES FOR WORKING MEN. 

III. CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT IN RUSSIA. 

IV. EDITIONS OF THE GREEK TESTAMENT. 
V. THE TICKET OF LEAVE SYSTEM. 

VI. THE ART LOAN EXHIBITION. 
VII. LIFE OF CHRISTOPHER NORTH. 
VIII. THE STANHOPE MISCELLANIES. 
IX. THREE YEARS OF A REFORM ADMINISTRATION. 
JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street. 



T AUS ANNE COLLEGE, for Instruction in Manu- 

JLJ factoring Art, Civil Engineering, &c., founded in 1853 by influen- 
tial Swiss Gentlemen, to provide a scientific and practical education 
for young men, without exposing them to the temptations of large 
cities. The E'cole Speciale of Lausanne is under the direction of a 
President, Council, and live Professors. The Courses of Study comprise 
three annual terms, and embrace Mathematics, including Analytical 
and Descriptive Geometry, Mechanical Drawing, Civil and Mining 
Engineering, Chemistry, Geology, and Mineralogy Students enter at 
and above the age of Seventeen. They can board "en pension" or 
with a Professor. Having to pass an examination for admission, a few 
months' preparation at Lausanne is strongly recommended. Prospec- 
tuses obtained from Andrew Pritchard, Esq., M.R.I., St. Paul's Road, 
Highbury, London, N., and R. L. Chance, Jun., Esq., Edgbaston, Bir- 
mingham, to either of whom reference is kindly permitted. N.B. 
Lausanne is a Protestant town, and has an English church. 



tes persons interested in the Subject to give him Inform- 
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41 



LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1863. 
CONTENTS. N. 55. 



Gutta Percha Copies of Seals, 45. 

Mnroa NOTES: -Sale of Venison -A Story of a Wolf- 
Feminine Names given to Men - Inscription on the Town 
House, Wittenberg Latch-string Proverb, 46. 

QUERIES : - The Ale-Yard - Anderson of Tushielaw, 
Roxburghshire Boscobel Acorns in Hyde Park Uea- 
con Brodieand " the Drop " - Fowkes of -, Co. Bucks 

Halliwell's "Nursery Rhymes of England Heath- 
cote -" Journal of a Persian Prince "-Lead inlaid in 
Tombstones Lowndes' "British Librarian" Petrus 
Ludovicus Mill Mixed Styles in Architecture Henry 
Makepeace Octangular Churches Preternatural Day 

Quotations Wanted Right of Conferring Knighthood, 
Ac., 46. 

QUERIES WITH ANSWERS : Sizergh Hall Robert Smith : 
Sprat's Account" Rogers's Three Years' Travel over Eng- 
land and Wales" Sale by the Candle The Princess 
Alexandra Singlet : Cinglet .Priory of the Holy 
Trinity, 49. 

REPLIES : Patrick Ruthven, 50 Bishops in Waiting, 51 

Smith of Braco and Stewarts of Brugh and ofBurray, 
Ib. Chief Baron James Reynolds: Baron James Rey- 
nolds, 54 Sir Roger de Qoverley, Ib. Byron's Plagiarisms, 
55 The Syriac Version of the Apocalypse, 56 Roman 
Coins found in Malabar Deflection of Chancels Swiney 
Bequests " Czarina," " Czarine " Sir Leonard Sander- 
sted Monuments in Jamaica " Liberavi animam 
meam" Reproduction of Old Witticisms, &c.,57. 

Notes on Books, &c. 



JOHN HAMPDEN. 

The papers, within the last few weeks, have 
teemed with the conflicting accounts* of the ex- 
humation of the supposed body of this celebrated 
patriot, said to have been buried in Great Hamp- 
den church. Upon the propriety and results of 
this proceeding it is not my intention to make 
any comment ; but as everything connected with 
John Hampden, the church of his parish, and his 
residence, is invested with interest, I wish to offer 
a few remarks upon the latter subject. Having 
been instructed during the past year by the trus- 
tees of the present proprietor, George Hampden 
Cameron, Esq. (a minor), to make a survey and 
report upon the general condition of the ancient 
mansion, I had a good opportunity of thoroughly 
examining the building and its contents ; and I 
can fully endorse all that has been said in a very 
well written article in Once a Week, describing 
the pictures and other curious objects enshrined 
in the rambling old house ; but I shall be glad to 



[* Which has in a great measure arisen from the cor- 
respondents of The Times having overlooked the fact, 
that the account quoted in that journal was only an ex- 
tract from the very interesting narrative which MR. 
SMITH published in " N. & Q." of the 3rd inst., ante, 
p. 11. ED. " N. & Q."] 



know from any of your readers upon what au- 
thority the assertion is made, that 

" The house of the Hampdens has occupied its present 
site since the days of King John ; he visited the master 
who owned the inheritance in his reign, and a north- 
east chamber is named after that unworthy Plantagenet. 
The guest of Griffith Hampden has left here traces in the 
venerable pile : for the state bed-room is yet called Queen 
Elizabeth's, and some of its antique hangings may have 
sheltered the Virgin Majesty of England." 

Now I would just remark, that there is not a 
vestige of the present building which can be re- 
ferred to the age of King John, although it would 
be rash to say that a building of that date never 
occupied the site. The present mansion has un- 
dergone such extensive modifications and enlarge- 
ments in modern times, that its genuine ancient 
character is concealed. The original house of 
Hampden's time was probably not much altered 
from its first design, and had the usual arrange- 
ments common to baronial houses of the fifteenth 
century. There was the south porch, from which 
you entered under the minstrel gallery into the 
great hall ; to the west were the approaches to 
the offices, and adjoining the hall were the pre- 
sence chamber, parlor, and other apartments, 
usual to mediaeval houses such are yet to be 
found intact at Lytes Cary, Somerset, Admiston 
in Dorchester, and elsewhere. They form a class 
of residences suited for squires of moderate for- 
tune, and are not on the large scale of Penshurst 
Place, Knowle, Beddington Hall, and others of 
that extensive character. 

Hampden House (proper) can still be distinctly 
traced under the metamorphosed exterior. The 
south porch is now converted into a servant's 
pantry, the mullioned windows, deeply moulded 
doorway, with label and carved terminals of the 
Edwardian age, are yet preserved. The Great 
Hall and screen also remain, though the ancient 
timber roof has given place to a more modern 
construction, and the whole apartment has un- 
dergone considerable alteration. The entrance is 
now from the west, and a very stately wing, of 
comparatively recent date, has been added to the 
east, containing some good reception rooms, with 
chamber and library over. It is the extreme 
north chamber on the ground floor of this wing 
which is known as Queen Elizabeth's Boom, 
evidently a mistake ; neither the apartment nor 
any of its furniture are of that date ; much less 
can the room in the older part of the house have 
been occupied by King John. Probably the great 
respect in which John Hampden and his wife 
Elizabeth were held gave rise to these compli- 
mentary designations. There is a very beautiful 
house at South Petherton, in Somersetshire, 
known as King Ina's Palace, whereas not a frag- 
ment of the building is earlier than the fifteenth 
century. These misapplied titles are calculated 
to mislead people and make confusion in dates. 



42 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



Externally there is nothing to recall the 
ancient form of Hampden House, with the ex- 
ception of some well proportioned octangular 
brick chimney shafts. All is changed ; stuccoed 
ornaments, sham machicolations and battlements, 
have taken the place of the features of a mediaeval 
mansion ; still the grouping of the several parts 
is very picturesque, and has an interest apart 
from its historical renown. Inside there is nothing 
architecturally to be admired ; but there are two 
or three old oak doors well worthy of remark. 
They are of massive timber framing, having the 
narrowest possible panels with the germ of the 
napkin pattern, and one of them is fitted with a 
most beautifully ornamented iron lock. The con- 
tents, however, of this remarkable house might 
form the subject of a most interesting paper; 
and it is to be hoped that a well-qualified anti- 
quary will at some opportunity undertake the 
task. BENJ. FERRET. 



SHAKSPEARIANA. 

EMENDATIONS OF SHAKSPEARE (3 rd S. ii. 502.) 
DR. LEO has just given in "N. & Q." the best 
attempt yet made at extracting sense from 

" The dram of eale 

Doth all the noble substance of a doubt, 1 
To his own scandal." Hamlet, Act I. Sc. 2. 

For eale, he reads vile ; and for doubt, draught, 
and he has, it is evident, though he has not so 
pointed it, seen that the sentence is incomplete ; 
being interrupted by the appearance of the Ghost. 

Some years ago, in my Life of Milton (p. 305), 

I had examined this passage. I saw clearly 

though the editors seem not to have been aware 
of it that the sentence was unfinished, and I 
marked it so. Observing that the 4to (1604), in 
which it occurs, reads elsewhere (Act II. Sc. 1), 
" a deale " for " a devil," I read evil for eale ; and 
for " of a doubt," I conjectured out of doubt. But 
I saw afterwards that doubt should be the name of 
some person or thing to which " substance " be- 
longed. I conjectured courtier, as Hamlet had 
been only speaking of persons, and I supposed the 
final letters might have been effaced. Conjecture, 
however, is idle, as we have only part of a con- 
text. I would read thus : 

" The dram of evil 

Doth all the noble substance of a doubt, 
To bis own scandal . . . 
Hor. Look, my Lord ! it comes." 

as doubt is most certainly wrong, and there is 
so little chance of our ever hitting on the ri^ht 
word, that I should be almost tempted to put an 
asterisk for it. 

The following passage in The Tempest has 
never been satisfactorily explained : 



** Thy banks with pioned and twilled brims, 
Which spongy April at thy best betrirns, 
To make cold nymphs chaste crowns." 

Act IV. Sc. 1. 

Omitting the various conjectures that have 
been made such as rendering " pioned " dug, and 
" twilled " ridged, or ribbed like calico, &c., so 
inapplicable to the brink of a stream, I will only 
say that it appears almost certain to me that the 
poet wrote 

" Thy banks with pioned and willow'd brims." 

From pioneer Spenser had made pioning, defence - 
work of pioneers : 

" Which to outbar, with painful pionings 
From sea to sea he heapt a mighty mound." 

F. Q. t ii. 10, 63. 

And Shakspeare, following his example, made a 
verb : pion, to fence, to secure. His idea was 
the bank of a stream, raised so as to confine the 
water, and its edge planted with willows ; while 
it was covered with primroses, violets, and other 
spring-flowers for "April showers bring forth 
May flowers." 

And is so generally pronounced without the d, 
that that letter might easily in the printer's mind 
have gone over to willow d, and so have formed 
twilled; and the change would have been still 
easier if the word was willied, for the willow is in 
some places Wiltshire, for example still called 
willy. Finally, I doubt if we should not read 
" chaste nymphs " and " cold crowns." 

" You moonlight revellers, and shades of night, 
You orphan-heirs of fixed destiny." 

Merry Wives, Act V. Sc. 5, 

Here no one has ever explained " orphan- 
heirs." Warburton proposed ouphen, which came 
near the truth. I read, "You ouphes and 
heirs." The d of and not being^ usually pro- 
nounced, even before vowels, the printer might 
easily make the mistake. I cannot tell what. 
" heirs of destiny " may be ; perhaps eldest, or fa- 
vourite children, of destiny, for Shakspeare uses 
words with great latitude. 

In " airy toys," a line or two after, we should 
pronounce " toyes," as it rimes with " o-yes ;" 
and though Mr. Collier excels in the correction 
of his unlucky folio, and other critics adopt it, it 
is perfectly needless, as "shall you leap" and 
" hearths unswept " are perfectly right : only, 
"unswept" should be pronounced, and perhaps 
written, unswep. There is not a housemaid in 
London that would not say swep, and, moreover, 
it is perfectly correct ; for it is merely an apoco- 
pated participle, of which we have so many. In 
King John, for example, we have in one scene 
(Act IV. Sc. 1) create for created, and heat for 
heated. In the same play (Act V. Sc. 2), in the 
line, 






3 rd S. III. JAN. 17, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



43 



" This unheard sauciness and boyish troops," 
I, therefore, read unbeard, i. e. unbearded, beard- 
less. THOS. KEIGHTLEY. 

INSUIT : " ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL," 
ACT V. Sc. II. In the Elizabethan times 
there was a tendency, among the more learned 
and refined, to prefer the Latin negative prefix 
" in " to the English " un." The change was some- 
times made as giving a more unusual and (sup- 
posedly) euphonic and literate form ; but in other 
cases, " in" was used in the always allowed pri- 
vilege of forming new negatives : as, for instance, 
in "inaidable" and "intenible" in this same 
play, and in "inexecrable" in the Merchant of 
Venice a word which, though it has fallen, I 
know not why, under the censure of commentators, 
clearly means, not able to be sufficiently exe- 
crated. Another euphuistic and learned fancy 
was, not merely to coin new words and com- 
pounds, but to use old, or coin similar sound- 
ing words, according to an etymology, and in a 
sense different to the word in ordinary use : and 
this not only for the sake of an alliterative con- 
ceit, but also for use in courtly conversation. 
Among such changes, those of words beginning 
with " in" or " en," or " im," were easy ; and we 
have accordingly such words as to " inhabit" as a 
Latinised negative, and "indurance" as imprison- 
ment. So also, in AWs Well that Ends Well, the 
euphuistic court-gallant, Bertram, tells how a 
noble lady threw him a ring from a window, 
thinking he stood ingaged, i. e. not gaged, or not 
engaged, but free to marry : the intended mean- 
ing being plain when the mind recovers from the 
similarity of sound with engaged ; and when we 
are told that he having informed her of his state, 
and inability to answer her honourably, she then 
desisted from her suit. 

These considerations, and the remembrance of 
Shakspeare's remarkably frequent and facile use 
of legal terms, will, I think, render one more 
ready to allow that in the pleading, which ends 
with the well-known lines 

" in fine, 

Her insuit cunning and her modern grace 
Subdued me to her rate," 

the context demands that " insuit" should be 
taken as the adjectival form of "nonsuit;" and 
that " insuit cunning" means, the cunning which 
did not grant the suit. In other words, that 
while " suit " is that which the agent sues for, 
Diana's " insuit cunning" is not as it otherwise 
would be, the cunning which did not make suit ; 
but, in strict accordance with legal phraseology, 
the cunning which nonsuited the cause pleaded 
before her. Driven through fear of a second 
forced marriage to slander Diana, Bertram is put 
to it to explain away the fact that he gave a heir- 
loom as a present, and, as it were, as a betrothal 



present to a common courtesan ; and his plea is 
as follows : 

" I liked her, and she knowing it kept at a tempting 
distance ; seeing me a youth, and a prize worth playing 
for, she angled for me, threw herself in my way ; and 
when she saw me tempted by the bait, drew off, mad- 
dening my eagerness and my important blood by her 
restraint : "for you know, my Lord, that all lets to the 
enjoyment of a fancy are incentives which increase that 
fancy ; in fine, and as a summing up of the whole argu- 
ment, her cunning that denied uiy suit, and that mode- 
rate share of good looks which as you see she possesses " 
(for he artfully mingles a fact with his fiction, but pre- 
tends to underestimate that which really took him, that 
he may magnify her art and cunning and enforce his 
argument,) " these brought me to her terms she got 
the ring." 

" Coming," the old reading, might perhaps be 
taken as part of Bertram's affected phraseology, 
which would make " insuit" a substantive ; but 
in the absence of a parallel use of " coming with," 
Walker seems to have given sufficient evidence of 
the frequency of the interchange of " coming" and 
" cunning" in the older editions. BENJ. EASY. 

SHAKSPEARE ILLUSTRATION (1 st S. vi. 313, 393; 
vii. 44, 178.) " Happy low lie down," Hen. IV. 
Part II. Act. III. S. 1. This phrase sometimes 
since engaged the attention of several learned cor- 
respondents, who, however, all failed to perceive 
that " lowlie down " is a proverbial phrase for the 
person of humble station, as Coleridge suggested. 
This is proved by a sonnet of W. Browne, a con- 
temporary of Shakspeare, in which occurs the 
following lines : 

"The humble violet, that lowlie down, 
Salutes the gay nymphs as they trimly pass." 

The sonnet will be found in a Collection of W. 
Browne s Sonnets printed at the Egerton Press, and 
of which there is a copy in the British Museum. 
EDEN WARWICK. 



MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS OF THE DIXON 
FAMILY, IN BEESTON CHAPEL YARD, PARISH 
OF LEEDS. 

Perhaps the Editor of " KT. & Q." will allow 
the underwritten to be preserved in his pages, 
than which none better can be for the purpose. 
It was transcribed a few months ago for my 
brother, Mr. James Henry Dixon, by a friend 
whose brief notes as to the state of the tombs had 
better accompany the transcription. 

No. 1. Here lyeth the body Here lyeth the body of 

ofABRAH Elizabeth, late wife of 

ABRA . . . Dixon that was 

. . . . October .... bvryed Aprel the 8 th day, 
1671. 1670. 

[Illegible. Persons apparently walk over this stone 
diagonally.] 

No. 2. Here lyeth the body of Elizabeth, daughter of 
Raphe Dixon, bvryed the 3 rd of October, 1678. 



44 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



Rachel, y Daughter of Raphe Dixon, was bvryed 
here Norember 6 th , 1682. 

No. 3. Mariah y e daughter of Raphe Dixon, was 
bvryed in this place May 28 th , 1683. 

No. 4. Abraham, the son of Raphe Dixon, was 
bnryed here the 18 th day of August, 1G83. 

Also here are deposited the remains of Thomas, son of 
Samuel Dixon, Gentleman, of Beeston, who departed 
this life November 26, 1823, aged 49 years. 

No. 5. Here lyeth the Body of Rob. Dixon who dyed 
y 25 th day of March, 1709. 

[Nearly illegible.] 

No. 6. Here lieth the body of John, the son of John 
Dixon, who departed this life August 13 b , 1731, aged 
7 years. 

Also John, the son of Samuel Dixon, who died Feb. 9 th , 
17-4, aged 3 years. Also Ralph, the son of the above 
said Samuel Dixon, who died Aug* 23 rd , 1768, in the 2 nd 
year of his age. 

[This stone was nearly overgrown with grass, which 
had to be pulled up to get the inscription. No. 1. to 6 
are atones laid flat on the ground and unbroken.] 

No. 7. Here lieth interred the body of Rebekah, the 
wife of M r John Dixon of Beeston, who departed her 
life April 23 rd , 1764, aged 75 years. Also the above said 
M*- John Dixon, who departed this life May 11 th , 1764, 
aged 80 years. 

[An altar tomb about J y d out of the ground.] 

No. 8. Sacred to the Memory of Samuel Dixon, o^ 
Beeston, Merchant, who died Oct r 22*, 1809, aged 80 
years. Also of Margaret Dixon, wife of the above, who 
died June 6 th , 1806, aged 73 years. 

Here also lie the remains of their daughters Elizabeth 
Dixon, who died in 1793, aged 32 years. Sarah Dixon, 
who died in 1795, aged 30 years. Martha Dixon, who 
died in FebT, 1813, aged 50 years. Mary Dixon, who 
died May 26*, 1837, aged 78 years. Also Frances Dixon, 
daughter of the above, who died April 2 nd , 1840, aged 21 
years. 

Also Harriet Gassiot, widow, youngest daughter of the 
above Samuel and Margaret Dixon, who died 2 nd De- 
cember, 1848, aged 78 years. 

[An altar tomb in good condition and well cut. I did 
not find any of the " Wrights' " tombs or any other col- 
lateral branches of the family. The stones are unbroken, 
but those laid flat would be better raised up and the 
ground levelled &c., and laid down again.] 

K. W. DIXON. 

Seaton-Carew, co. Durham. 



"SPIRITUAL SONGS." 

Most of the readers of " N". & Q." who take in- 
terest in such things are aware of the existence of 
a curious volume, entitled 

" Ane Compendious Booke of Godly and Spirituall 
Songs, collectit out of sundrie partes of the Scripture; 
with snndrie of other Ballates changed out of prophafne 
Sanges, for avoyding of sinne and harlotrie." 

This little book, which was first printed at 
Edinburgh in the year 1597, was reprinted in the 
same city in 1600 and 1621 ; and lastly, as a 



literary curiosity, in 1801. The above title is 
copied from the edition of 1621. 

In some of these spiritual songs, the intention 
of the author was evidently to endeavour to sub- 
stitute them for the profane songs in vogue among 
his countrymen, by adapting the words of the 
former to the tunes of the latter. Sometimes, 
indeed, the very words of the profane songs are 
used, in order, no doubt, to render the change less 
distasteful. The seventy-eighth song, for instance, 
commences thus : 

" Johne, cum kis me now, 
Johne, cum kis me now : 
Johne, cum kis me by and by, 
And make no more adow. 

The Lord thy God I am, 
That John dois thee call, 

John represents man 
By grace Celestiall," &c. 

At Song 102, we have the following : 

" The Paip that Pagane, full of pryd, 

Hec has us blinded lang: 
For where the blind the blind doe gyde, 
No wonder both goe wrang, 

Of all iniquitie, 

Like Prince and King hee led the ring : 
Hay trix, trim goe trix, under the greenewood 
tree," &c. 

My present object, however, is to call attention 
to another little volume of a similar character, 
which I have lately met with, and respecting 
which I can obtain no information but what is sup- 
plied by the book itself. This is the more sur- 
prising, as it was published so recently as the 
year 1823. The full title is as follows : 

"A Collection of Spiritual Songs. [The following 
Songs, written at different periods, during this and the 
last two centuries, being now in few hands, and having 
suffered much from the carelessness of transcribers, it 
was thought proper to publish them in this corrected 
form for preservation, as a specimen of the genius of the 
times]. 1823." 

There is no name of place, editor, or publisher. 
Although it is stated to be a Collection of Songs 
"written at different periods," the style is so 
similar throughout that I cannot help suspecting it 
to be the work of a single author. It is intended 
for the use of Roman Catholics ; and the hymns, 
or songs, which are adapted to popular tunes, are 
frequently very successful imitations of the style 
of the profane or secular songs which they aim 
at supplanting, as the following examples will 
show : 

" SONG XV. 

" THE HAPPY MAN. 

" Tune ' Mill, Mill, O.' 

" What tho' my station is but, low? 

My soul is full as great 0, 
As theirs who highest places fill. 
And live in pomp and state O. 



3'* S. III. JAN. 17, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



45 



One God creates both them and me, 

From equal nothing draws : 
I can enjoy as well as they, 

That great eternal Cause 0." &c. 

SONG XVII. 

" THE ORIGIN OF RANTS. 
" Tune, ' Killycranliy' 

" When Satan, once upon a day, 

Was seated on his throne man, 
Consulting with his fellow fiends, 

What means he should fall on man ; 
In order to delude poor souls, 

And get them in his power man, 
That he might them torment, and for 

Eternity devour man. 

" Some gave for counsel this or that, 

As did seem best to them man, 
And of their counsel some he took, 

And some he did condemn man. 
At last a merry de'il came in, 

Whose pleasure was in dancing, 
And thus he spoke, as to the throne 

He was with haste advancing : 

Qnoth he, My Lord, I do conceive, 

That we may make sure game Sir; 
And bring fast numbers to our claws, 

Of poor deluded men Sir : 
We must invent some pleasant means 

To lead them on to sin Sir ; 
And fill their minds with, mirth and glee, 

And then we'll hook them in Sir. 

" ' Suppose we should have here and there, 

In every country side Sir, 
A house belonging to ourselves, 

Where we might safely bide Sir. 
Whose master often would invite, 

Both lads and lasses fine Sir ; 
As if to pass a winter night, 

And pass their idle time Sir,' " &c. 

" SONG XXXI. 

" ON TRANSUBSTANTIATION. 

" Tune ' Slack Laddie.' 

" Onr Laddies pretending true faith to annoy, 
And make truth a liar, on sense thev rely, : 
But substance by senses no man can descry, 
Sense reaches but symptoms, my Laddies. 

" All our human reason true faith still must guide, 
And senses to reason, as servants abide ; 
When reason superior is once laid aside, 
Can sense be a rule to our Laddies? 

" The bread which we eat in our bodies we see 
Substantially changed, so we must agree, 
The bread that Christ eat, behoved to be 
Chang'd into his body, my Laddies," &c. 

Can any of your readers inform me where, and 
under what circumstances this extraordinary book 
was published, and who was the author or editor ? 
There is no indication of any license or permis- 
sion to print, as is, I believe, usually the case 
with Roman Catholic books of devotion. 

HENRY HUTH. 



GUTTA PERCHA COPIES OF SEALS. 

In my search after examples of mediaeval seals, 
I have often been foiled by the inability of willing 
correspondents to take copies of impressions by 
means of gutta percha. Nothing can be more 
easy, pleasant, or safe : so much so, that a lady 
or a child may practise it for mere amusement. 
The seal, more especially if it be soiled and dusty, 
is actually improved by the process, since the 
gutta percha removes every particle of dust with- 
out injury to the wax of the seal ; and when a mould 
is once obtained it is imperishable, and capable of 
producing any number of fac-similes. If you con- 
sider the following instructions suited to the pages 
of "N". & Q.," I think that they would go far to 
assist this rapidly advancing pursuit ; and wher6 
I prove to be obscure I shall be most happy, if 
asked, to explain myself more clearly. 

Take one or two pieces of the best gutta percha 
of about half an ounce each, and allow them to 
stand in a covered pan of warm water by the fire, 
until they are softened throughout. A tempera- 
ture of about 170 is sufficient; for above this, 
the gutta percha is less easy to manage by a be- 
ginner. Remove one of the pieces when soft, and 
dab it lightly with a silk handkerchief to dry it. 
Knead it well with the fingers, and roll it in the 
hand into the form of a polished round ball. 
Then pinch it flat, and pull it as nearly as pos- 
sible to the size and shape of the seal to be copied. 
With a large camel's-hair pencil one side is now to 
be brushed over with bronze-powder, until it is well 
covered ; and this surface is to be applied to the 
seal, laid flat on the table, or, what is better, on 
a small plate of tin or glass. If careful pressure 
be now applied to the gutta percha, it insinuates 
itself into every depression of the seal ; and in a 
few minutes is ready for removal, presenting a 
perfect mould or cast of the impression. This 
mould may be used to produce any number of 
fac-similes of the original seal, by the same pro- 
cess which has just been gone through ; for cold 
gutta percha does not adhere to the same material 
in a moderately warm and soft state, more espe- 
cially if the bronze-powder be used. Where the 
seal is thick, having perhaps both an obverse and 
reverse, it is better to place the gutta percha un- 
dermost, having first covered it with the bronze- 
powder ; which may be bought at B. Smith's, 107, 
Fleet Street, of course, not far from the office 
of " N. & Q." 

The bronze-powder which I prefer, and chiefly 
use, is known as " copper bronze ;" and is finer, 
and less liable to tarnish than most others. The 
superfluous gutta percha, pressed out at the edge 
of the seal, may afterwards be removed by a 
sharp knife or left on, as thought best. M. D. 



46 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[8*4 S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



&att*. 

SALE OF VENISON. The following is extracted 
from Prior's Life of Malone : 

" The origin of venison being sold by fishmongers was 
this. Many noblemen having more bucks than they had 
occasion for, wished to dispose of them, but were ashamed 
to take money. They, therefore, sent them to their fish- 
mongers and received fish in return. This practice com- 
menced about forty years ago; and the fishmongers still 
continue to sell venison, though they do not obtain it in 
the same way : for the owners of Parks now feel no reluc- 
tance in receiving cash for a certain number of bucks 
every season, at a stipulated price." 

I have letters, bills, and receipts, which prove 
that " owners of Parks " " contracted " to supply 
" a certain number of bucks " at a fixed price, 
more than one hundred and forty years ago that 
is, from 1718 to 1730 ; that there was a good deal 
of haggling before a price was agreed on ; refer- 
ences made to prices obtained by certain noble- 
men and gentlemen to prices given by dealers in 
London and Epsom which latter place appears 
to have been a large consumer ; and some angry 
discussion, after delivery, about the quality and 
condition of the buck ; in brief, that the sale was 
conducted much as it is now : when some ex- 
change with fishmongers, some sell in the market, 
and some will not sell at all. S. O. V. 

A STORY OF A WOLF. In the Philosopher's 
Banquet, 1614, 8, W. B., the author tells, at 
p. 201, the following story : 

"It was credibly informed me by a friend of mine long 
resident in Ireland, of one that, travelling in an Evening 
betwixt two townes in that country, some three miles 
distant, was three several times set upon by a wolfe, from 
whose jawes by his sword he so oft delivered himselfe ; 
approaching neare the towne where he was bent, he in- 
countered a friend of his travayling all unarmed towards 
the towne fro whence he came, unto whom (advising him 
of his peril and assault, accounting himselfe secure so 
neare the towne) he lent his sword. Now, having parted 
and divided themselves some little distance, this olde 
wolfe sets upon his new guest, who finding him armed 
with the other's weapon, presently leaves him, making 
after the other with all speede he might : overtooke him, 
before he came to the towne, assaulted, and slew him." 

A similar story is related, I believe, by Christo- 
pher Farewell, in his Indian Colation, 1633, 
p. 17; but as I have not the book at hand, I can- 
not ascertain just now whether the two tales are 
identical. If such be the case, there can be little 
or no doubt, more especially as there was an edi- 
tion of the Philosopher's Banquet in 1632, that 
Farewell was indebted for his narrative to W. B., 
who had printed it nineteen years before. 

W. CAREW HAZLITT. 

FEMININE NAMES GIVEN TO MEN. Maria and 
Anne are frequently conferred upon male in- 
fants, especially in France and Spain; but the 
name of the infant son of Don Sebastian of Spain 



is the first instance I have seen of Isabel as a 
masculine name. The new Almanach de Gotha 
gives the little Prince as " Don Frangois Marie 
Isabel Gabriel Pierre, ne 20 Aout, 1861." 

HERMENTRUDE. 

INSCRIPTION ON THE TOWN HOUSE, WITTEN- 
BERG. 

" Ist's'Gottes werk, so wird's bestehen ; 

Ist's Menschens, so wird's untergehen." 
" If God's work, it will aye endure, 
If man's, 'tis not a moment sure." 

The Athenaum, Nov. 10, 1838, p. 808. 
GRIME. 

LATCH-STRING PROVERB. A young lady once 
declared, in my presence, that she never would 
marry ; and was immediately checked by her old 
grandmamma saying : " It's no use holding the 
latch, when nobody pulls at the string." This 
old proverb undoubtedly dates back to the days 
of Little Red Riding- Hood, whose grandmother 
called to the wolf: " Pull at the string, my dear, 
and the door will open." In my own case, I 
have no doubt that grandmamma's retort greatly 
shortened my courtship of the young lady, who is 
now my wife. M. D. 



THE ALE-YARD. jl have lately been presented 
by a tavern-keeper, in whose bar-parlour it had 
hung from time immemorial, with a specimen of 
the Ale- Yard, being the first which I have seen. 
I would describe it as a trumpet-shaped glass 
vessel, exactly a yard in length, the narrow end 
being closed, and expanded into a large ball. Its 
internal capacity is a little more than a pint, and 
when filled with ale many a thirsty tyro has been 
challenged to empty it without taking away his 
mouth. This is no easy task. So long as the 
tube contains fluid it flows out smoothly, but 
when air reaches the bulb it displaces the liquor 
with a splash, startling the toper, and compelling 
him, involuntarily, to withdraw his mouth, by the 
rush of the cold fluid over his face and dress. I 
shall feel obliged by any further information upon 
the Ale-Yard and its history. M. D. 

ANDERSON OF TUSHIELAW, ROXBURGHSHIRE. 
Wanted, some account of this family ; more par- 
ticularly, of one of the family who married a 
Miss Pringle about the end of last century : his 
wife, and their issue, if any. 2. 0. 

BOSCOBEL ACORNS IN HYDE PARK. The en- 
closed cutting, from The Times, appeared in that 
paper on the 18th of December, 1862. The 
words which I have underlined, in order that they 
may be reprinted in italics, need no other remark 
than the obvious one, that the " local historian " 



3'd S. III. JAN. 17, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



47 



of The Times needs a little more education on the 
subject of " Relics of the Past." The mistakes in 
The Times throw an air of so much absurdity 
upon the whole statement, that any jreader of 
" N. & Q.," who possesses the information, would 
be gratifying many persons probably besides my- 
self if he would say whether the tree is really 
standing, and in what condition. 

" RELIC OF THE PAST IN HYDE PARK. Perhaps few 
of the many who visit this Park are aware that on the 
right-hand side of the carriage-drive, between the Re- 
ceiving-house and the bridge, there still remains an in- 
teresting relic of the Stuart: period. It is a tree, one of 
two planted by Charles II. from acorns taken from the 
Boscobel oak, in Somersetshire, in which his father success- 
fully sought refuge, and were planted here to commemorate 
the event. They have both been dead some years ; and 
one, much decayed, was removed in 1854; the other, 
beautifully clothed with ivy, which gives it the appear- 
ance of life, still remains. In common with all the other 
old trees in the Park, it is protected by a fence of iron 
hurdles ; but surely a relic like this deserves a handsome 
and appropriate railing, with a descriptive brass plate 
affixed to point out to strangers this historical antiquity, 
now known only to local historians." Times, Dec. 18, 
1862. 

D.P. 

DEACON BRODIE AND " THE DROP." This 
unfortunate individual, who invented our present 
instrument of execution, and ^ho was the first to 
suffer by it for robbing the Bank in Edinburgh, 
was, report says, a man of good family and well 
connected. I have seen most of the printed ac- 
counts of his trial and execution, but still lack 
information as to his birth and connections. Any 
such will be thankfully received. 2. e. 

FOWKES OF , Co. BUCKS, married Anne> 

another daughter of Roger Duncombe, of Litling- 
ton Park, Bedfordshire. Information respecting 
him is wanted. JAMES KNOWLES. 

HALLIWELL'S "NURSERY RHYMES or ENG- 
LAND." Can any correspondent supply answers 
to those rhymes in the " Seventh Class Rid- 
dles," to which Mr. Halliwell has, by his silence, 
confessed himself unable to play the (Edipus? 
I allude to those numbered in the sixth edition, 
191, 199, 200, 229, 234-236. There are other 
rhymes in this little book which, ni fallor, ought 
to have been classed with the riddles : for ex- 
ample, No. 50, " Robbin the Bobbin," means the 
sea; No. 652, a pair of tongs. 

I may take this opportunity of saying, that MR. 
REYNOLDS (3 rd S. iii. 10) will find in " Nursery 
Rhymes " a better version of " There was an old 
woman toss'd up in a blanket " than " the two 
young ladies " supplied him with, and one, I be- 
lieve, oftener heard in the nursery than Mr. 
Chappel's quoted by the Editor. DAVUS SUM. 

HEATHCOTE. Can any one tell me who was 
the father of Michael Heathcote, of Buxton and 
Hartington, co. Derby, who in 1750 married 



Rachael Edensor of Hartington ? (See Ward's 
History of Stohe-upon- Trent, p. 562, andLysons's 
Derbyshire, 175.) C. S. P. 

" JOURNAL OF A PERSIAN PRINCE." A writer 
in the current number of the National Review 
(xxxi. p. 10), refers to the " Journal of a Persian 
Prince Najeef Koolee Meerza," written twenty- 
six years ago, as illustrative of that inexactness 
of the Oriental mind in respect of numbers, and 
of rhetorical exaggeration, which appears to some 
people the simplest solution of the numerical 
difficulties in the Pentateuch. The Review, how- 
ever, gives no exact reference to any particular 
passage, nor does it state whether or under what 
title this Journal was published, or what evidence 
there is of its genuineness. Perhaps some of your 
readers can supply information on these points. 

X. X. 

LEAD INLAID IN TOMBSTONES. At the close 
of a visit to Dunfermline Abbey, I observed some 
fragments of a tombstone, the inscription of which 
appeared to have been incised, and the lines filled 
with lead. I was struck with this, as I do not 
remember ever to have seen or heard of such a 
thing; but time did not then allow me to de- 
cipher, much less to copy, the inscription. Is 
such a mode of inlaying common, and when did it 
prevail ? J. SAN. 

Natal, South Africa. 

LOWNDES' BRITISH LIBRARIAN. It has often 
seemed strange to me that Lowndes' Biblio- 
grapher's Manual, while it abounds in books 
that are utterly worthless, or of merely facti- 
tious value, is so meagre and defective as re- 
gards theological literature. It appears, how- 
ever, that Mr. Lowndes intended publishing a 
separate manual of theological works. Some 
time ago I saw in the library of a friend in Scot- 
land a fair-sized 8vo. vol. entitled (as well as I 
remember) Lowndes' British Librarian, contain- 
ing Works relating to Religion. My friend told 
me that he had bought it in numbers about 
twenty years ago, but that the publisher failed, 
and the work did not get beyond the letter B or 
C. Mr. Bonn, in his reprint of Lowndes, makes 
no mention of this, so far as I can find. Will 
you kindly give me some more information about 
this work, and let me know if Mr. Lowndes left 
the work complete and ready for the press ? I 
have got the following cutting from some book- 
seller's catalogue : 

" Lowndes Biographical and Bibliographical Notes of 
Authors and their Works, accompanied by critical and 
illustrative Remarks, intended for publication as a Sup- 
plement to Lowndes' Bibl. Manual. Several thousand MS. 
slips, arranged in alphabetical order, in a neatly-made 
wainscot case, with four sliding trays, lock and key, 
51. os." 

ElRIONNACH. 



48 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 1 * S. III. JAN. 



PETRUS LUDOVICUS MILL. The following in- 
scription is to be found on a gravestone in the 
Catholic chapel at Brigg, co. Lincoln. Who was 
Mr. Mill, and from what country an exile ? 

"Hie situs est Petrus Ludovicus Mill sacerdos, ob 
catholicara professionem actus in exilium ; vixit annos 88. 
Decessit 9 Mali, 1822. E. J. P." 

GRIME. 

MIXED STYLES IN ARCHITECTURE. Can your 
readers direct me to a passage in an author who 
says, mixed styles in music cause as uneasy a 
sensation as viewing mixed styles in architec- 
ture ? A. R. I. B. A. 

HENRY MAKEPEACE, of Somersetshire, married 
Luce, daughter of Roger Buncombe of Litling- 
ton Park, Bedfordshire, shortly before or after 
1600. I shall be glad to be informed as to his 
family and himself. JAMES KNOWLES. 

OCTANGULAR CHURCHES. These, I imagine, 
are rare. In my knowledge of some hundreds of 
specimens, I do not remember one of this shape, 
strictly ancient. Indeed, the only examples I can 
call to mind are Stoney-Middleton, Derbyshire, 
and St. Dunstan's (W.), London. One, however, 
which I have not seen, Ayott St. Peter's, Herts, 
has been lately demolished to make way for some- 
thing more to the taste of this church-restoring 
age. Is any reader of "N. & Q." able to say 
what it was like. " A curiosity in its way," says 
The Guardian paper, " but the interior was ill- 
arranged ; and the rector has erected in its stead 
a building with more pretensions to be styled an 
ecclesiastical edifice." R. L x M. 

PRJETERNATURAL DAY. Can any of your 
readers refer me to an account of a prseternatural 
day recorded in the Chinese Chronicles ? W. M. 

QUOTATIONS WANTED. From whom are the 
following lines quoted ? They are given in First 
Steps to Botany, by James L. Drummond, M.D., 
8vo, 1831, from " an American poet " : 

" The floor is of sand, like the mountain drift, 

And the pearl shells spangle the flinty snow; 
From coral rocks the sea-plants lift 

Their boughs where the tides and billows flow : 
The water is calm and still below, 

For the winds and the waves are absent there, 
And the sands are as bright as the stars that glow 

In the motionless fields of upper air." 

LUCY PEACOCK. 



' Quand on a tout perdu 

Et qu'on n'a plus d'espoir, 
La vie est un opprobre 
Et la mort un devoir." 

' The fortunate have whole years, 

In those they choose ; 
The unfortunate have only days, 
And those they lose." 



H. 



F. R. R. 



The words to a MS. glee, by an eminent com- 
poser, begin and end thus : 

" Flow limpid stream, as on thy wave 
I cast this wither'd votive flow'r. 



No rock, no storm so pitiless is there, 
As my obdurate and adored fair." 

The intermediate lines are wanting. Could the 
name of the poet be supplied ? If the verses are 
not a modern imitation of Ben Jonson, they would 
seem at least to belong to the period in which he 
wrote. P. S. H. 

RIGHT OF CONFERRING KNIGHTHOOD. A list 
of those persons (other than viceroys) to whom 
this power has been ceded by the sovereign, and 
of the instances in which they exercised it, would 
be very desirable. 

William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle, in 
enumerating his honours and privileges on the 
title-page of his well-known work on Horseman- 
ship, refers to his " power to make knights." 
Mr. Howard, in his Memorials, p. 10, says that 
Sir Thomas Wyndham (son of Sir John W. of 
Felbrigge, by Margaret, fourth d. of John, first 
D. of Norfolk), " was with Sir Edward Howard, 
and knighted by him." 

Sir Edward, who thus knighted his first cousin, 
was Standard Bearer to Hen. VIII., High Ad- 
miral and K.G. elect. S. T. 

FAMILY OF STANYSBY OF DERNETON IN THE 
BISHOPRIC OF DURHAM. I have in my posses- 
sion a grant of arms, bearing date 1543, from 
Christopher Barker, Principal-King-of-Arms, to 
"Roberte Stanysby, Esq., of Derneton in the 
Bishoppricke of Durham." 

Is anything known of this family ? Should there 
be any member of it now living, and interested in 
his pedigree, I should be happy to send him the 
deed. H. M. RICE. 

South Hill Rectory. 

JANET TAYLOR, ELGINSHIRE . I have heard 
an Elginshire proverb, " Ye may wipe your 
mouth after Janet Taylor," implying, as far as I 
understand, that no matter how much one tries, 
one can't do so well as the aforesaid Janet. Who 
was Janet Taylor ? 2. 0. 

" VEGETIUS DE RE MILITARI." Paris : Chris- 
tian Wechel, A.D. 1532. This work contains a 
number of quaint illustrations of military machines 
and contrivances; at pages 106-7 and 180-181 
are representations of divers under water, and 
the apparatus used. Opposite page 1 a whole 
page illustration of a halbardier (repeated at 
p. 182), very much in the style of Burgkmair's 
Triumphs of Maximilian. Any information re- 
specting the artists who executed these wood- 
cuts will be much appreciated by SIGMA-TAU. 

Cape Town, S. Africa. 



3 rd S. III. JAN. 17, '03.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



font!) 

SIZERGH HALL. At Sizergh Hall, in ^the 
county of Westmoreland, the seat of the ancient 
family of Strickland, is a room called the Queen's 
Chamber, traditionally said to be haunted by the 
spectre of one of the English Queens. Can any 
correspondent of " N. & Q." inform me by which ? 
Unless my memory plays me false, it is by one of 
the consorts of King Henry VIII. What con- 
nection had either he or any of his wives with 
Sizergh ? 

The Queen's Chamber has been a subject for 
both pen and pencil. Some few of the lines I can 
recollect, which were written I think by Mrs. 
Howitt, but most have been forgotten, nor do I 
know the source to refer to : 

' By the mirror of silver a pale lady stands, 
And braids her dark tresses, and wrings her white 
hands." 

OXONIENSIS. 

There is a tradition that Queen Katherine Parr re- 
sided for some time at Sizergh Hall after the death of 
Henry VIII., and that the principal bed-room there was 
occupied by her. " This perhaps may be true," says Dr. 
Burn, " that the said Queen might be admitted to retire 
to this place after the King's death ; but it did not then 
belong to the crown, but to the Strickland family. Nor 
could the Queen reside here long, for she married again 
so soon after the King's death, that had she then proved 
pregnant it was said that it would be doubtful to what 
husband the child should belong." {History of Westmore- 
land, i. 103, ed. 1777.) The King died in London in 
January, 1547 ; and Queen Katherine departed this life 
in September, 1548, at Sudeley in Gloucestershire. Mr. 
C. Nicholson, in his Annals of Kendal, p. 104, ed. 1861, 
states that " another error occurs in the appropriation of 
this room to the Queen, from the belief that the arms of 
England and France, which are carved in oak, and placed 
over the fire-place, are designed to commemorate Queen 
Katherine: Avhereas, they are really those of Queen 
Elizabeth, Avith the red dragon and lion as supporters, 
and as motto Vivat Regina, 1569."] 

EGBERT SMITH : SPRAT'S ACCOUNT. I have 
a reference, I think from Macaulay's History 
[vol. i. p. 534, ed. 1856], to " Robert Smith's In- 
formation in the Appendix to ' Sprat's Account.' " 
As I am far from books here, will any one who 
has access to Sprat inform me what this " Informa- 
tion " is about ? Am I right in supposing it has 
something to do with the Campbells of Cessnock, 
implicated in the Eye House Plot ? Is there any 
information about Robert Smith, who he was, 
where he came from, &c. ? 2. 0. 

[The document is entitled " The Information of Robert 
Smith, formerly of the parish of Dunscore, in the Sherif- 
dom of Dumfries, in the Kingdom of Scotland," and is 
dated " Whitehall, 24 Feb. 1683-4." It contains a cir- 
cumstantial account of his connection with the rising of 
the Covenanters in 1679 ; of his flight to Holland in 1682 
to join the other refugees, who suspecting him to be a 
spy, requested him "to take the Covenant and the 
Sacrament with a solemn protestation that he was still 
(as he had been in former times) an enemy to the king 
and the present government. All which he refused to 



do ; and was then debarred for ever from their meetings 
and company." In the course of his narrative he states 
that when the rebels reached Cesnock they "received 
Tour hundred lances, which we were told were the free 
and voluntary gift of Sir Hugh Campbell, the father, 
and Sir George, the son."] 

" ROGERS'S THREE YEARS' TRAVELS OVER ENG- 
LAND AND WALES." Is there any account extant 
of the author of a small work bearing this title ? 
During what years were the travels performed? 
In my copy of the ( ,work, which is the second edi- 
tion, and is dated 1697, no years are specified, 
though the days of the months are in some in- 
stances given, nor can I discover any allusion to 
any events which might enable me to fix the 
precise dates of the travels. LLALLAWG. 

[The first edition of this work appeared in 1694. Mr. 
Rogers is a myth, as we learn from the Preface of the en- 
larged edition of 1707, stated on the title-page to be 
" The Second Edition," and which also has the name of 
the real author, viz. the Rev. James Brome, M.A. Rector 
of Cheriton in Kent, Vicar of the adjoining parish of 
Newington, and Chaplain to the Five Ports. He also 
published Somner's Treatise of the Roman Ports. He 
died in 1719. With unaffected simplicity, no doubt, he 
complains that "some false copies had stolen clandes- 
tinely into the -world under the specious title ' of Mr. 
Rogers's Three Years' Travels over England and Wales, 
which are indeed so unadvisedly patched together, so 
wretchedly curtailed, so horribly imperfect, and abomi- 
nably erroneous, that the right author was obliged in his 
own vindication to publish from his own true manu- 
script a more authentick copy." In this edition the date 
of the year is not stated.] 

SALE BY THE CANDLE. Will you or some of 
your enlightened correspondents inform me what 
"sale by the candle" means? How were sales 
effected, and when did this mode of sale obtain 
and cease ? W. A. P. 

[The origin of the expression " sale by the candle," or 
" by the inch of the candle," arose from the employment 
of candles as the means of measuring time, it being de- 
clared that no one lot of goods should continue to be 
offered to. the biddings of the persons who were present 
for a longer time than would suffice for the burning of 
one inch of candle. The method of it is thus : Notice is 
usually given in writing or by advertisement when the 
sale is to begin; against which time the goods are 
divided into lots, and the Conditions of Sale circulated. 
During the time of the bidding a small piece, of about 
an inch, of wax candle is burning ; and the last bidder, 
when the candle goes out, has the lot or parcel exposed 
to sale. Some consider this custom to have been bor- 
rowed from the Church of Rome, where there is an ex- 
communication by inch of candle, and the sinner is 
allowed to come to repentance before final excommunica- 
tion, while yet the candle burns.] 

THE PRINCESS ALEXANDRA. Is the Princess 
Alexandra of Denmark descended from the Prin- 
cess Caroline Matilda of England, sister of George 
III. ? And if so, through which of her children ? 
Queen Caroline Matilda left a son and a daugh- 
ter. A. C. 

[The Princess Alexandra descends from George II., 
not through his granddaughter Caroline Matilda of 



50 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



England, who was married to Christian VII. of Denmark, 
but through his daughter, the Princess Louisa, married 
to Frederick V. of Denmark. Their daughter Louisa 
became the wife of the Landgrave Charles of Hesse- 
Cassel, whose daughter Louisa Caroline married the 
Duke of Glucksberg, by whom) she had Christian, Prince 
of Denmark, the father of the Princess Alexandra.] 

SINGLET : CINGLET. In some parts of York- 
shire (e. g. at Leeds) an underwaistcoat or " Jer- 
sey " is called a " singlet." Is this term the corre 
lative of " doublet," or should it rather be spelt 
" cinglet," and be referred to a classical origin ? 
Is there any authority for the word ? J. B. W. 

[Both Wright and Halliwell, though without citing 
any authority, say " Cinglet : a waistcoat. North" And 
we are disposed on the whole to consider this the proper 
orthography, viewing cinglet as belonging to the same 
family as tingle and surcingle. Cinglet, as a dimunitive, 
may be viewed in connection with the rare Italian word 
cingohtto, diminutive of cingolo. It is also worthy of ob- 
servation that the cingulum was for men, the cingula for 
horses, according to the line cited by Du Cange 

"Cingula sunt hominum, cingula stringit equum." 
Still it is by no means impossible that the word in ques- 
tion, if we may suppose it to have been originally cinglet, 
may have passed in common acceptation into the mean- 
ing of singlet, as opposed to doublet, in accordance with 
our correspondent's suggestion. Of similar transitions, 
our vernacular has many choice specimens.] 

PRIORY or THE HOLY TRINITY. Where can I 
find the fullest account of the Priors of the Holy 
Trinity, Aldermen of London, and of their Manor 
of Braughin in Herts ? INQUIRER. 

[The longest account of the Priory of Christ Church, 
or the Holy Trinity within Aldgate, London, will be 
found in Dugdale's Monasticon Anglicanum, vol. vi. pp. 
150-165, edit. 1830. Consult also Tanner's Notitia Mo- 
nastica, edit. 1787, art. "London ; " Clutterbuck's History 
of Hertfordshire, iii. 149, 150 ; and Maitland's London, 
Index, art. "Trinity."] 



PATEICK RUTHVEX. 
(3 rd S. iii. 3.) 

All interested in the historical problem of the 
Gowrie Conspiracy, and the undeservedly perse- 
cuted Ruthven family, must feel greatly obliged 
to the Noble Lord who enabled MR. A^ILLIAM 
J. THOMS to publish, in " N. & Q." of the 3rd inst., 
the petition from the designated Lord and Lady 
Ruthven to His Highness Oliver, the Lord Pro"- 
tector. 

In this I will, however, venture to remark a 
curious inaccuracy; and will then further ven- 
ture to put some Queries to the readers of 
" N. & Q.," in the hopes of getting Replies to 
them. 

The petitioners are "Patrick, Lord Ruthven, 
and Sarah his wife." The petitioner says in this | 



document, that " he is the grandsonne to John, 
Earle of Gowrey;" and that "the Petitioner's 
Father suffered 19 years' imprisonment in the 
Tower of London, till the late King (Charles I.) 
was pleased to enlarge him with 500 li. per ann. 
out of the Exchequer ; and that in the Parliament 
of Scotland, 1641, H. Majesty restored Mm to the 
Barony of Ruthven." (?) 

The petitioner, Patrick Ruthven, was son of 
the youngest surviving brother of John, third and 
last Earl of Gowrie, slain at his house in Perth 
by James VI., at the so-called Gowrie Con- 
spiracy. The father of the said petitioner, also 
Patrick Ruthven, was confined a prisoner in the 
Tower for nineteen years, as stated, without either 
proof or trial, at the will of the king. He and 
his brother William were children of from four- 
teen to sixteen years of age, living with their 
mother at Dirleton ; when his brothers, the Earl 
of Gowrie and Alexander Ruthven, were slain at 
Perth. The king sent the Earl of Mar to seize 
these innocent children, but they escaped. 

The petitioner, therefore, is not " the Grand- 
sonne," as he calls himself, but nephew to John, 
Earl of Gowrie ; who died unmarried at twenty- 
three years of age. 

The petitioner's grandfather was William, Earl 
of Gowrie (" Old Grey Steel ! "), beheaded at 
Stirling by the said King James VI. of Scotland. 
It is singular that this petitioner should not 
have known who his grandfather was. 

With regard to the restoration of the Barony 
by Charles I., who, with his mother Anne of Den- 
mark, disbelieved in this so-called Conspiracy, 
there is an old Scotch pedigree in the British 
Museum in which a baron's coronet is placed over 
the name of Patrick Ruthven, the petitioner's 
father, with the word "restored" under it. And 
a curious letter, from Gustavus Adolphus, King 
of Sweden, to Charles I., was published in 
"N. & Q."; begging his majesty to restore Pa- 
trick Ruthven, the petitioner's father, to the 
honours of his ancient family ; assigning as one 
reason, that family's relationship to Charles 
himself. 

Can any of your readers or correspondents find 
any notice of this spoken-of restoration of the 
Ruthvens to the Barony as alluded to, in the year 
1641 at Edinburgh ? 

The petitioner to Cromwell administered to his 
father's effects as Patrick, Lord Ruthven, of Scot- 
land. His father, Patrick Ruthven, is named in 
his burial register by the same title of Baron 
Lord Ruthven. And although this is no further 
authenticated, there seems strong presumption 
that something of this kind really took place. | 
The loss of the Scotch archives from Edinburgh, 
sunk in the vessels conveying them to London 
from Scotland in 1745, accounts for many missing 
documents of value. 



3'd S. III. JAX. 1", '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



51 



Another remarkable circumstance in the peti- 
tion of the Ruthvens to Cromwell, when he alludes 
to his father (Patrick) being cast into prison for 
debt, " where he died, leaving the Petitioner and 
another Sonne in very poore and lamentable con- 
dition," is, that the petitioner, although married 
to Sarah his wife, should not when petitioning, in 
forma pauperis, mention having had children. 
Instead of which, he names his brother as equally 
in distress with himself and wife a presumption 
that really he had no children, or he would pro- 
bably have named them as a cause for considera- 
tion. It is probable, therefore, that they had no 
heirs, that they were wretchedly off, and that their 
sister, Lady Vandyke frequently called Lady 
Maria Ruthven was transmitter, as generally 
supposed, of the blood of the Earls of Gowrie 
and of their dormant female honours, viz. the 
Baronies of Ruthven and Dirleton in Scotland. 

AN INQUIRER. 



BISHOPS IN WAITING. 
(3 rd S. ii. 510.) 

I thank your correspondent J. A. PN. for his 
reply admitting that he has not in fact any de- 
clared authority for his statement as to the pre- 
cedence of Colonial Bishops. His present argu- 
ment from analogy may have weight with many 
persons, but I humbly think is not quite so con- 
clusive, as he seems to imagine. 

I do not put the question what ought to be 
the precedence (since it can hardly be supposed 
that there are any sensible persons who for a 
moment entertain the idea alluded to by your 
correspondent, that there is any inferior quality 
in the Colonial Bishops as compared with those 
of the mother country ; as far as the consecrated 
Bishop is concerned, there is no distinction) ; but 
what according to the law is their precedence, 
having no seat in Parliament, nor being eligible 
to a seat ? Upon what ground can they take 
rank above Barons of the Realm, Lords of Parlia- 
ment? 

The cases of the Scotch and Irish Peers have 
no analogy, for they are Peers of Scotland and 
Ireland independently of any election as repre- 
sentatives to sit in Parliament, which is regulated 
and determined by acts of the legislature con- 
sequent on the union of the respective kingdoms, 
which preserve and provide for their precedence. 
The Colonial Bishops can under no circumstances 
sit in the House of Lords as the law stands, and 
their style and appellation of Lord Bishop will 
give no stronger claim to precedence as Barons, 
than the style of Lord Chief Justice^does to the 
Chief Judges of the Courts of Law. 

The precedence given to the Bishops in the 
House of Lords over Barons is as Lords Spiritual 



in Parliament, and declared by the Act 31 Henry 
VIII. 

In regard to the ordinary usage of the Govern- 
ment Officers to which your correspondent refers, 
there is no doubt that they observe, in addressing 
the Colonial Bishops, every due regard to the 
courtesy and usages of society in regard to style. 
Admitting fully that the King, as the Fountain 
of all Honour, can confer style, title, and rank 
as he pleases, nevertheless that must^be conferred 
and declared by some public act or instrument ; 
a mere style in conversation will not confer any 
dignity or precedence over persons who have an 
assigned rank by Letters Patent under the Great 
Seal and Acts of Parliament. 

I am not aware that the style of Lord Bishop 
ever occurs in any patent under the Great Seal ; 
but were it so, it could not be any authority for 
a precedence over Barons ; and however par- 
ticular his Majesty King William IV. may have 
been known to be, as stated by your correspondent, 
it is very certain the so styling the Bishops had 
no reference to precedence, for I have before me 
a copy of his Royal Warrant for Colonial prece- 
dence in the East Indies, wherein the Bishop of 
Calcutta is placed and ranked below the Lord 
Chief Justice. J. R. 



SMITH OF BRACO AND STEWARTS OF BRUGH 
AND OF BURRAY. 

(3 rd S. ii. 274, 316.) 

The name of Smith of Braco appears frequently 
in the Orkney Records during the seventeenth 
century. Patrick Smith was son-in-law of George 
Graham, Bishop of Orkney, and a proprietor of va- 
rious lands scattered over the country. On 10th 
April, 1640, was recorded in Register of Sasines 
for Orkney, Sasine for George Graham, of 
Wyrie, last Episcop. of Orkney, of the lands of 
Skaill, &c., on disposition by Patrick Smith of 
Braco. These lands form a part of the estate of 
Breckness, presently possessed by descendants of 
Bishop Graham, in the female line. Reference as 
to Smith of Braco to Peterkin's Orkney Rentals, 
No. III. ; Documents relative to the Bishoprick of 
Orkney, 1627, et seq. 

The Stewarts of Brugh are descended from 
Robert Stewart, Earl of Orkney, son, by the 
sinister bend, of King James V. of Scotland and 
Euphan, daughter of Lord Elphinston. The first 
was Edward Stewart, of Brugh, an illegitimate 
son of Earl Robert; the second was Robert 
Stewart, and the third was John Stewart. This 
Edward Stewart of Brugh was served heir of 
provision of George Stewart, illegitimate son of 
Robert, Earl of Orkney, his brother, in the Island 
of Enhallow, on February 18, 1634. 

On 29th July, 1639, is recorded, Orkney Sasine 



52 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



III. JAN. 17, '63. 



Record, Sasine of Clet, in Westray, on Disposi- 
tion to Edward Stewart of Brugh, in which are 
mentioned Hew Halcro, elder of that ilk, and 
Jean Stewart his spouse, arid Barbara Halcro, 
their daughter, married to Robert Stewart. 

In June, 1639, appears recorded, Sasine of 
lands on South Ronaldsay to Hew Halcro, of 
Halcro, and Margaret Stewart, his spouse. 

These Halcros I understand to be father and 
son, and Margaret Stewart to have been the 
daughter of Earl Robert, said by Duncan Stewart 
to have been married to Halcro of that ilk, but 
whose Christian name is left blank. A daughter 
Jean is said by him to be married to Lord 
Lindores (p. 104.) 

On 24th July, 1683, is recorded, Sasine for 
Jokn Stewart of Brugh, who was son of Robert, 
who was son of Edward. This Edward was Earl 
Robert's son. 

The Brugh this family took their title from 
was, I think, in South Ronaldsay, not in Sanday, 
where an 18d. land of Brugh belonged to 
Colonel John Stewart of Newark, of the Eday 
branch of the Stewarts, and Brugh in Westray 
in 1653 belonged to Maclellan of Woodwick. In 
fact while writing I notice, 16th March, 1642, 
Sasine of lands in Holm in favour of Robert 
Stewart of Brugh, in South Ronaldsay. 

The present Stewart of Brugh is a minor, and 
the estate still in possession of the family lies 
principally in the Island of Westray. I may 
mention having been told that Sir Walter Scott, 
the great novelist, was a curator or guardian of 
the late James Stewart of Brugh, whence per- 
haps the name of Burgh Westra (pronounced 
Brugh-westra), the house of Magnus Troil, in 
the Pirate, The Troil is the Orkney Traill trans- 
ferred to Zetland along with the name of the 
house. The site of the house is imaginary, but 
supposed in the south-west of Zetland. The rare 
old udaller is said to have many traits of a Sin- 
clair of Quendal, and Minna and Brenda are, if 
not portraits of Zetland maids, fine creations of 
the poet's fancy. 

Brugh and Burray are both derived from the 
Norse ; Brugh or Burgh from Borg vallis rupium 
and Burray, Borgar-ey, the island of Borg, as 
Burgar in Evie, and Broigar in Stenness, Borgar- 
gardr, the yard of Borg. 

The names of the Stewarts of Brugh for the 
present and last century could be obtained from 
the Record of Freeholders, if desired. 

The Stewarts of Burray are a different family. 
They were descended by the mother from Robert 
Duke of Albany, third son of Robert II. An- 
drew, second Lord Evandale, had a daughter 
Barbara espoused, in a second marriage, to 
Roderick Macleod, of the Lewes, whose only 
surviving issue was a daughter, Janet Macleod. 
This Barbara feued Burray in 1566 from the 



Bishop of Orkney. She was succeeded in Burray 
by her nephew, Archibald Stewart, Lord Provost 
of Edinburgh, son of her brother, Sir James 
Stewart of Beith, ancestor of the Earls of Mo- 
ray; and he was succeeded by a nephew, James 
Stewart, son of his brother, Henry Stewart, of 
Buchlivies ; and this James Stewart of Burray 
married his second cousin, Janet Macleod. Of 
this marriage was an only child, a daughter, Bar 
bara, who married William Stewart of Mains, 
brother of Alexander, Earl of Galloway, de 
scended from Sir John Stewart of Bonkyl, killed 
at the battle of Falkirk, 1297, in the war of inde- 
pendence. From this marriage sprang a race of 
cavaliers and loyalists. The oldest son James 
predeceased his father. The second son Henry 
was killed fighting under Montrose at the battle 
of Aldern, 1645. 

A third son, Colonel William Stewart, of Mains 
and Burray, adhered to Charles I. 

A fourth son, his brother and successor, Archi 
bald, was also a steady adherent of the royal 
cause. He was a sharer in the victories and 
misfortunes of the Marquis of Montrose. He 
joined the Duke of Hamilton in his attempt to 
rescue the king, I suppose that terminating 
at Preston in 1648, and was taken prisoner, but 
escaped and joined Montrose in his second expe- 
dition in 1650 ; was made prisoner with him after 
his defeat at Craigchonechon (Rock of Lamenta- 
tion), in Sutherlandshire, and sentenced to death, 
but again escaped and joined King Charles II.'s 
army in the expedition to England in 1651, which 
terminated in the hard-fought battle and defeat 
by Cromwell at Worcester. Here he was taken 
prisoner and detained atj Chelsea College several 
months, suffering great misery, but at length 
escaped. After the Restoration, he was made, in 
1683, Lieutenant -Colonel of the Orkney Militia, 
and created a baronet in 1687. This was a hero 
who created for himself a nobility which ennobled 
the title he received from King James II. 

He was succeeded by a son, Sir Archibald, 
and this second Archibald by a son, Sir James, 
the last of the race. 

Sir James Stewart engaged in the rebellion of 
1745, and on its suppression in 1746 he was taken 
prisoner, hiding and in disguise in a farm-house 
at his residence of the Bu of Burray. He died 
in prison before trial, childless, and the estate of 
Burray passed to the nearest relation, the Earl of 
Galloway, from whom it was purchased by Sir 
Lawrence Dundas, ancestor of the Earl of Zet- 
land, the present possessor. The second Sir 
Archibald had another surviving son, Alexander. 
I have heard, but traditionally only, that he was 
killed fighting under Prince Charles Edward 
Stewart, at the battle of Culloden. 

Sir James Stewart and his brother killed Cap- 
tain James Moodie of Melsetter, in the streets of 



3* S. III. JAN. 17, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



53 



the city of Kirkwall, in 1725. Sir James was an 
hereditary Jacobite, and a violent man, and Cap- 
tain Hoodie was a distinguished officer m the 
Eno-lish navy, who commanded the ship of war 
that conveyed George I. from the Continent to 
England on his accession to the British crown at 
Queen Anne's death. He was Commodore of a 
squadron of English ships of war in the Mediter- 
ranean during the Succession war, and for his 
services on the east coast of Spain was ^ pre- 
sented with a sword, and recommended in an 
autograph letter by the Austrian claimant to 
the Spanish Crown, afterwards Emperor of Ger- 
many, to Queen Anne, when he received an 
honourable augmentation to his arms. As a pic- 
ture of the times, I insert a copy of a Proclama- 
tion, issued by Robert Honyman, Sheriff of 
Orkney, immediately after Captain Moodie's 
slaughter : 

Kirkwall, 26th October, 1725. 

" That Whereas, upon the day and date of these pre- 
sents, within this half-hour or thereby, in company with 
Captain James Moodie of Melsatter, Sen r , and Charles 
Stewart, Steward Clerk, going up the way in order to 
hold a Justice of Peace Court, and coming up the length 
of Bailie ffea's in Kirkwall, about the hour of two in the 
afternoon, Sir James Stewart of Burray, Alexander 
Stewart his brother, coming out of the said Baillie ffea 
his gate, the said Alexander Stewart in my presence, did 
beat with his stick the said Captain James Moodie of 
Melsatter, Sen r ; and he defending himself, grapled to- 
gether, and in their grapling, the said Alexander Stewart 
and Sr. James Stewart pulled out their awords, and Cap- 
tain Moodie's man, griping and keeping Alex r Stewart 
in his arms, where I was aiding to my power to quaill 
their Insolency ; and Immediately S r James Stewart of 
Burray his servant, and Alexander Stewart; his servant, 
called Oliver Irving, Returned with Cock't pistolls, which 
savoured of a murderous and assassinating design, ffired 
two pistolls, one whereof lighted upon Capt. Moodie, and 
shott him through the arm, whither through his body, as 
mortall I cannot as yet tell ; the doctor being presently 
with him, arid the oy r shott lighted on my third son 
Peter, and cutt the Kim of his Belly ; One of the Balls 
lighting likeways in Captain Moodie's Servant's arm, 
who was holding Alex r S'tewart in conjunction with me; 
and I having no force by me, nor any premeditat thought 
of such an horid action; having only both our servants, 
both my sons, and the Steward Clerk with me. And 
thereafter the said S 1 ' James Stewart and Alexander 
Stewart his brother, with their swords drawn, did carrie 
of and convey their servants out of the town. Whether 
they had horses or not prepared for the purpose I cannot 
tell. And thereafter they cam down through the town 
with their swords drawn, where I advised them to put up 
their swords, holding forth the barbarity of such an 
action. And in Respect the same is committed within 
the Burgh of Kirkwall, I hereby address myself to the 
Honourable Magistrates thereof, that they may secure 
the persons of the said S r James Stewart and Alexander 
Stewart, his Brother, untill they stand Tryall. Sic sub- 
scribitur, Ro. HONTMANE." 

Sir James Stewart was made prisoner in 1746 
by Captain Benjamin Moodie of the English 
army, son of the man slain by him. The Stewarts 
of Burray in county politics headed an opposition 



to the Earls of Morton, the proprietors of the 
estates of the old Orkney Earldom, of which a 
redeemable grant had been made by King Charles 
I., dated at Oxford, June 1643, to William Earl 
of Morton, in security of an advance of 30,000/. 
sterling, and the influence of the Morton family 
returned the Member of Parliament for the county. 
In 1733, the ,Earl of Morton, when crossing in a 
boat the sound of Holmsound between the island 
of Burray and the parish of Holm, in the Main- 
land, was pursued by Sir James Stewart, and one 
of the Earl's party, Mr. John Kiddoch, Sheriff 
Clerk of Orkney, was wounded by a musket-ball 
fired from Sir James's boat. With the fine im- 
posed for this outrage, on Sir James by the Jus- 
ticiary Court of Scotland to be paid the Earl of 
Morton and presented by the Earl to the magis- 
trates of Kirkwall, the present Town Hall was 
built. I do not know what was done after Cap- 
tain Moodie's slaughter. 

Another picture of these rude times in the 
north is afforded by some proceedings, connected 
with a lady, the wife successively of Bellenden of 
Stenness, and Captain James Moodie of Melsetter, 
and mother of the proprietors of both estates, 
which she managed during their minority. Mrs. 
Christian Crawford was of the family of the Craw- 
fords of Kerse in Ayrshire, a woman of a bold 
and masculine spirit ; and several characteristic 
stories of her are handed down. On one occasion 
in 1731, while living at Aikerness in Evie, the 
seat of the Bellendens a family descended from 
Sir Patrick Bellenden, one of David Rizzio's 
murderers having taken some offence at Mr. 
Hugh Mowat, the minister of the parish of Evie, 
she so frightened him that he left his charge. A 
ruffian-like Highlander presented himself in the 
parish kirk of Evie on a Sunday when Mr. 
Mowat was preaching, and seated himself imme- 
diately opposite the pulpit. With eyes sternly 
fixed on the preacher, he kept handling a dirk in 
his breast in a threatening manner, so as to at- 
tract Mr. Mowat's notice. The minister, alarmed, 
made inquiries, and on being told that this was a 
person who had been obliged to fly Sutherland- 
shire for a murder he had committed there, and 
was now living under the protection of Mrs. 
Christian Crawford (Lady Melsetter, in her second 
widowhood), he wrote to the sheriff-substitute ; 
the sheriff wrote several letters to this lady, 
couched at first with great civility, cautioning 
her that the General Assembly of the Church of 
Scotland would not allow a minister to be driven 
out of his parish, and growing in strength as his 
letters were fruitless. The result was, that Mr. 
Mowat left his parish and took out a law-burrows 
against the lady a Scottish half-criminal pro- 
ceeding, in which an individual makes a complaint 
on oath to a magistrate that he is apprehensive 
of violence and injury from another, whom he 



54 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'* S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



requires to furnish security for his good behaviour. 
James Traill the younger, of Sebay, became the 
lady's security, and it is to be hoped the minister 
returned to his parish. On another occasion the 
minister of Hoy, situated in the same island, and 
adjoining to the parish of Waas, in which the estate 
of Melsettar lies, cut peats for his winter fuel, 
in a peat moss as I suppose beyond the boun- 
dary between the parishes, and belonging to Waas. 
Mrs. Christian Crawford sent some boats manned 
by armed crews of the Melsetter tenantry, who 
destroyed the peats, leaving him to complain to 
his presbytery, and in the records of the Cairston 
presbytery, about 1734, this story is told. 

Refer to Peterkin's Rentals of Orkney ; A Short 
Historical Account of the Royal family of Scotland 
and of the Surname of Stewart, by Duncan 
Stewart, M.A., Edinb. 1739, pp. 104, 119, 127; 
and information as to the Stewarts and other 
Orkney families is to be found in two Books of 
Eecords of Orkney Sasines, extending from about 
1639 to 1689, found lately in Kirkwall, and trans- 
mitted to the General Register House, Edinburgh. 

W. H. F. 
Kirkwall. 



CHIEF BARON JAMES REYNOLDS: BARON 
JAMES REYNOLDS. 

(2 nd S. xi. 489 ; 3 rd S. i. 149, 235, 276.) 

The following extracts are from a MS. copy of 
a book in the handwriting of Mrs. Sheppard 
Frere *, of Roydon Hall, in Norfolk. 

The original copy was amongst the papers of 
the late George Frere, Esq., of Lincoln's Inn. 

The contents of the book are, a Prayer of the 
Chief Baron Reynolds, and copies of two letters. 

The first letter is thus endorsed : " This book 
my great-grandfather (James Reynolds) wrote 
for his son, my grandfather (Capt n Robert Rey- 
nolds, half-brother to the Chief-Baron), June l t , 
1683;" and the other, dated Oct. 2, 1690:- 

This book, my great-grandfather's (James Rey- 
nolds) second wife (B. Parker), wrote for their 
son, the Lord Chief Baron Reynolds (their only 
child, born 1686)." 

Mr. Reynolds's letter is full of excellent advice 
and reflections on spiritual and secular affairs ; 
the other contains a description of several mem- 
bers of the Reynolds family. 

It appears from this that Judith, the daughter 
of Sir William Hervey, of Ickwortb, was not the 
Chief-Baron's grandmother, as supposed by MB. 
Foss, but his father's first wife. 

Mr - James Reynolds (the Chief- Baron's father) 

* This lady was Susanna, daughter of John Hatley, of 
London and Kirby Hall, in Essex, and Isabella, his wife, 
daughter of Robert and Keziah Reynolds, of Bumpstead 
Hehons, in the same county. 



was born April 28th, 1633, at Merton, in Nor- 
folk, the house of his mother's father, Sir William 
De Grey; but brought up at Bumpstead Helions, 
the house of his father, James Reynolds, the eldest 
son of Sir James Reynolds, of Castle Camps, in 
Cambridgeshire, " who was a gentleman of great 
repute in that county, and lived very hospitably." 

This Sir James Reynolds had by his first wife 
(an heiress of the Milbourne family, of Essex), 
three sons James Reynolds, the Chief Baron's 
grandfather ; Sir Robert Reynolds, his second 
son ; and Thomas Reynolds, his third son, who 
was brought up a divine ; and one daughter, 
married to Sir Selwin Parker, of Sussex. By 
his second wife, who was a daughter of Sir Robert 
Mordent or Mordaunt, he had, Sir John Reynolds, 
a celebrated General in the Parliamentary army, 
of whom an account is given in the second volume 
of Noble's Memoirs of the House of Cromwell, 
(1787), and a daughter, married to Mr. Calthorp,* 
of Ampton, in Suffolk, and afterwards to Sir Al- 
gernon May. 

The latter part of Mrs. Reynolds's letter is 
devoted to a description of her husband's cha- 
racter and education ; his first marriage with 
Judith, daughter of Sir William Hervey, a lady 
twenty years older than himself ; his sons by that 
marriage ; the death of his wife ; the conduct of 
certain rich widows who tried to entrap him ; his 
marriage to B. Parker, at Gray's Inn Chapel on ! 
the 29th of June, 1682; their residence at Bump- i 
stead Helions, at the following Michaelmas ; his J 
dislike of the place, and removal to London, in 
November 1685, where the Chief Baron was born, 
at'the house of his mother's Aunt Gibbs, in Clerk- 
enwell, on January 6th, 1686 ; their return to 
Bumpstead, in the following March, for four 
years, and removal to Bury St. Edmund's, where 
Mr. Reynolds died on Easter day, 1690, and his 
body carried to Castle Camps, to' be buried in the 
grave of his grandfather and father. 

The arms at the bottom of the prints of 
two judges (see " N. & Q." 3 rd S. i. 235) cor- 
respond exactly f, except that the Chief Baron's 
have a crescent for difference. 

Any further information will gladly be for- 
warded privately to MR. Foss. HERDS FRATER. 



SIR ROGER DE COVERLEY. 

(3 rd S. ii. 495.) 

Whether Addison merely intended the charac- 
ter of Sir Roger de Coverley as the model of the 
kind benevolent country gentleman of his day, or 
whether he had in his mind's eye any particular 



* Stated also in Blomefield's Norfolk, 8vo, ix. 217. 
t Az. a chevron erm. between 3 crosses-croslet fitche'e 
arg. 






3' S. III. JAN. 17, '63.] ' 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



55 



individual, it would perhaps be now difficult to 
decide. The probabilities, however, are in favour 
of the latter idea : since the widow has long been 
recognised by family tradition in the person of 
Mrs. Catherine Boevey of Flaxley Abbey, Glou- 
cestershire, daughter of John Riches, Esq., of 
London, and widow of William Boevey, Esq., Lord 
of the Manor of Flaxley, to whom she was mar- 
ried at the age of fifteen ; becoming a widow at 
twenty-two, she continued so to the end of her 
life, notwithstanding the persevering addresses of 
numerous suitors among the neighbouring country 
gentlemen. Her learning, charity, and feminine 
graces, procured her a monument both at Flaxley 
and Westminster Abbey. Among other good 
deeds it is suggested, that she was one of the 
earliest founders of Sunday Schools for the chil- 
dren of the poor. 

So also it is probable that Addison had some 
country gentleman of ancient standing and dis- 
tinguished benevolence before him as his type, 
although it seems that his model is not as clearly 
traceable in this instance as in that of the widow. 
I do not, however, agree with your correspondent 
J. G. N., that the name of Coverley was suggested 
by the tune. If he will turn to the Spectator 
(vol. i. No. 2), he will see that Sir Roger is pre- 
sumed to be great-grandson of the " inventor of 
that famous country dance which is called after 
him." So that Addison clearly recognises the 
antiquity of the dance, and suggests that the dance 
was called from the family, and not the family from 
the dance. Sir Roger is said to be a gentleman 
from Worcestershire, and the widow to live in an 
adjoining county ; probably pointing to Flaxley in 
the adjoining county of Gloucester. 

Whether Addison had in his mind's eye a mem- 
ber of the families of Berkeley or Brydges, con- 
nected by descent with Roger de Berkeley de 
Coberley, co. Gloucester, temp. Will. I., I leave to 
those who know more of the characteristics of the 
individual members of those families than I do, 
to decide. If by Coverley, as is suggested by your 
other correspondent ME. M. A. LOWER, be meant 
Cubberley in Gloucestershire, then some descen- 
dant of Sir Roger de Berkeley de Coberley may 
be intended ; though his direct male descent ter- 
minated in 1404, when the estate passed by mar- 
riage of Alice de Berkeley, the heiress, to the 
family of Brydges ; both were also connected by 
property with Worcestershire. 

But there is no reason to suppose that the 
parish of Cubberley was ever written Coverley. 
It has been spelt at various periods Culberlege, 
Cubberley, Coberley, Cobberley, Coberleie, Cub- 
berly, and Cowberley : the latter of which Leland 
fancifully derives from Cow-Berkeley, as though 
it were the cow-pastures of the Berkeley family ; 
and this etymon of the learned old antiquary may 
not have been quite so fanciful as some latter 



historians have supposed it ; for the manor had 
been in more ancient times called Pinswell, or 
Turpindswell, or Trepenswell. But it has never 
been called Coverley. The nearest approach to 
the latter name, among the Gloucestershire vil- 
lages in ancient times, is Covele, or Couelege 
(now Coaley), near Berkeley, still part of the 
Berkeley estates. Richard de Coueley held lands 
in this parish temp. Hen. II., and John de Coue- 
ley, 18 Edw. II. It continued in that family 
down to 7 Hen. V., when the estate passed to 
daughters. SAMUEL LTSONS. 



BYRON'S PLAGIARISMS. 
(3 rd S. ii. 465.) 

Byron, I have seen it stated somewhere, had an 
ugly tendency to plagiarising from books whose 
obscurity offered but a remote chance of the lar- 
ceny being detected. I remember one instance 
where he steals an idea from Donne's Satires, 
versified by Pope. In Satire iv. occur the 
lines : 

" Thus, others' talents having nicely shown, 
He came by sure transition to his own : 
Till I cried out, ' You prove yourself so able, 
Pity you was not Druggerman at Babel ; 
For, had they found a linguist half so good, 
I make no question but the tower had stood.' " 

And in a letter to one of his friends (I cannot 
recall to whom this letter was addressed, when it 
was written, or where I met with it, but I think 
it was in Russell's Life of Mezzofanti), speaking of 
Mezzofanti the great linguist, Byron uses some 
such phrase as this : " He is a walking Briareus ; 
and had he been at Babel, might have acted as 
interpreter there." I am not certain whether he 
made use of the word " dragoman " or " inter- 
preter," but the idea is the same in either case. 

This is a small thing compared to the next 
example I shall give of this thieving proclivity. 
I do not know if the originality of that sublime 
address to the ocean, which occurs in Childe 
Harold (canto iv.), has been before questioned ; 
if not, I regret that the suum cuigue rule obliges 
me to claim the glory for Madame de Stael, from 
whose Corinne the ideas have been undoubtedly 
stolen, as any candid person will admit after com- 
paring the two passages. That from Byron is the 
well known 

" Unchangeable, save to thy wild wave's play, 
Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow, 
Such as Creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now." 

Stanza clxxxii. 

Also, Stanza clxxix. : 

" Ten thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain ; 
Man marks the earth with ruin his control 
Stops on the shore ; upon thy watery plain 
The wrecks are all thy deeds, nor doth remain 
A shadow of man's ravage." 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



Compare with this the following paragraph from 
Corinne, ou TItalie, liv. i. ch. 4. : 

"... mais quand on s'arrete sous le portique du tem- 
ple, on aime h rapprocher le plus pur des sentiments de 
1'ame, la religion, avec le spectacle de cette superbe mer, 
sur laquelle I'homme jamais ne pent imprimer sa trace. La 
terre est travaille'e par lui, les montagnes sont couples 
par ses routes, les rivieres se resserrent en canaux, pour 
porter ses marcbandises ; mais si les vaisseaux sillonnent 
un moment les ondes, la vague vient effacer aussitot cette 
legere marque de servitude, et la mer reparait telle qu'elle 
fut au premier jour de la creation" 

Be it remembered that Corinne was published 
ten years before the concluding canto of Childe 
Harold, and also that it continued always to be a 
favourite book with Lord Byron. Taking this 
into consideration, it seems that the similarity 
existing between the passages must be ascribed to 
plagiarism ex parte Byron ; perhaps I might say 
that, whilst composing the two stanzas transcribed 
above, he had before his mind the paragraph from 
Corinne. I have marked in italics those parts 
of each which bear the clearest resemblance, and 
to me at least, the couplet 

" Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow, 
Such as Creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now," 

appears but a splendid paraphrase of the words, 
"mais si les vaisseaux," &c. PETER CULKIN. 



THE SYRIAC VERSION OF THE APOCALYPSE. 

(3 rd S. ii. 296, 511.) 

^ A new question having been opened, I am en- 
titled to a reply, which I should have anticipated 
had I been aware that B. H. C. doubted the fact, 
that the Apocalypse was contained in the Philo- 
xenian version. I quoted from Bagster's Polyglot, 
which was advertised to admit the Apocalypse 
from the PhiloxenSan version, and which was pub- 
lished under the revision of Professor Lee, the 
editor of the Bible Society's edition of the Syriac, 
with the same text of the Revelation (Seller's 
Hermeneutics, p. 146, Wright). Hug, in his In- 
troduction to the New Testament (s. 70), says the 
Philoxenian version "contains the whole New 
Testament." Dr. Bialloblotzky, the most recent 
authority (Dictionary of the Bible), says that 
"L. de Dieu subsequently [to 1559] published 
the Apocalypse from an ancient MS., formerly in 
the library of the younger Scaliger, and after- 
wards in that of the University of Ley den, con- 
taining part of the Philoxenian or younger ver- 
sion" (Lugd. Bat., 1627, 4to); which statement 
is confirmed by Hug (s. 64, p. 347, Wait). The 
silence of De Dieu in his Preface, or of Lee in his 
Prolegomena, does not abrogate the fact, that 
both published the Apocalypse from the Phi- 
loxenian^ indeed, there was no other source for 
it. Louis de Dieu is not entirely silent, for in his 



title-page he says his Apocalypse is taken " ex 
manuscripto exemplari e Bibliothecti clariss. Viri 
Josephi Scaligeri," and a reference to the MS. at 
Leyden identifies it as Philoxenian. Many diffi- 
culties surround the Syriac student, arising from 
the ignorance of the early critics, the cant of 
criticism of some of the moderns, the mass of un- 
explored MSS., and the want of persons of ade- 
quate learning, integrity, and means for their 
collation. Lee has not escaped animadversion, 
and even Gutbir foisted 1 John v. 7 into his 
Syriac text. I have not access to Adler ; but the 
quotation from him that " the Apocalypse does 
not own Philoxenus as its author," of ivhich there 
can be no doubt, implies that Philoxenus translated 
some or the rest of the New Testament ; but such 
is not the case. Philoxenus was the bishop who 
patronised this translation of Polycarp, his chore- 
piscopus. Bialloblotzky is also wrong in attribut- 
ing this translation to " Thomas of Harclea " 
(Charkel) ; this person, who is the same as " Tho- 
mas the Pauper " (and not another, as Asseman 
supposes), merely revised the translation of Pol 
carp by comparing it with two MSS. (Eichhorn' 
Repertorium, vii. 245). This Thomas, afterw 
Bishop of Marash, is possibly the author of 
inferior versions of the Apocalypse and four 
neral Epistles, neither belonging to the Peshito 
nor Philoxenian (Conf. Hug, s. 64). I would re- 
mark, in passing, that the number 666 (Rev. xi. 
18) is represented by Irenaeus (Proleg. v. 30, 1), 
on the authority of St. John himself, to have been 
the name Aareivos (meaning the sixth Roman Em- 
peror, Nero, who was born in Latium), not Aecmi>os r 
as B. H. C. found it. The characters undecy- 
phered were probably numerals. Dean Alford does 
not follow Tregelles and Liicke, but he admits 
that the Apocalypse is in the Pbiloxenian (s. 14). 
Lucke thinks that the Apocalypse was received 
into the canon after the publication of the Peshito 
(Alford, s. 16). Perhaps B. H. C. refers to an 
Apocalypse that appears after some editions of 
the Peshito, which, says Hug (s. 64), " is certainly 
no part of it, if one may judge from its quality," 
but which may have originated from the Phi- 
loxenian version. I will meet the very novel 
statement of B. H. C., that this " version " (of the 
Apocalypse) " is not very ancient," by referring 
him to Thiersch, Walton, Wichelhause, Hengsten 
berg, and Liicke, but especially to the argument! 
of Hug (s. 65), in proof of its existence at an earl] 
period, in the Peshito itself. The mere absence o 
books in MS. or print is no evidence of uncanoni- 
cality. The Scriptures in constant use now b] 
the Jews contain little more than the books o 
Moses, and there is no wonder that the Syrians 
who were poor, whilst MSS. were costly, shoul< 
confine themselves very much to the publication 
of the four Gospels only. Protestants issue more 
copies of the New than of the Old Testament 



3^ s. III. JAN. 17, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



57 



ilthough both are cheap. But neither Jews, Sy- 
ians, nor Protestants thereby intend to repudiate 
;heir other books as uncanonical. 

T. J. BUCKTON. 

Lichfield. 



ROMAN COINS FOUND IN MALABAR (3 rd S. ii. 
506.) A friend has just called my attention to a 
Query in " N. & Q." with respect to the name 
of the river in Malabar in the bed of which 
numerous Roman gold coins were found some 
j^ears ago. 

Your querist will find an account of the dis- 
covery in the 20th vol. of the Asiatic Journal of 
Bengal for May, 1851, p. 369, and he may see 
some of the coins in the Indian Museum Fife 
House, Scotland Yard, which at my request 
General Cullen, the resident at the Court of 
Travancore, was good enough to present to the 
East India Company. 

The name of the river in the bed of which 
the coins were found is Vaniencudavoo, in the 
Cotiacum Talook or district, and the spot about 
twenty-four miles from Tellicherry. The date 
1850. Roman gold coins have also been found 
in the Deccan, the southern Mahratta country, 
Cuddapah, Nellore, Madura, and in various places 
in Southern India. W. H. SYKES. 

DEFLECTION or CHANCELS (3 rd S. i. 154.) In 
Chester Cathedral I was struck with an irregu- 
larity somewhat akin to this. This axis of the 
nave and that of the choir were not continuous, 
but appeared to be parallel, that of the former 
being, I should say, about nine inches to the north 
of the latter. This irregularity is apparent on 
looking at the eastern piers supporting the central 
tower, and is equally so whether looking from the 
choir or from the nave. Is it capable of explana- 
tion ? S. SAN. 

Natal, South Africa. 

SWINET BEQUESTS (3 rd S. ii. 508.) The first, 
" for the best published work on Jurisprudence," 
was awarded, in January, 1849, to Dr. Paris, Pre- 
sident of the Royal College of Physicians, and 
J. S. M. Fonblanque, Esq., Barrister at Law, for 
their joint work on Medical Jurisprudence, pub- 
lished in 3 vols., in 1823. The position of Dr. 
Paris, and the time that elapsed between the pub- 
lication of the book and the award of the prize, 
led to a charge thus keenly expressed : 

"It is not long since a College which has been the 
loudest in its demands for exclusive privileges, had con- 
lided to it the bestowal of a large sum of )noney, as a j 
reward for distinction in a field of literature, cultivated | 
by authors of the highest eminence, and yet, incredible i 
as it may seem, the president, without any claim except I 
he joint authorship of an old nearly forgotten publica- 
tion, appropriated the prize to himseff&nd. the lawyer who 
was his partner in the work." 



To this charge Dr. Paris replied, 
" I meet it with a flat denial. A sum of money, to the 
amount of 5000Z., was left to the Society of Arts, upon 
condition that once in every five years that Society should, 
in conjunction with Fellows of the College of Physicians, 
present to the author of a published work on the subject 
of jurisprudence, a silver vase, of the value of one hundred 
pounds, containing a purse of the same value. I am not, 
nor ever was, a Member of the Society of Arts. The whole 
matter was settled by the Society of Arts, and three Fel- 
lows of the College of Physicians (all College Officers) in 
a committee held at the room of the former Society, over 
the proceedings and decision of which committee I had 
no control, either directly or indirectly." 

Of the book for which the prize was adjudged, 
it might have been said then, as it may be said 
with truth even now, that it is the most compre- 
hensive English work on the subject ; and that, 
though some parts of it are superseded, many 
other parts are not, for they contain much me- 
dical, legal, and historical information which it 
would be very difficult to find elsewhere, and the 
comments of Dr. Paris himself are always worthy 
of attention. He was a highly accomplished and 
skilful physician, but he never obtained the popu- 
larity that he deserved. J' A physician in a great 
city," says Dr. Johnson, in his Life of Akenside, 
" seems to be the mere plaything of fortune." 

" CZARINA," " CZAKINE" (1 st S. viii. 226; 3 rd S. 
iii. 6.) There is no doubt that Tsaritsa is the 
title of the Tsar's wife in Russian ; but this is not 
the title by which she is known in Europe gene- 
rally. In Italian her title is written Czarina, so 
in French, as well as Czarine; in English it is the 
same as in Italian. In German it was written 
Czarinn, till within the present century, and is 
now written Zarinn, without the initial c. The 
termination ina in Russian is an augmentative 
(that is, the opposite to the diminutive termi- 
nation), but does not occur here. It seems that 
each nation, ignorant of, or rejecting Tsaritsa, 
added a feminine termination to czar. How the 
sound ts came to be represented by cz is not so 
easy to determine. In all the Slavonian languages 
aaving a separate alphabet, there is a special cha- 
racter for ts; but such as use the Roman alphabet 
sometimes represent this sound by c, as the Polish, 
Wendish, and Bohemian, and sometimes by cz, as 
;he Hungarian, probably from the analogy of the 
Grermans, who give this sound to c and z seve- 
rally, whilst the Slovack (Slavonian proper), 
~ roatian, and Dalmatian occasionally, use both c 
and cz for ts. (Ballhorn's Alphabete, p. 62.) The 
)robable course of the form Czar and its com- 
pounds is from the three last-mentioned lan- 
guages, and especially from the Hungarian, in their 
use "in writing, as in parliamentary debating, of 
the Latin tongue, and through the Romish church 
and Italy, to France, Germany, and England. 
Tzaritsa or Czarina, however, may be said to be 



58 



NOTES AND QUEKIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



extinct, as the Russian sovereign has been advanced 
from Grand Duke and Tsar to be an Emperor, the 
highest title known ; and the wife's title corre 
sponds. The title of Grand Duke lasted from 
about 850 to 1505, when Basil IV., son of Ivan III., 
took the title of Tsar, which continued till Oct. 22, 
1721, when the Senate conferred on Peter the 
titles of Great, Father of his Country, and Em- 
peror of all the Russias. (Koch, ii. 151, 272.) Koch 
has set the example in French of writing Tzar, 
and Tsar, but the latter is the more correct. 

T. J. BUCKTON. 
Lichfield. 

SIR LEONARD DE SANDERSTED (3 rd S. ii. 469.) 
The family of Sanders was seated at Sandersted 
at or before the Conquest until 18 Hen. III., 
when Richard, son of Leonard de Sandersted, 
alienated the family property. The chief branch 
settled at Caldwell, co. Derby, one of whom was 
a zealous officer under Cromwell. The second 
branch were seated at Branston, and the third at 
Barton, in the county of Stafford. The arms of 
this family (sa. a chev. erm. betw. 3 bulls' heads 
cabossed arg.), are represented in Plot's Map of 
Staffordshire. See also Burke's Armory, and 
Shaw's Staffordshire. H. S. G. 

MONUMENTS IN JAMAICA (3 rd S. iii. 17.) 
1. 1683, ob. set. 63. " Colonel Theodore Gary, one 
of the sons of Cockington House, Devonshire ; 
brother to Sir Henry Cary, a judge." 2. "Mr. 
Gary Helyar," ob. 1672, at. 39. (MS. Coll. Brit. 
Museum). SPAL. 

*'' LlBERAVI ANIMAM MEAM*' (2 nd S. viil. 108, 157, 

406, 433.) Let me add one more example from 
1 Maccabees, ix. 9: "Et avertebant eum, di- 
centes, Non poterimus, sed liberemus animas nos- 
tras modo, et revertamur ad fratres nostros ;" 
which our English version translates, "Let us 
now rather save our lives." A 5. 

REPRODUCTION OP OLD WITTICISMS (3 rd S. ii 
19.) The old riddle-" Why is it preferable to 
marry a short woman rather than a tall one ?" 
may be traced back a very long way. For Cor- 
nelius a Lapide, in his commentary on Numbers 
v. 14, says : 

" Democritus, cum esset procerus, rogatus, cur tarn 
parvam duxisset uxorem? Ego, inquit, in raalo eli- 
gendo, quod minimum erat elegi. Idem respondit b 
Thomas Morns." 

AS. 

REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF NANTES (3 rd S. 
ii. 308, 339 ; iii. 15.) In continuation of MR. J. 
S. BURN'S list, may be added : 

" Tableau Historique et Statistique de 1'E'tablissement 
Keformes & Fridericia en Jutland. Par Jean-Marc 
Dalgas, leur Pasteur. Kopenhague, 1797." 

This colony of Fridericia, or Frederitse, was a 
branch from the Brandenburg colony. Thirty 
families emigrated in 1719-20 to Fridericia, about 



two-thirds of their number stayed in that town ; 
and Frederick IV., of Denmark, granted them 
certain privileges by decree, dated Nov. 15, 1720. 
Dalgas remarks that, from the eighteen or twenty 
families of which the colony consisted in 1720, 
there had sprung 112 families existing (in 1797) 
in Denmark, and bearing nineteen different names. 
The names are all given. For example, there 
were eighteen families named Honore, comprising 
ninety persons ; fourteen families, or sixty-five 
persons, named Dupont. The total number of 
persons was 550, including ten of the pastor's own 
family. He himself was of Swiss extraction. The 
increase of the colony would not have been so large 
but for the special circumstance that the marriages, 
between 1720 and 1797 were strictly between 
members of the families comprised in the colony. 
Query, Does this colony still flourish ? And if 
so, of how many families and souls does it 
consist ? FRED. HENDRIKS. 

OGIER THE DANE (2 nd S. xii. 363, 446.) 
M. Capefigue is not a careful writer ; but I did 
not suppose that he would have repeated the ex- 
ploded notion that Ogier was a Scandinavian : 

" Expliquons d'abord le nom de Danois donne a un 
heros de Cycle carlovingien et qui semble rattacher nos 
legendes nationales & la Scandinavie. II n'en estrien; 
notre Danois prdtendu est un Ardennais. Dane (foret), 
are-dane, par 1'adjonction de 1'article, en formant Dane- 
marche ou frontiere de 1'Ardenne, a donne lieu a, cette 
confusion que la critique moderne a dissipe'e. Nous te* 
nons^ done Ogier pour un guerrier de race Germanique, 
tantot compagnon, tantot adversaire de Charlemagne." 
Geruzez., torn. i. p. 49. 

E. N. H. 

ENGLISH COINS WITH PROFILE (3 rd S. ii. 518.) 
Perhaps MR. MATTHEWS will put on record a 
description with the legend on the groat he men- 
tions ; and will also state the grounds upon which 
he attributes it to Henry VI. No such coin, I 
believe, is known to collectors. 

JOSEPH Rix, M.D. 

St. Neot's. 

CALLIS (3 rd S. ii. 213.) I am unable at present 
to refer to the Query in the First Series, but it 
seems to me very probable that callies women or 
persons were people of the Edie Ochiltree stamp, 
privileged by local or other authority to pass 
freely along the " calles," or highways and by- 
ways, without being taken up as vagabonds. Or 
the term " callis-house" might originally, and in 
the first instance, have been applied to such 
houses of refuge as that in Rochester ; which took 
in the poor from the road, and gave them a night's 
food and lodging. I have purposely given the 
general signification of highways and by-ways to 
"callis," because, according to Du Cange's ex- 
amples, it must have been used for ways generally. 
He gives two English examples of its use in deeds 
" pro via regia ;" whilst it is used for a by-path 



3* d S. III. JAN. IT, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



59 



(" calles devios," Vulg.) in Judges v. 6, or for 
"via trita pecorum vestigiis" (Gloss.), as quoted 
by Du Cange ; or, as Acharisio expresses it, " a 
narrow way not public." Cannot STAMFORDI- 
ENSIS kindly examine the deed under which his 
bedehouse was founded ? BENJ. EAST. 

EXTRAORDINARY CHRISTMAS CAROL (3 rd S. iii. 
6.) The following version of the Carol referred 
to by your correspondent is popular in Worces- 
tershire : 

"As I sat on a sunny bank 
On Christmas day in the morning, 
I saw three ships come sailing by 
On Christmas day in the morning. 
And who do you think were in those ships 
But Joseph and his fair lady; 
He did whistle and she did sing 1 , 
And all the bells on earth did ring 
For Joy our Saviour he was born 
On Christmas day in the morning." 

There may be more of it for aught I know. 
Perhaps PROF. DE MORGAN can explain how it 
was mathematically possible for three ships to 
contain two persons. H. S. G. 

EARLY MEZZOTINT (2 nd S. x. 369.) I think the 
lady is Electra, and that "A" stands for Aga- 
memnon. The modern costume and the viola- 
tions of local colour will not surprise any one who 
is moderately familiar with the works of Dutch 
artists. 

OtfJ.01 TOV KaTa^dlfJ-ffOV, 

Tov re foVros a.\d.Ta, 
"Os TTOV yav &\\av 

MeAeoy, 
Uorl 6i]ffarau 

Toy K\SLVOV iraTpbs K(f>vs, 
Aura 8' ev ")(4pvi)ffi SO/JLOIS 
Ncuw 



Ovpdas av 
Euripidis Electra, vv. 201210. 

H. B. C. 

U. U. Club. 

ROOD COAT (3 rd S. ii. 491.) This word I ap- 
prehend to be rood cot, having nothing to do 
with covering the Cross on Passion Sunday, as 
F. C. H. supposes, the cot being the recess in 
which the Crucifix often stood inclosed, though 
exposed. In this quarter we have the term "bell 
cot," a bell turret, or more particularly a slighter 
affair or bell gable, in which one or two bells are 
seen to hang, as in many of our Norman or Early 
English churches in country places. " Sancte 
cot" likewise occurs, a small arch or recess finished 
gable-wise, and cross-crowned or finialed, which, 
in numerous examples, rises from the roof of the 
church eastward, for the former purpose of con- 
taining the Sacring or Saints' bell, which was rung 
at the elevation of the Host. Cot may here be 



quoted in its further or popular sense of a shed, a 
protection, or a fold, for we have " sheep-cot," 
" hen-cot," " pig-cot," " dove-cot," as farm-yard 
terms, all of which are of self- explanation. G. 

Whitby. 

RIGHT OF CREATING BARONETS (3 rd S. iii. 27.) 
The first Earl of Stirling had not the power of 
creating Baronets by his charter ; and, indeed, the 
Crown cannot delegate the prerogative of creating 
a hereditary dignity. He had, as appears by the 
charter, only the power of proposing or nominat- 
ing to the Crown persons to be by the Crown 
created Baronets. The late claimant of the earl- 
dom was an impostor, and was convicted of forging 
some document to make out his claim. G. B. 

Temple. 

THE CANONS OF 1640 (3 rd S. iii. 25.) These 
Constitutions and Canons Ecclesiastical were first 
printed in 1640. They were afterwards reprinted 
in the various editions of Sparrow's Collection of 
Articles, Injunctions, Canons, Orders, Ordinances^ 
and Constitutions Ecclesiastical. They are also to 
be found in Cardwell's Synodalia, vol. i. p. 380. 

G. W. N. 

TAKING TIME BY THE FORELOCK (3 rd S. iii. 28.) 
This proverb is given in Bohn's Handbook of 
Proverbs, edit. 1855, p. 494, but no reference at 
all to its origin. It is to be found in Spenser's 
Sonnets, p. 156, Aldine edition, vol. v. 

" Goe to my Love, where she is carelesse layd, 
Yet in her winter's bowre not well awake ; 
Tell her the joyous time wil not be staid, 
Unless she doe him by the forelocke take." 

G. W. N. 

MAYORS : WORSHIPFUL OR RIGHT WORSHIPFUL 
(3 rd S. ii. 492.) I doubt whether there is any 
authoritative rule upon this subject. I have seen 
it stated, in some treatise on official addresses, &c., 
that mayors of cities are styled " the Right Wor- 
shipful," and those of towns "the Worshipful." 
In a work called the Secretary's Guide, 5th ed., 
1831, the author, at p. 95, asserts, that "the 
Mayors of all Corporations, with the Sheriffs, Al- 
dermen, and Recorder of London, are styled Right 
Worshipful ; and the Aldermen and Recorders of 
other Corporations, and Justices of the Peace, 
Worshipful." Mr. Wardell, in his Municipal 
History of Leeds, 1846, pp. 4, 5, has, I observe, 
adopted this latter rule in treating of the various 
authorities of that borough. The Aldermen of 
London, who have passed the chair, are styled 
Right Worshipful, and those below the chair 
Worshipful. Ancient usage, or custom, is pro- 
bably the only authority, if such it can be called, 
but even that is not always to be depended upon, 
as, in some instances, I have seen both the above 
prefixes used. C. J. 



60 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3"i S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



PAMMENT BRICK (3 rd S. iii. 27.) In answer to 
your correspondent A. R. I. B. A., I can say that 
*' pamment brick " is in common use in Suffolk. 
The brick is usually half the thickness and double 
the width of an ordinary brick ; that is, about 
nine inches square, and about two inches thick. 
The word is no doubt a corruption of "pave- 
ment," and this is further shown by the common 
use of the brick to make pavements in court- 
yards, passages, &c. P. W. GISSING. 



NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC. 

Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series, East Indies, 
East India, C/iina, and Japan, 1513 1616, preserved in 
Her Majesty's Record Office and elsewhere. Edited ly 
W. Noel Sainsbury, Esq., of the Public Record Office, 
under the Direction of the Master of the Rolls, and with 
the Sanction of H.M. Secretary of State for the Colonial 
Department. (Longman.) 

At the present moment, when mercantile men are 
looking so hopefully towards India, and the thoughts of 
merchants and philanthropists alike are looking with 
equal hope towards the results of the approaching Ex- 
pedition to China, it would be difficult to imagine a 
volume of the Calendars of our State Papers which could 
be more opportunely published than this, for which we 
are indebted to Mr. Sainsbury, and which is devoted to 
all the State Papers now existing relative to the East 
Indies, China, and Japan, between the years 1513 and 
1616. These papers, which are some 1200 in number, 
are; derived not only from the State Paper Office, but 
also from the British Museum and the India House. 
The volume comprises, to speak generally, all the papers 
connected with the early voyages for the discovery of 
the north-west or other passages to India or Cathay to 
the year 1616, in the Public Record Office and the British 
Museum ; and from the India Office all the original Cor- 
respondence from that office, and the Court Minutes of 
the Company from its establishment in 1600. The chief 
subjects illustrated by these various papers are, the early 
voyages for the discovery of the North-east or North- 
west passage ; the establishment of the East India Com- 
pany ; the various successes of the early voyages to the 
East Indies ; an account of the settling of the different 
factories; the commencement of a commercial inter- 
course with Persia ; the first attempts at establishing a 
direct trade with China ; and lastly, the opening of a 
communication with Japan, " through a series of adven- 
tures," to use Mr. Sainsbury's own words, " as romantic 
as the history of Robinson Crusoe." When we add that 
these documents are so fully calendared as to give every 
information as to their contents, and that, like all the 
volumes of the Series, the papers are fully and carefully 
indexed, we have said enough to show what good service 
Mr. Sainsbury has done for historical students, and 
thereby for the increase of his own literary reputation. 

The Bibliographer's Manual of English Literature. By 
William Thomas Lowndes. New Edition^ revised, cor- 
rected, and enlarged by Henry G. Bohn. Part VIII. 
(Bohn.) 

On one article alone in this new Part of Bohn's Lowndes 
might Mr. Bohn rest content to claim credit for the 
general improvement of this edition of The Bibliographer's 
Manual over its predecessor. That article is the one 
which records, as far as Mr. Bohn's researches have 
enabled him to do so, every printed edition of Shakspeare's 



Works, whether published collectively or separately, all 
the volumes written respecting him, commonly called 
Shakspeariana ; all foreign translations ; new and careful 
collations of the first four Folios, and of the earlier edi- 
tions of the separate Plays and Poems. Besides the 
article Shakspeare, which a'lone occupies nearly 120 pages, 
the present Part contains greatly enlarged articles on 
Ritson, Rochester, Royal Society, Schiller, Scotland, Sir 
Walter Scott, Henry Shaw, Shelley, Sheridan, Shirley, 
and Sir Philip Sidney. 

We have received a copy of a new daily paper, the 
Danmark, which has just been started in Copenhagen, 
in consequence of the increased intimacy of the relations 
between this country and Denmark. It will contain, 
every Thursday, an English article on the political and 
literary events of the Northern kingdom. 

We beg to call the attention of our readers to an 
Advertisement in our present Number, which has for its 
object the Recovery of an ancient Greek MS. and of an 
early Picture. 



BOOKS AND ODD VOLUMES 

WANTED TO PURCHASE. 

G. J. KENNEDY'S REMARKS ON MR. MITCHELL'S EDITION OF A 

PHANES, and MITCHELL'S REPLY. 
*** Letters stating particulars and lowest price, carriage free, to 

sent to MESSRS. BF.LL & DALDY, Publishers of " NOTES AF 

QUERIES," 136, Fleet Street, E.G. 

Particulars of Price, &c. of the folio wing Books to be sent direct 
the gentlemen by whom they are required, and whose names and ai 
dresses are given for that purpose : 
THE WORKS OP Da.. NOYS, Dean of Canterbury. 

Wanted by Rev. Dr. Parkinson, Ravendale, Grimsby. 

FATTHORNE'S PLAN OF LONDON. Old edition, A.D. 1658; or the me 
edition re-engraved by Evans, 1857. 

Wanted by Kev. J. JTaskell, Tower Hill, London, E.G. 



to 

We are compelled to postpone until next iceek Organs in Italy, < 
Francis have written Junius' Letters ? Registers of Stationers' < 
pany, Noticeable Entries in Registers of Allhnllows Barking, "' 
V. and Yuste, and many other Papers of great interest. 

GEORGE LLOYD. We presume the Lazy German, to whom our Cc 
ftiondent refers, is Glaus Narr. the celebrated Covrt Fool of the Elt 
Frederick of Saxony. I/is hi-iorii teas frequently printed .-,- one of i 
German Volksbucher. See FlageVs Geschichte der Hoffnarren, 
et seq. 

H. M. (Bradninch.) Cheat Breads i by some thought to be an dbbr 
tion of manchet, or flne bread ; but is by JSOTU ex-plained to mean i 
hold bread, or bread of the second sort. 

INA. The political ballad, " This is the time," A.D. 1679-80, is prin 
from a more perfect copy in Wilkins's Political Ballads, i. 216, ed. 1860. 

H. KELLY. On the supposed virtues of a child's caul, see " N. & Q.* 
2nd S. iii. 329,397, 397, 516. 

J. H. B. The Orations of Arsanes agaynst Philip the trecherousi 
King of Macedone. with a Notable Example of God's Vengeance uppon [ 
a faithlesse Kyng, Queue, and her children, printed b;/ John Da>/e, n.d. 
8vo, is ascribed by Tanner to Thomas Norton. The, " notable exam"'' 
is the star// of the wicked young Kintj Popiel, ivho, at the instigation i 
Queen, poisoned his uncles ; to revenge u:hose, i/eaths an army of 
grown rats is said to have arose out of their carcases, and inces~ 
pursued him through land, fire, water, guards, <-e. .' 

ERRATA. 3rd S. i. p. 3?, col. i. line 26, for "Sanchie " read 
chie;" line 31, for "Temple" read " Semple; " and vol. iii. p. 37, 
last word on last line, for " width " read " length." 

"NOTES AND QUBIUKS" is published at noon on Friday, and it alto 
issued in MONTHLY PARTS. The Subscription for STAMPED COPIZS for 
Six Months forwarded direct from the Publishers (including the Half- 
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/awouro/MussRs.BELL AND DA.LDY, 186, FLBKT STREET, B.C.; to whom 
all COMMUNICATIONS FOR THB EDITOR should ~ 



IMPORTING TEA without colour on the leaf 

prevents the Chinese passins off inferior leaves as in the usual kinds. I 
Uorniman's Tea is unculou.red, therefore, always good alike. Sola U 
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S . III. JAN. 17, '63.] 



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[8** S. III. JAN. 17, '63. 



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English, Irish, and Scottish History. 

Accession of Henry VI Napoleon's Escape from Elba Executk 
of Argyle-Duke of Wellington and Lady Holland-Henry VID 
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Milton-Unpublished MSS. of W. Fiske -Richard Savage's Impo 
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Record Commission Publications Mathematical Bibliography. 

Popular Antiquities and Folk Lore. 

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Death-Gloves-Turnspit Dogs Whittington and his Cat Net 
County Feasts-The Rod in the Middle Ages-St. Cecilia, the Patr 
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Aberdeenshire Folk Lore. 

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Ballad of Sir James the Rose Inedited Lines by Dryden Hint 
trations of Shakspeare and Chaucer Songs of Joseph Mather 
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Endymion. 

Popular and Proverbial Sayings. 

Ods-bobs and Buttercups After Meat, Mustard Antrim Pro verbs 
Eating the Mad Cow Congleton Bible and Bear Roundheads. 

Philology. 

Words derived from Proper Names Tyre and Retyre Kaynard 
and Canard Faroe and Fairneld. 

Genealogy and Heraldry. 

Families of Field and De la Field Curious Characters in Legh's 
Accidence St. Leger Family De 1'Isle or De Insula Family 
Family of the Bowles Mutilation of Monuments Letters on 
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Fine Arts. 

Turner and Lawrence Statue of George I Pictures of the Gre&t 
Earl of Leicester Picture of Paley. 

Ecclesiastical History. 

Cardinal's Cap Rood Lofts Marrow Controversy The Name of 
Jesus Bishops in Waiting Early MSS. of the Scriptures Com- 
plutensiau Polyglot. 

Topography. 

Great Tom of Oxford Jerusalem Chamber South. wark or St. 
George's Bar Pole Fair at Corby Essex Clergy men Lord Mayor's! 
Diamond Sceptre. 

Miscellaneous Notes, Queries, and Replies. 

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61 



LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARYS, 1863. 

CONTENTS. NO. 56. 

NOTES: -Noticeable Entries in the Registers of Allhal- 
lows Barkins; 61 Charles V. and Yuste, 62 Organs m 
Sy63-The Registers of the Stationers' Company , 64 

Macaronic Verses, 66. 

MINOR NOTES: Nottingham TypographyA Prophecy 
in Jest -Enigma -The Lukins and the Windhams, 66. 

OTJERIES : Junius's Letters : could Francis have written 
them? 67 -Anonymous -Authorship Wanted - Beard, 
the Actor and Singer - Blairs, Perth - William Brown- 
sword -Catton (Charles, Father and Son) -John Davies 

Detaining the Parting Soul : a Lancashire Superstition 

The Eccentric Society Sir Adrian Fortescue Cap- 
tain Sir Henry Fowkes Futhey, Futhie Richard 
Garthwaite-"The Merry Journey "- Muffled Peal on 
St. Stephen's Day Margaret Fuller Ossoli Phrases 
Porteus Family Rat's Bones in Sepulchres Ritchie 
of Prestoune, Scotland, 1680 Sighs and Tears the Attor- 
neys of Widows Old Tradition : Trent River, 67. 

QUERIES WITH ANSWERS: The' Cenci Mrs. Inchbald's 
Dr. Warren Buckhorse, the Pugilist Knuckle-duster 
Last Prior of Carlisle Leng's Aristophanes Rev. Joseph 
Collet Little Horned Parliament, 70. 

REPLIES: John Hampden, 72 Heiress's Son, 73] 
Yorkshire Sufferers in 1746, 74, Samuel Rowe, Ib. 
Printed Wills Peerage Forfeited Dr. Richard King- 
ston Oil Wells Order of St. John of Jerusalem Di- 
minutive Cross-legged Figures Architectural Societies 
ThePortlanders Ignez de Castro Bishop Ken Hop- 
pesteres in Chaucer Galloway, Carrick, and Hay of 
Drumsboot Holyrood House Pitcairney Lawsuit 
Rev. Benjamin Way Pulteney's' Marriage John Wilkes : 
his Family Polvartist : John Howeli Sir Francis 
Cherry Don Carlos " The English Ape," &c., 75. 

Notes on Books, &c. 



NOTICEABLE ENTRIES IN THE REGISTERS OF 
ALLHALLOWS BARKING. 

Book III. 16761749. 

This book commences with an elaborately writ- 
ten title-page, succeeding which is a copy, in 
English and Latin, of the 70th canon ; written 
with great care, evidently by the hand of a pro- 
fessional scribe. The remainder of the volume is 
in the autograph of the successive vicars, curates, 
or parish clerks : it is well kept, and is 'per- 
fect in every respect. There are many pages in 
the handwriting of the celebrated Dr. George 
Hickes, vicar here from 1680 to 1686. 

Baptisms 

and births ; the dates of both being regularly entered. 
The following are the most remarkable : 
1G77, Aug. 14, Thomas, sonne of Capt. John Kempthorne 

and Ann his wife. 

1679, Jan. 25. Frances, daur. of Sir Benj. Newlaud and 
Ann his wife. 

Jan. 31. Laud, son of William Cade, clerk, and 

Elizabeth his wife. 

1681, April 22. Joanna, dau. of Capt. John Kempthorne. 

1682, Aug. 8. Mary, dau. of Sir Benjamin Newland and 

Anne his wife. 

1683, June 16. John, son of Capt John Kempthorne and 

Ann his wife. 

168G, April 3. Simon Peter, an Indyan, serv* to M r John 
Wescot, being about 13 years. 
[The names of the sponsors are given.] 



1687, Nov. 4. James, sou of Sir Pohcaryus Wharton and 

Theophile. 

1688, Jany 25. Mary Alysabet, an Indian Black aged 16, 

servant to M Richardson of this p h . 
Feby 9. Benjamin, son of Sir Benjamin Newland 

and Anne his Lady. 
1696, Dec r 26. Stephen Goddard, Sir Benj. Newland's 

negro, about 32 years old. 
1708, June 27. Mary, dau r of Sir Roger Dunkley and 

Elizabeth his wife, 

1711, Sept !4, William Henry, son of William Hasler 

and Martha his wife. 

[This is the first instance of a double Christian name, 
and almost the only instance till quite late in the eigh- 
teenth century.] 

1712, May 26. Littleton, son of Harcourt Masters, Esq r , 

and Ann his wife. 

1714, Dec r 19. Jane, dau r of Sir Harcourt Masters and 

Lady Ann his wife. 

1715, Oct. 18. Alexarnder, soon of Archable Brice and his 

wife. 

[I copy this for its choice orthography, evidently by 
the parish clerk.] 

1717, July 3. Dorcas dau r of Sir Hercourt Masters and 
Ann his Lady. 

1719, Dec r 12. Henry "Hunter, son of Sir Harcourt Mas- 
ters and dame Ann. 

1721, Dec r 6. Fleetwood and Nicholas, sons of Capt. 
Nich s Haddock and firances his wife. 

Marriages. 

1687, Dec r 29. John Richardson, M.A., Clerk, of Hendon, 
in the Co. of Midd., ccelebs, and Alice Billing- 
ton, soluta, of the same par. were marr d by 
licence. John Gaskarth. 

[From the year 1682 marriage entries always bear the 
name of the officiator.] 

1689, Ap 1 1. John Gilbert, Clericus, of Thrumpton in the 
Co. of Notts, coelebs, and Henrietta Danvers, of 
S. Clement Danes, soluta, were mared per Li- 
cence. 

1696, June 1. John Winter of the Town of Southampton, 

Widower, and Ann Newland, Dau r of S r Benja- 
min Newland of Allh. Barking, soluta, were 
marrd by Special Licence. 

1697, Api 2. Edw d Littleton, Clericus, of S' Dunstans in 

the East, coelebs, and Mary Collins of the same 

par., soluta. 

[Very few banns marriages appear. The rule is " per 
licence," banns the exception. The name of Henry 
Sachevrall, D.D. is appended to several weddings in 
1710.] 
1717, Oct. 29. Sir Barntiam Rider of y e par. of Burton 

Mount, Chelsea, in the co. of Kent, and Susana 

Littleton of the par. of Chatham in the same 

county. 

[Query, Why are some ladies entered ^ as "soluta," 
others as " spinster," and a few only as "virgin?" The 
term " vidua " is frequent, but as regards single women, 
why are the above terms irregularly used?] 

Burials. 

1678, Aug. 27. M Ann Layfield, the wife of D r Ed. Lay- 

field (Vicar.) 

1679, Nov. 11. Joan, wife of James Hickson, Esq r . 
Feby 16. M r Anthony Death. 

[This gentleman possessed a tomb in the body of the 
church (now lost) inscribed: "Antonius Death, A.M., 
Auke Pembroch. Cantab. Ob. Feb. 9, ./Era Christ! 1679, 



62 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[8'* S. III. JAN. 24, '63. 



Hujus parochise Benefactor Magnificus." He left a sum 
of money for providing a university education for poor 
scholars, which the parish still enjoys. I presume he 
was the curate or lecturer, although there are no re- 
cords.] 

March 4. Nicholas, son of Sir Rich. Haddock. 

1C80, Aug. 10. Doctor Ed. Layfield. 

[For an account of Layfield, see " N. & Q." 3 rd S. ii. 
145 ; also London and Middlesex Archaeological Trans- 
actions, 1862.] 

1683, Dec* 3. Anne, wife of W> Smith, curate. 

1684, May 18. Joseph, son of Sir Ric. Haddock. 

1688, Sept. 6. M r W m Smith, M.A., reader at this church. 

1689, June 25. James Hickson, Esq r . 

[Has a handsome monument on the wall of the south 
aisle, by which it appears that he was a brewer and alder- 
man of London, and died at the age of eighty-two. The in- 
scription commemorates his good deeds. He founded an 
almshouse for six poor people at South Mims, endowing 
it with 247. per ann. He also founded a school in All- 
hallows Barking, for the education of twenty children, mak- 
ing the Brewers' Company trustees. The company have 
been faithful stewards, and the school is at present in a 
flourishing state as the Tower Hill Grammar School, 
under a master who is in holy orders. To poor freemen, 
Hickson leaves 10/. per ann. ; also other legacies to the 
poor of Allhallows. The monument was erected by his 
executors. It is of white marble adorned with columns, 
and entablature of the Corinthian order. The arms or, 
two eagles' legs in saltier, sable. The epitaph is cor- 
rectly copied in Strype's Surrey of London, 1720 } and in 
The New View of London, 1708.] 

1689, Dec r 20. The Lady Ann, wife of Sir Benj. New- 
land. 
1691, Dec r 28. The Lady Joanna Kempthorne. 

[She lies under a large marble gravestone, nearly 
defaced, which describes her as "Widow of Sir John 
Kempthorne, that famous sea commander of his time."] 
1693, Sept. 12. Capt. Sam 1 Aoreman. 
1695, Api 15. John Kettlewell. 

[The memorial, consisting of a small white marble 
tablet with enrichments of cherubim, &c., is placed on 
the pillar of the easternmost chancel arch. There is 
a long Latin inscription, which describes him as "Pastor 
iidissimus, prudentissimusque ; Fortune tandem utriusque 
Victor. Animam Deo reddidit, Ap. 12, A.D. 1695. Mt&t. 
42." The Life of Kettlewell is prefixed to the complete 
edition of his works, published by Dr. Hickes and Rob. 
Nelson in 1719. The funeral rites were solemnised by 
Bishop Kenn, who read the burial office, and the whole 
evening service at Allhallows Barking, on the occasion. 
He was buried here by his own desire, " to lie in the same 
grave where Archbp. Laud was before interred," within 
the rails of the altar. The monument was erected by his 
widow. I apprehend the epitaph was written by Dr. 
George Hickes. For farther particulars respecting this 
excellent divine see "N. & Q." 3 rd S. i. 91. The widow 
was not interred here. The complete epitaph is correctly 
copied in the Life above-mentioned, in Seymour and 
Strype's Survey, and in that curious volume, The New 
View of London, 1708.] 

1695, Aug*. 9. Rich. Hutchinson, Esq*. 

1696, Aug' 17. Giles Lytcott, Esq r . 

[This gentleman has a monument of rather singular 
character on the wall of the north chancel aisle. It con- 
sists of a single pillar, a Doric column, surmounted by an 
urn, and at the base a territic skull. Lytcott is described 
is of Stratford-Langthorne, in Essex", nephew of the 



celebrated Sir Thomas Overbuy. He was the first Comp- 
troller-General of the Customs, which office he executed 
from 1671 till his death. The epitaph may be found in, 
full in Strype's edition of Stow's Survey, vol. ii. 1720.} 

1699, Dec. 11. Sir Benjamin Newland. 
Aug 1 1. John Winder, Esq r . 

[Has a curious monument on the south wall, an Ionic 
column supporting a coat of arms, and inscription on the 
pedestal. He is described as of Gray's Inu.] 

1700, Mar. 23. The Lady Winn. 

1703, Dec r 1. " M" Sarah Gaskarth dum conjugii so- 
cietas, fuit per Decennium, breve tempns, feli- 
cem mei, uxor mea, charissima mini, amantis- 
sima mei ; Omnis mecum in vita hac instabili 
varietatis, turn qua in Hominum moribus et 
ingenio, turn qua in rebus sunt vicissitudinuno, 
qua fidelitate, qua prudentia, consors ! Lsetorum 
laetamen, molestiarum remedium atque alleva- 
mentum. Cujus cum scribo nomen, recitoque 
diuturnus, dolor ac desyderium refricantur. Sed 
hen ista quam frustra sunt ! 

" JOHN GASKARTH, D.D." 

1713, Oct. 18. Barabas, soon of Barabas Bowen. 

[What could induce a man to desire to perpetuate 
so undesirable a name?] 

1714, Febr 7. Sir Rich. Haddock at Lea in Essex. 
1719, Decem. 15. Dame Anne Masters. 

1732, Dec r 17. The Rev d Doctor John Gaskarth. 

[This is the first instance of a clergyman being en- 
titled Rev. I believe the use of this title during life is 
quite modern. For Gaskarth, vicar here from 1686 to 
1732, see London and Middlesex Archaeological Society's? 
Transactions, 1862.] 

1740, July 17. Ann Colleton from Stratford in Essex. 

[This lady has an ambitious monument under the east 
window 'of the south aisle of the chancel. The sculptor 
was Scheemakers, and represents a sarcophagus, with a 
bust of the deceased, weeping boys, &c. The inscription 
describes her as " youngest daughter of Sir Peter Colleton 
of St. James, Bart, at whose desire and cost this tomb 
was erected " in memory of her and the family of 
Richardsons of this parish, connected by marriage. Rob. 
Richardson gave the elegant oak altar-piece in 1685. 
Ann Colleton left 20/. to the Ward School, and 101. per 
ann. to the poor.] 

1744, Jan? 28. The Rev d M' Charles Stuart. 
[Curate of the parish.] 

' v JUXTA TURRIM. 



CHARLES V. AND YUSTE. 

I believe I am correct in stating, that the 
motives which influenced Charles V. in choosing 
the Monastery at Yuste for his abode after his 
abdication in 1555, have never been satisfactorily 
explained. Such is the opinion of Mr. Stirling 
"n his most valuable and interesting book, The 
Cloister Life of the Emperor Charles V. (2nd 
ed., London, p. 32.) 

Mr. Prescott certainly gives no authority for his 
assertion, " that the place (Yuste) had attracted 
the eye of emperor many years before, when on a 
visit to that part of the country ; then he marked 



&* S. III. JAN. 24, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



63 



it for his future residence. (History of Philip II. 
p. 11, ed. London, 1855.) 

As Mr. Stirling remarks, there was no palace or 
hunting seat of the crown near enough to the 
Yera of Plasencia to make the emperor familiar 
with so remote a spot as Yuste ; nor do the annals 
of the monastery, or those of Plasencia, contain 
any record of an imperial visit. But though there 
is "no direct evidence to show why Charles V. 
chose Yuste as his retreat in preference to other 
pleasants spots in Spain, yet it is not improbable 
that when the emperor made a pilgrimage to the 
shrine of our Lady at Guadalupe in 1525, or 
when he spent a few days at Oropesa on his way 
to Seville the following year, he may have heard 
of the natural charms of the place. The fame of 
the beautiful Vera of Plasencia, with its nine 
leagues of pasture and forest, " ubi ver est purpu- 
reum et perpetuum," says Mr. Ford, *" where 
river, rock, and mountain ; city, castle, and aque- 
duct, under a heaven of purest ultra-marine, com- 
bine to enchant the artist," may indeed have 
frequently reached the ear of the emperor. But 
Mr. Ford (Hand- Book for Spain, vol. ii. p. 497, 
1855), suggests another motive why the spot was 
selected. It seems that when the emperor's son 
Philip was on his way from Spain to England to 
marry our Queen Mary, he was requested by his 
father to visit Yuste, and to send him an account 
of the place. This shows that the emperor had 
himself never visited the spot, though Robertson, 
in his Life of the Emperor Charles V. (book xii.), 
states it as a positive fact that his majesty, jjn 
passing through Plasencia, visited the monastery, 
and was so struck with its delightful situation, 
that he observed to some of his attendants, " This 
is a spot to which Diocletian might have retired 
with pleasure." 

The Monastery of Yuste is often erroneously 
called, " The Monastery of San Yuste, St. Just, 
or St. Justus," as if the place was named after a 
saint. This mistake is made even by some Spanish 
writers as well as French and English. But it is 
certain that Yuste is not a saint's name, but a 
small stream, which descends from the sierra, be- 
hind the walls of the monastery, which was inhabited 
by monks of the Hieronymite order. (See El 
Jfeftro, Estancia, y Muerte del Emperudor Carlos 
Quinto, en el Monasterio de Yuste, por el Sefior 
Don Tomas Gonzalez) preserved in MS. in the 
Archives of the Foreign Office, Paris. 

I may mention that the present proprietor of 
Yuste^ is about to restore the venerable old build- 
ings, in Consequence, it is said, of the interest 
excited in the spot by recent writers, more espe- 
cially by Mr. Stirling. This I mention on the 
authority of the Rev. Richard Roberts's Autumn 
'Tour in Spain in the Year 1859, p. 225. 

JOHN D ALTON. 

Norwich. 



ORGANS IN ITALY. 

I remember six organs in St. Peter's, and am 
not sure there are not more. There are two very 
large ones in what we very incorrectly call the choir, 
but which is known there by its proper designa- 
tion of the Tribune : two in the choir, an im- 
mense chapel on the left-hand of the nave as you 
enter ; one in the Chapel of the Sacrament, and 
one in the Sacristy: those in the Tribune stand 
upon large platforms, on which also the singers, 
the conductor (Maestro di Capella), and some 
double-bass players are placed. The whole is 
moved on immense rollers according to the num- 
ber of the congregation or space intended to be 
occupied. The largest I could not get access to. 
The smaller, or ripieno organ, had one row of 
keys, fourteen stops, among which were metal 
diapasons to a large scale, and two octaves of 
pedals. In almost all large churches in Italy 
there are two organs, one on each side, which are 
played in duo concertante by two players. One 
perhaps will take the string band part of a com- 
position, while the other plays that of the wind 
band, and sometimes they will play duets on the 
solo stops. The effect is extremely fine, the most 
like that of an orchestra I ever heard, and the 
organists among the'best in Europe. They play 
with extraordinary fire and vigour, and at the 
same time with great breadth of style. The same 
man will play a fugue of Palestrina's, and imme- 
diately after the last favourite motivo of the 
opera equally well. However incongruous this 
may appear to our ears, both are equally well done. 
Organists elsewhere either seem to have their 
fingers tied, or to scramble over the notes, as if 
playing on the piano-forte. The Italians are 
masters of the instrument in any style. 

In the large Jesuit church at Rome there are 
three organs. Two, as before described, and one 
over the entrance door, raised as high as possible, 
in fact, close to the ceiling. This third organ is 
mainly of large reed stops, resembling in fact 
trombones, and comes in at intervals in the per- 
formance with splendid effect. 

The most I ever saw in any church combined 
together was at San Antonio at Padua. There 
are four large organs there, occupying the four 
sides of the main supports of the great central 
dome. On grand festivals they are played on in 
concert by the four best players that can be had. 
The tradition is, that Saint Antony of Padua was 
a great lover of music, and an excellent organist 
himself. It is not improbable that, from the cir- 
cumstance that he is always depicted with a hog 
following him, the saying about " pigs playing 
the organ " has arisen. 

It is, however, a very curious fact, that while 
the Pope says mass no instrumental music what- 
ever is permitted. In the Sistine Chapel there 
is no organ; and at high papal masses at St. 



64 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAX. 24, '63. 



Peter's no music accompanies the mass itself, al- 
though a splendid wind band is stationed high up 
in the dome, kept quite out of sight, and occa- 
sionally breathes out strains of music with magi- 
cal effect. The former circumstance would lead 
one almost to believe the Presbyterians are right 
in saying that instrumental music was forbidden 
in the early Christian church. Be this as it may, 
the Italian organists certainly stand very high in 
the rank of musicians. A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 



THE REGISTERS OF THE STATIONERS' 
COMPANY. 

(Continued from 3 rd S. iii. 2.) 

xxviij Dec. [1594]. Tho. Millington. Entred 
to him, &c., a ballad Shewinge the treason lately 
wrought against the Frenche Kinge, who was by a 
Jesuite of younge yeares suddenlie wounded in the 
face, who had thought to have murdered him . vj d . 

iij Januarij [1594-5]. Richard Jones. Entred 
for his copie, &c. a booke intituled Pan his pipe, 
conteyninge Three pastorall Eglogs in englishe 
Hexamiter, with other delightful verses . vj d . 

This work was by William Warner, who in 1586 pub- 
lished his Albion's England, often reprinted. The proba- 
bility is that he had previously written Pan his Syrinx 
or Pipe compact of seven Reeds, because such a work was 
entered by T. Purfoot on Sept. 22, 1584. (See Extracts 
from the Stat. Registers pr. by the Shakesp. Soc. ii. 192.) 
Here we find it recorded, on the same authority, in 1594-5, 
and it was most likely published, or republished, at that 
date. Therefore the edit, to which Ritson seems to refer 
in 1597, and which certainly then came from Purfoot's 
press (because copies of it were sold at the White Knights 
and Roxburghe auctions), may have been a third impres- 
sion. We know of no copy of any date printed by Richard 
Jones, .who above claims it.] 

Tho. Millington. Entred for his copie, &c. a 
ballad, The Execution of John Chastell, that sought 
to murder thefrenche Kinge with a knife . vj d . 

xvij to Januarij. Tho. Creede. Entred for his 
copie, &c. a ballad called The Saylers joye, to 
the tune of heigh ho hollidaie, &c. . . . vj d . 

[We do not find any trace of this early naval song, but 
the tune is sometimes mentioned in humorous tracts of 
the time.] \ 

Richard Jones. Entred for his copie, &c. a 
booke intituled Aglassefor vayneglorious Women, 
conteyninge an envectyve againste the fantasticall 
devises in Women's apparell vj d . 

[This we take to be a re-entry of Gosson's attack upon 
the female sex, -which had been entered to Millington on 
the 28th Dec. preceding (see p. 3). Nevertheless, that 
may have been a distinct work ; and it is quite clear that 
the above registration applies to Gosson's Glasse to view 
the Pride of vainglorious Women, -c., which, in both the 
impressions of 1595 and 1596, bears the imprint of 
Richard Jones. It is a most curious piece.] 



xvj die Januarij. Tho. Creede. Entred for 
his copie, &c. a ballad intituled A pleasant newe 
Jigge of the broome man vj d . 

[In the margin is written" Kempe," so that we may 
be sure it was a theatrical "jig," which consisted of 
humorous singing and dancing. Kemp, the famous 
comedian, who performed in several of Shakespeare's 
plays, was doubtless dressed as a Broom-man, who 
carried and sold brooms in the streets, when he sang and 
acted this " jig." We believe that the only specimen of 
this kind of dramatic entertainment now extant was by 
Tarlton, the immediate predecessor of Kemp. It is called 
Tarlton's Jig of the Horse-load of Fools, a severe attack 
upon all classes, but especially upon the magistrates of 
London, because they were enemies to plays and players.] 

xvij die Januarij. Humfrey Lownes. Entred 
for his copie, &c. a booke intituled Cynthia, with 
certeyne Sonnettes, and the Legend of Cassandra. 

vj d . 

[The work of Richard Barnfield, some of whose sup- 
posed poems, in 'a subsequent publication, were in fad 
written by Shakespeare. They were surreptitiously in- 
troduced 'into Barnfield's Encomion of Lady Pecunia, 
1598, were assigned to Shakespeare in The Passionate 
Pilgrim, 1599, and honestly excluded by Barnsfield when 
he reprinted his Encomion in 1605. Thus the claim of 
our great dramatist is established. Barnfield's earliest 
work was his Affectionate Shepherd, 1594, which was 
' printed by T. Danter for T. G. and E.N.," and not for 
Lownes, like his Cynthia. In the interval, Barnfield had 
changed his publisher.] 

xxj Januarij. Raffe Blower. Entred for his 
copie, &c. a booke intuled A Communication sett 
forthe by R. Birde vj d . 

[If R. Birde had been W. Birde, the old composer and 
organist, there would have been great appropriateness 
in the selection of Blower for his stationer : we know 
nothing of R. Birde or of his work intuled (as the Clerk 
hastily wrote) A Communication. No doubt this was 
not the whole of the title, but it is all the functionary at 
the Hall apparently had time to copy. R. Birde might 
be a descendant of W. Birde, and there was a much em- 
ployed actor of that name in Henslowe's Company. See 
his Diary, passim. ] 

John Wolfe. Entred for his copie, &c. these 
three Bookes followinge, viz. one intituled the 
Sheppherdes prattles ; the second, The Reward 
of the Mercyfull ; the third, The estate of Chris- 
tians lyvinge under subjection of the turke . xviij d . 

[These were not ballads, but " books," and we may 
guess the first to have been a pastoral or pastorals. 
Many authors of the day, including W. Rankin, Gosson, 
Eedes, &c., wrote pastorals, but their works in this kind 
have not come down to us. Of the two other pieces, all 
we know of them is from this registration.] 

xxx die Januarij. Abell Jeffes. Entred for 
his copie, &c. the first parte of The Divells holding 
a parliament in hell for the providinge of statutes 
against pride ; the same being a ballad . . vj d . 

[Probably it related to the same sort of pride and 
vanity as S. Gosson had so vehemently attacked in his 
"Quippes" against female apparel; but this "ballad" 
may have had a more general application.] 



3*i S. III. JAN. 24, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



65 



iiij to die February . Edward White. Entred 
for his copie, &c., A pleasant Jigge betwene a 
Tinker and a Cloume V J 

[Doubtless a theatrical "jig," in which two comic 
actors took part very likely by William Ivempe; but 
no name is in the margin of the register, as was the case 
with Kempe's Jig of " the Broom-man " on 16th Jan.J 

v to die Febr. Thomas Gosson. Entred for his 
copie, &c. a ballad entituled a Lancashire man's 
joye for the late marriage of the right honorable 
the Erie of Derbie vj d . 

[Ferdinando, Lord Derby had died in 1594, and Stow 
gives a long account of his illness. It was his widow 
who was married to Sir Thomas Egerton (afterwards 
Baron Ellesmere) in 1600. Ferdinando was succeeded 
by his brother, William Stanley, and it was in celebra- 
tion of his marriage that this ballad was written. Stow's 
notice of this wedding runs thus (Annales, p. 1279) : 
" The 26 of January, the Earle of Darbie married the 
Earle of Oxford's daughter at the Court, then at Greene- 
wich, which marriage feast was there most royally kept."] 

xvij Febr. Tho. Gosson. Entred for his copie, 
&c. a ballad of Cuttinge George, and his hostis, 
beinge a Jigge vj d . 

[Jigs at this date, and with such comic actors seem to 
have become very favourite performances. It is possible 
that "Cutting George" was George Peele, who appears 
to have led a very irregular life. "Cutting Dick" 
flourished soon afterwards ; and it was about this time 
that the word " Cutter " came into general use.] 

xxviij die February. Thomas Man and John 
Porter. Entred for their copie, &c. a booke en- 
tituled The arreignment and Conviction of Usurye 
by Myles Mosse vj d . 

[Moss is an abbreviation of Moses ; and it would seem 
strange that a Jew, or the descendant of a Jew, should 
write sermons (there were six of them) against Usury. 
Perhaps Miles Mosse, whose first name does not seem to 
have been known (see Lowndes, p. 1304)] had been con- 
verted to Christianity and from usury." His volume 
bears date in 1595.] 

xxi die Febr. Cutbert Burbye. Entred for 
his copie, &c. a booke shewinge The Miraculous 
Judgement of God showen in Herefordshire, where 
a mightie barne filled with corne was consumed 
with fyre, begynninge last Christinas Eve, and. 
duringe fyftene dayes after vj d . 

Cutbert Burble. Entred alsoe to him for his 
copie a ballad of the same, &c vj d 

[This was considered a judgment upon a hoarder o 
corn, the price of which in 1595 (Stow, p. 1279) had 
risen from fourteen shillings to foure markea the 
quarter."] 

xxiiij to die Febr. Tho. Creede. Entred for 
his copie, &c. a ballad intiteled the First Parte 
of the Merchaunte 1 s daughter of Bristoll, 8fc. vj 

[This ballad, remarkable for its graceful simplicity 
and other excellences, may be seen at length in A Book 
ofEoxburghe Ballads, 4to, 1847. It is in two parts, bu 
here we see only the first part entered. It is mentioned 
as Maudlin, the Merchant's Daughter, in B. & F.'s Mon 
sieur Thomas, Act III. Sc. 3. The Kev. Mr. Dyce die 
not ascertain the date of the ballad, because he was no 



.ware of the above entry, which fixes it in 1595. The 
une was The Maiden's Joy.'] 

xxv die Febr. Josias Parnell. Entred for his 
;opies &c. ii bookes, the one entituled A trew 
discovery of ij notable villanyes practised by one 
Tudeth Phillips, the wyfe of John Phillips of 
Crowne allye in Bishopsgate' streete, and the other 
entituled The notorious cousenages of Dorothie 
Phillips, otherwise called Dol Pope. 

Also entred to him for his copie a ballad 
thereof xij d . 

[Stow says nothing of these persons, or of their crimes 
and punishments ; and no such " ij bookes " have come 
down to our time, that we are aware.] 

x die Marcij. William Leake. Entred for his 
copie, &c. The Thirde booke of Palmeryn of Eng- 
lande, to be printed in Englishe .... vj d . 

[We have never heard of any earlier impression of 
this translation than 1602, 4to, by A.M. ; and the second 
part bears date in 1609. The two parts were reprinted 
in 1639, published by B. Alsop and T. Fawcet. The 
whole was republished in 1664, and this was the edition 
Southey used in his version. He finds great fault with 
Munday and his assistants; but Southey's MS., now 
before us in fifty divisions, shows that from beginning to 
end, he did little more than alter his predecessor's trans- 
lation. Every addition and improvement is in Southey's 
hand-writing on an interleaved copy of the impression 
of 1664, "Printed by R. I. for S. S. to bee sold by 
Charles Tyers at the three Bibles on London Bridge."] 

x 8 die Marcij. Tho. Creede. Entred for his 
copie, &c. a booke entituled Mother redd cappe, 
her last will and Testament, conteyninge sundrye 
conceypted and pleasant tales, furnished with moche 
varietie to move delighte vj d . 

[Upon this humorous tract, 'in all probability, M. 
Drayton and A. Munday founded the comedy they wrote 
for Henslowe's Theatre in Dec. 1597 (Diary, pp. 106, 117), 
and it was included by the old manager among the 
stock-books he had bought for his company in March, 
1598. We find no other trace of it.] 

Tho. Creede. Entred alsoe for his copie, &c. a 
booke called Pheander, the mayden Knight, fyc. 

vj d - 

[Such a romance was printed in 1661, and it was 
doubtless a reprint of an earlier impression, which, we be- 
lieve, has not been recovered.] 

xiiij Febr. John Danter. Entred for his copie, 
&c. a ballad entituled The madd merye pranckes 
of Long Megg of Westminster'] .... vj d . 

[It was reprinted in 1814 from a copy dated 1635, and 
the title may be seen at length in Lowndes's Bibl. Man. 
p. 1248. No earlier edition is known. It appears from a 
passage in Nat. Field's Amends for Ladies, 1618, that a 
play under the title of Long Meg was then popular at 
the Fortune Theatre, and Henslowe's Diary records it 
under date of Feb. 14, 1594-5 : this was the very day 
that Danter made the above entry, perhaps in anticipa- 
tion of a MS. copy of the comedy which he hoped to pro- 
cure, on intending to have a ballad written upon the 
subject by some poet in his employ.] 4 



66 



KOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. Hi. JAN. 24. 't>3. 



Willm. Jones Entred for his copie, &c. 
booke intituled The Schoole of good manners . vj 

[This might be an early edition of Richard West's litt 
Book of Demeanour, which was reprinted about forty yea 
ago, having come out, as far as we now know, in 161 
The style is, however, considerably older. In 1605 ap 
peared a work, of which we shall have more to say here 
after, under the title of The Schoole of Slovenrie, and, pos 
sibly this name was founded upon the above entry of 27 
School of good Manners."] 

J. PAYNE COLLIER. 



yea, 



MACARONIC VERSES. 

Turning over some old papers I met with a copj 
of a song, which, nearly forty years ago, greath 
gratified the members of my College. 

If you think it worth preserving, pray publish 
it in your columns. Your doing so will reminc 
some few survivors of the occasion on which i 
was sung by its author, whose son, " Tom Brown,' 
must have derived some of his talents from his 
clever father. 

"THE ORIEL GRACE-CUP soxo. 
( Written by John Hughes, Esq., M.A., of Oriel ColJene 
and sung by him at the Celebration of the 500th year 
from the Foundation of that College.) 
" Exultet mater Oriel in imis penetralibus, 
Hunc tempus honestissimis vacare Saturnalibus ; 
Nunc versibus canendum est Latinis et lonicis, 
Nunc audiendum vatibus, ut mihi, macaronicis : 
Sing then, 
All true men, 
From pulpit, bar, and quorum ; 

Floreat Oriel, 
In saecla saeculorum ! 

*'. Quern mps delectet veterum, cui Oriel sit curie, 
Occasion! faveat non nobis reventurse : 
Man's race is short, alas ! to the coffin from the nursery, 
Five ages more shall pass with but one such anniver- 
sary. 

Sing then, &c. 



imt eTnov compotemus sodales, 
To the memory and renown of our Butlers and our 

Raleighs. 

And to sages yet unborn insignissimis virtute ; 
Who old Oriel shall adorn, when our bones have done 
their duty. 

Sing then, &c. 

" To our noble Head and Fellows true let's drink a 
health and blessing, 

O/ ujr ti-xpvTM Y,U,O.; tu, xeti zs.Xoit Ssra-Va'/x, 

Sit placens uxor singulis, sit res abunde domi : 

Per ora volet usque laus Edwardi atque Bromi. 

Sing then, &c. 

" Old and famous is our College, Sirs, as Romulus and 

Remus, 
An ancient Tree of Knowledge, Sirs, from groves of 

Academus : 
Lo! once five hundred years it flow'rs: then, more 

Antiquorum, 

We'll bask beneath its social bow'rs, and toast it in a 
jorum. 

Sing then, &c." ' 

'E. S. S. W. 



iHtnor 

NOTTINGHAM TYPOGRAPHY. I am about to 
print a list of books and pamphlets printed or 
published at Nottingham previous to 1790 or 
thereabouts. If any of your correspondents know 
of such publications, they would oblige me by first 
sending the short title, with date and author's 
name. If I have not the work, the loan of it will 
then be requested for two days, or instead, a full 
and exact copy of the title-page, with size and 
number of pages, would do nearly as well. 

S. F. CRESWELL, M.A. 

The School, Durham. 

A PROPHECY IN JEST. The following extract 
from a burlesque article in the New Monthly 
Magazine for 1821 (vol. ii.), entitled " Specimen 
of a prospective Newspaper, A.D. 4796," is curi- 
ous : 

" The army of the Northern States (of America) will 
take the field against that of the Southern Provinces 
early next spring. The principal northern force will 
consist of 1,490,000 picked troops. General Congreve's 
new mechanical cannon was tried last week at the siege 
of Georgia. It discharged in one hour 1120 balls, each 
weighing 5 hundred weight. The distance of the objects 
fired at was eleven miles, and so perfect was the engine 
that the whole of these balls were lodged in the space of 
twenty feet square." 

A subsequent article in this specimen states 
that, " by means of a new invention, Dr. Clark 
crossed the Atlantic in seven days." How little 
did the writer anticipate that, in forty years, these 
to him wild fancies, would be almost realised. It 
is worth notice that a war between North and 
South was anticipated. H. S. G. 

ENIGMA. I met with the following enigma 
several years ago, but have never seen the answer 
to it. I doubt much if it is not a mere hoax, like 
others in circulation ; but if it can be answered, 
.t certainly will be in " N. & Q." : 

" In jerkin short and nutbrown coat I live, 

Pleasure to all, and pain to all I give. 

Quivers I have, and pointed arrows too, 

Gold is my dart, and iron is my bow. 

Nothing I send, yet many things I write, 

I never go to war, yet always fight. 

Nothing I eat, yet I am always full, 

Poisons from books, and sweets from flowers I cull. 

A spotted back I have, an earthen scrip, 

Black is my face, and blubber is my lip. 

No tears I shed, and yet I always weep, 

Sleeping I wake, and'waking do I sleep." 

F. C. H. 

THE LUKINS AND THE WINDHAMS. Dr. Lu- 
in, formerly Dean of Wells, a somewhat cele- 
rated divine in his day, married Catherine, second 
aughter of Robert Doughty, Esq., co. Norfolk, 
"he father of the Dean was Robert Lukin (de- 
cended; from an ancient Essex family), whose 
econd wife married William Windham, and had 
yhim theRt. Hon. William Windham, the cele- 



3 rd S. III. JAX. 24, '03. ] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



67 



brated statesman, who entailed his estates on 
William Lukin, eldest son of the Dean of Wells, 
who in 1824 assumed the name of Windham, and 
succeeded to the Felbrigge Hall estate, and was 
the grandfather of Mr. W. F. Windham, whose 
name has lately been so often before the public. 
The Dean had the reputation of being a good 
liver, and fond of his bottle. He was a great 
encourager of cock-fighting, which was then car- 
ried on to a great extent in Wells. The following 
jeu (Tesprit is from the Dean's pen (written in 
1805), which exemplifies the character he bore : 

"A good slice of buck, and a bottle of claret, 
With mirth and good cheer, and no trouble to mar it, 
Makes a Layman to smile, makes a Parson so sleek ; 
Once a month is too seldom, it should be each week." 

, INA. 
Wells, Somerset, 



JUNIUS'S LETTERS : COULD FRANCIS HAVE 
WRITTEN THEM? 

P. H. S. (ante, p. 6) has contributed a curious 
fact, showing who among others was assumed by 
Junius's contemporaries to have been the author 
of these celebrated Letters. I have just stumbled 
upon a small paragraph, valuable for the very 
opposite reason, as showing that at least in the 
opinion of one of his contemporaries, Sir Philip 
Francis, whose claims to the authorship of Junius 
have, during the last quarter of a century, been 
so strenuously supported, was quite incapable of 
writing the Junius Letters. 

It is contained in the pamphlet entitled 
" Some Observations and Remarks on a late Publication, 
entitled ' Travels in Europe, Asia, and Africa,' in which 
the real Author of this Asiatic Atlantis, his Character, 
and his Abilities, are fully made known to the Public. 
2nd Edition, 1782." 

This pamphlet was written by Joseph Price, 
and is a violent attack upon the character and 
veracity^of James Macintosh, the author of the 
Travels in question, who was, he tells us, 

" An intimate friend and fellow labourer of the famous 
Colonel Macleane, not unknown in the former ministry 
of Lord Shelburne, and so much exposed by his News- 
paper Correspondence with John Wilkes, Esq." 

And while attacking Macintosh, the author does 
not spare Francis, whom he charges with engaging 
Mr. Macintosh at Calcutta " to return to Europe in 
order to batter down the character of Governor- 
General Hastings in the daily papers." 

But it is needless to enter into any details upon 
these points. I only wish to bring before the 
readers of " K & Q." the passage in which Price 
criticises Macintosh's 44th Letter : 

" The next, or forty- fourth Letter, seems to have been 
wruten with the sole intention of extolling the great 



abilities of his patron and friend Mr. Philip Francis. I 
shall, Mr. Macintosh, take occasion to inform the world 
that you needed not to have asked leave of that artful 
man to make a few short observations on his works. If 
he has written anything to the Honorable Company on 
the subject you speak of, they are not his own observa- 
tions. He is, Sir, no better 'than yourself, a copier or 
commentator on the works of other men ; the custom of 
writing minutes on political subjects to be entered on the 
face of the Company's consultations, at the members' 
own houses, has been the means of raising to Mr. Francis 
the little credit he has obtained. Whatever the Governor 
General proposed in council, Mr. Francis objected to, and 
promised a minute at a future meeting. A copy of the 
proposition was carried home. Messrs. Shore, Ducarrell, 
Anderson, Alexander, or Mr. Charles Grant were sent 
for ; the three first on all matters of revenue, or Hindoo 
laws or customs ; the fourth on affairs of the army ; and 
the fifth on mercantile affairs; they digested the minute, 
and Mr. Francis copied it and carried it to the board. To 
prove this, I refer to his crude and undigested letters to 
the Company exhibited in the second report of the Select 
Committee of the House of Commons, namely Nos. VII. 
and VIII. of the Appendix. He never thought that those 
curious productions would have been brought forward to 
the public eye, or he would have got Mr. William Har- 
wood, a very able Company's servant, who came home in 
the ship with him, to have revised them for him. But 
he, like his friend Mr. Macintosh, never fails to be 
caught tripping, when they attempt anything purely 
from their own knowledge. I shall prove the copartner- 
ship by and by." Pp. 535. 

Knowing that many who take an interest in 
the Junius controversy avow that one of their 
greatest difficulties lies in believing Sir Philip 
Francis to have been Junius arises from the fact, 
that the Junius Letters are written in a higher 
and better style, and with far greater power, than 
anything which is known to have proceeded from 
Francis's pen, I venture to forward to " N". & Q." 
the passage which I have accidentally met with, 
and which shows the low estimation as a writer 
in which Francis was held by one who seems to 
have known pretty intimately both the man and 
his writings. W. O. W. 



ANONYMOUS. The following is the title of a 
pamphlet, concerning the authorship of which I 
should be glad to receive information : 

Letters on the Utility and Policy of employing Ma- 
chines to Shorten Labour; occasioned by the late Dis- 
turbances in Lancashire : to which are added some Hints 
for the further Extension and Improvement of our Wool- 
len Trade and Manufactures. "Upon every invention 
of value, we erect a statue to the inventor, and give him 
a liberal and honourable reward." Lord Bacon's Atlantis. 
London : Printed for T. Becket, Corner of the Adelphi, 
Strand, 1780. 

W. G. A. 

Great Seal Patent Office. 

AUTHORSHIP WANTED. I have before me a 
folio volume, apparently of the early part of last 
century, wanting title and the first eight pages. 



68 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[8* S. III. JAK. 24, '63. 



It is a Commentary on select parts of the Gospels 
and the Acts, chiefly taken from the Fathers and 
Reformers. The preface, ending on p. 29, con- 
tains " The Order of things related in the Gos- 
pels." The remarks on St. Matthew commence 
on p. 31 with, " Having hitherto laboured in re- 
ducing all things delivered by the holy Evangelists 
into a due order," &c. ; and the concluding re- 
marks on Acts, ends on p. 621, followed by the 
Table, and Catalogue of Writers. Can anyone 
supply me with a copy of the title-page, including 
date ? J. K. 

BEARD, THE ACTOR AND SINGER. Where is 
Beard's runaway marriage with Lady Henrietta 
Herbert mentioned by Horace Walpole ? Cun- 
ningham (Letters, vol. i. note,) says " further on," 
but the passage has escaped me, as it has also 
escaped that lynx-eyed man the Index maker. 

DELTA. 

BLAIRS, PERTH. There was a family of this 
name which followed Simon Glover's ancient trade 
in the fair city about 1700. They were " con- 
nected with an ancient family of the name in the 
county." I should like to hear more of them. 
One of them marries a Katherine Threipland. 
Who was she ? 2. e. 

WILLIAM BROWNSWORD, of Emmanuel College, 
B.A. 1645-6 ; M.A. 1649 ; was, in 1658, presented 
by Trinity College, Cambridge, to the vicarage of 
Kendal, which he retained till 1672. In 1663 
occurs a letter of Sir Philip Musgrave on his be- 
half, wherein he states that Brownsword had fully 
conformed and written in defence of the Act of 
Uniformity and against the Covenant ; adding 
that he was an excellent preacher, worthy of 
special favour, and would be much missed from 
the place. (See Green's Cal. Dom. State Papers, 
Chas. //., iii. 296, 297.) We have been unable 
to find any other notice of the works of Brown - 
sword to which Sir Philip Musgrave alludes. 

C. H. & THOMPSON COOPER. 
Cambridge. 

CATTON (CHARLES, FATHER AND SON.) The 
elder Catton, one of the original forty Royal 
Academicians, was an heraldic painter, and is best 
known by the English Peerage (3 vols. 4to, 
1790), the third volume of which " consists 
wholly," says Moule in his Bibliotheca Heraldica, 
" of plates of the achievements of the nobility 
engraved by F. Chesham, from the designs of 
Charles Catton, R.A., a heraldic painter, who 
ranked high in his profession." He was Master 
of the Company of Paper Stainers, and received 
the appointment of coach painter to George III. 
He occasionally attempted a higher branch of 
art, having painted the full-length portrait of 
Alderman Ives (Mayor, 1769), which hangs 
among the civic worthies who adorn the walls of 



St. Andrew's Hall at Norwich. He also painted 
the great altar-piece, representing ^ the Angel 
delivering St. Peter from prison, which was pre- 
sented in 1768 by his friend Alderman Starling to 
the church of St. Peter's Mancroft, in the same 
city. His son practised as a stage scene-painter, 
and occasionally painted portraits also. I am 
desirous of knowing whether any portraits, either 
by the father or the son, exist, beside the one 
above-mentioned, and another which is now in my 
possession, marked on the back " C. Catton, Jun. 
1773." It is an admirable picture, and is be- 
lieved to be a portrait of his father. In a bundle 
of letters written by the elder Catton to his aunts 
at Norwich, and extending over a period of full 
thirty years, he makes frequent mention of the 
king and of several of the nobility by whom he 
was patronised as a coach-painter ; also of his 
friends Sir Joshua Reynolds, Chambers (the 
Architect), Dr. Jebb the King's Physician, and 
others, with whom he appears to have been inti- 
mate ; but the only allusion to /?orrzY-painting 
I can find is in a letter dated 1773, in which he 
says that Charles has sent his aunts a copy of his 
(i. e. the father's) portrait. Nothing is said about 
the original, which I strongly suspect mine to be ; 
at all events, it certainly deserves higher com- 
mendation than his father's simple expression, 
" It is well performed." Q. 

JOHN DAVIES, of Trinity College, Cambridge, 
B.A. 1789 (12th wrangler); Fellow of 17; 
M.A. 1792 ; was minister of St. Margaret's Chapel, 
London, in 1805, when he published a funeral 
sermon. We shall be glad of information as to 
the time of his death. Contemporary with him 
was another John Davies, of the same College; 
B.A. 1765; Fellow, 176- ; M.A. 1768; Univer- 
sity librarian, 1783; B.D. 1790. He died, 1817, 
set. seventy-four. C. H. & THOMPSON COOPER. 

Cambridge. 

DETAINING THE PARTING SOUL : A LANCASHIRE 
SUPERSTITION. Can any readers of " N. & Q." 
supply instances illustrating and confirming a 
superstition forming the foundation of a poem in 
Good Words for October, 1862, and mentioned 
as prevalent in Lancashire, to the effect that " a 
person cannot die in the arms of one who strongly 
desires to retain the departing soul ? " Is this a 
tradition peculiar to the north of England, or does 
it occur elsewhere? Is mention made of it in 
any collection of folk lore ? 

C. H. E. CARMICHAEL. 

THE ECCENTRIC SOCIETY. In Joseph Jenkins, 
or Leaves from the Life of a Literary Man, 3 vols., 
London, 1843, the first four chapters of the second 
volume are devoted to " The Eccentric Society." 
After noticing several eminent orators, the author 
says : 



' d S. III. JAN. 24, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



69 



" Both the Sheridans were also ' Eccentrics ;' and few 
of the members, since the establishment, have entered 
with so much spirit into its proceedings as did Richard 
Brinsley Sheridan." ii. 5. 

" The speaking, which used to be heard at their meet- 
ings when ' The Eccentrics,' twenty-five or thirty years 
ago, were in the zenith of their glory, is represented by 
those who -were members at that period, and still live to 
tell the tale, as having surpassed in eloquence, brilliancy, 
and effect, anything they ever elsewhere heard. Among 
the eloquent Eccentrics of the period referred to, there 
was a Mr. Brownley, a reporter on The Times paper, 
whose happiest oratorical efforts are said to have been 
almost superhuman. There must certainly have been 
something very extraordinary in them when Sheridan 
was frequently heard to say : I have heard a great deal 
of excellent public speaking in my time, but I never heard 
anything at all approaching to that of Mr. Brownley.' " 
ii. 7. 

The Eccentric Society was established in 1801. 
Sheridan was then fifty years old. In 1787 he 
made his great speech on the impeachment of 
Warren Hastings ; so he hardly went to the Ec- 
centrics for practice. Did he ever go there ? 
Who was the other Sheridan ? Is any specimen 
of Mr. Brownley's " almost superhuman " oratory 
preserved ? FITZHOPKINS. 

Garrick Club. 

SIR ADRIAN FORTESCUE. Will MR. WIN- 
THROP, the author of the interesting Paper in 
" N. & Q." I 6t S. viii. 1853, on the Knights of 
St. John, or any other correspondent, kindly give 
more particulars of Sir Adrian Fortescue's enrol- 
ment among the saints as a martyr, and especially 
of his portrait said at that time to be in St. John's 
church at Malta? Is it still there, on canvass 
or panel, how is it dressed, and what is the size, 
&c. ? If MR. WINTHROP is right, can there be a 
doubt, as MR. ESTCOURT in " N. & Q." 2 nd S. viii. 
asserts, of Sir Adrian having belonged to the 
order ? Could a copy or drawing of the picture 
be obtained ? KAPPA. 

CAPTAIN SIR HENRY FOWKES commanded 200 
men, part of a levy of 3600 foot, sent to Chester, 
and thence embarked for Dublin and Waterford, 
A.D. 1598. Any information respecting him will 
be acceptable. JAMES KNOWLES. 

FUTIIET, OR FUTHIE. The undersigned is pre- 
paring a genealogy of the Futhey family in Ame- 
rica, and desires information in relation to its early 
history, and of persons of the name, in Great 
Britain and Ireland. The records of the Scottish 
Parliament show, that one Henry Futhie repre- 
i sented Arbroath, Forfarshire, in the second Scot- 
tish Parliament of Charles II., 16691674. 

J. S. FUTHEY. 
West Chester, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

RICHARD GARTHWAITE, son of Philip Garth- 
waite of Dent, in Yorkshire, husbandman, born in 
that place ; and educated for seven years in the 



school there under Mr. Battersby, and then for 
four and a half years in the school at Sedbergh, 
under Mr. Nelson ; was admitted a sizar of St. 
John's College, Cambridge, April 30, 1640, aetat. 
eighteen, proceeding B.A. 1643-4; and being 
created M.A. 1647. He occurs, in 1671, as master 
of St. Mary's Hospital, Newcastle-upon-Tyne ; 
and became head master of the Grammar School 
in that town about Christmas, 1679. He was re- 
moved from this situation March 11, 1690-1. He 
was the author of A Censure upon Lilly's Gram- 
mar, London, 12mo, 1684. Additional informa- 
tion respecting him will be acceptable. 

C. H. & THOMPSON COOPER. 
" THE MERRY JOURNEY." In A Visit to 
the North of Spain, London, 1801, the want of 
books, and the cessation of literature, are much 
dwelt upon. In the chief bookseller's shop at 
Burgos, the author found little more than books 
of devotion, lives of saints, and some poor transla- 
tions from Florian and Marmontel ; low in price, 
but on such bad paper as to be dear at the money. 
He was best pleased with an old book, which he 
says 

" Has not much claim to originality, being an imitation 
of Scarron's Le Roman Comique, and called The Merry 
Journey. More than half is taken up with indifferent 
verses; but there are judicious remarks on the faults of 
actors, their singing tones in speaking, and their redun- 
dant action, which remind us of Hamlet's instructions. 
There is a long catalogue of great events which have 
occurred on Monday, which seems to have been the 
author's favourite day." 

If any one knows the book, its Spanish title, 
and where it can be had or seen, I shall be glad of 
the information. J. B. 

MUFFLED PEAL ON ST. STEPHEN'S DAY. It 
is an old custom in the town of East Dereham, 
Norfolk, to ring a muffled peal from the church 
tower on the morning of St. Stephen's Day. 
Does such a custom prevail elsewhere ? During 
the six winter months the curfew, or eight o'clock 
bell, is rung upon the tenor every evening for 
perhaps five minutes ; the day of the month is 
then sounded from another bell. The evening 
bell has been discontinued several years. 

G. A. C. 

MARGARET FULLER OSSOLI. The Athenceum 
of Feb. 28, 1852, says: 

" We have received permission to state that poor Mar- 
garet Fuller left in the hands of a friend in Lon- 
don, a sealed packet, containing, it is understood, the 

journals she kept during her stay in England 

the deposit of these papers was "accompanied by an in- 
junction that the packet should be restored with 

unbroken seals into her own hands. No provision was of 
course made for death." 

Have these papers been published, or did their 
custodian consider herself bound, even after the 
death of the writer, to keep the seals unbroken ? 
A LORD OF A MANOR. 



70 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 24, '63. 



PHRASES. I am obliged by ESTE'S offer (3 rd S 
i. 118) to look up the case of the finger-burning 
chaplain, but will not trouble him, as I merely 
wished to know the meaning of an expression 
which I had heard but did not understand. 

The phrases, at 3 rd S.^ i. 343, which I feared 
were too vague for insertion, have been satisfac- 
torily answered. I did not suspect them of bein 
connected with so much learning. May I as 
insertion for five more strays, in the hope that 
some one will say what they are, or where they 
come from ? 

" Archduke of torches is the blazing sun." 
" He travels with a pocket fender." 

Does this mean superfluous caution or too 
much luggage ? 

" The sluggish Thomist drinks his slice of wine." 
" Touched by thy pen, conserve to pickle turns." 

" Of sinew and bone he had plenty, 

The graves sounded under his tread : 
Ben saw that his boots were empty, 
And knew that the 'wearer was dead." 

These four lines are all that I remember of a 
ghost-story repeated to me many years ago. 
Where is the story ? And is there any supersti- 
tion attached to empty boots ? E. N. H. 

PORTETJS FAMILY. Any information respect- 
ing the brothers and sisters of Beilby Porteus, 
Bishop of London, or their present representa- 
tives, will greatly oblige : particularly any facts 
relating to his brother Edmund, who was I be- 
lieve a physician. D. M. STEVENS. 

Guildford. 

RAT'S BONES IN SEPULCHRES. In some dis- 
cussions regarding the contents of sepulchral bar- 
rows about fifteen years ago, it was stated that 
bones of rats had been found abundantly along 
with human remains in some of these receptacles. 
From this circumstance the inference was drawn 
that rats were eaten by the British heroes of old 
times, and that regions where such " small deer " 
abounded were preferred by them for their habi- 
tations. 1. Then, are the circumstances to be ad- 
mitted as facts ? 2. Do the conditions in which 
these bones are found exclude the supposition 
that, under almost a universal instinct, the animals 
sought out those recesses that they might die in 
quiet? 3. Has any trustworthy examination 
ascertained the species of rodents to which the 
bones belong ? CONSTANTINE. 

Cape Town, South Africa. 

RITCHIE OP PRESTOUNE, SCOTLAND, 1680. 
An Alexander Ritchie, son of Mr. James, of 
Prestoune, in 1680.' Information wanted re- 
specting them. What county is this Prestoune 
in? 2.0. 

SIGHS AND TEARS THE ATTORNEYS orWiDows. 
In lately searching the Coram Rege Records, I 



found, in the Roll for Michaelmas Term, 5 John, 
(anno 1203) m. 11 dors., an entry to the effect 
that Sigh and Tear (" suspirium et fletus "), the 
attorney of Rohesia Pecche, appeared and ob- 
tained a writ, &c. In his abstract of this entry, 
Mr. Agarde explains that the attorneys of widows 
were styled u Sighs and Tears." This, however, 
being the only instance I have met with of attorneys 
being so designated, I should be glad if your 
learned readers would favour me with other in- 
stances, or with any information on this point ? 

H. S. SWEETMAN. 

OLD TRADITION : TRENT RIVER. Can any one 
refer me to the authority upon which a writer in 
The Times of Jan. 5, 1863, states that the direc- 
tion of the march of the rebel army, in 1745,. 
through England to Derby, was selected in ac- 
cordance with some old tradition ? 

In another sentence the same writer speaks of 
the mysterious boundary of the Trent, beyond 
which it was formerly customary to allow fourteen 
days longer to run to royal writs, and other pro- 
cesses of law. I should very much wish to be re- 
ferred to the authority for this also. C. J. 



font!) 

THE CENCI. There is a large picture in the 
Crystal Palace, painted by one Mr. Reilly of Rome- 
(I think), representing Guido taking the portrait 
of the Cenci the night before her execution. Now 
I want to ask some of your readers where I can 
find the best history of this event, and of the 
Cenci family altogether ; for all I have yet seen 
differ so much in the details. A SUBSCRIBER. 

[In the second volume of Melanges publics par la Socie.te 
des Bibliophiles Franpais, Paris, 8vo, 1822, is a narrative- 
of this terrible tragedy in French and Italian, entitled 
" Relation de la Mort de Giacomo et de Beatrix Cenci, et 
de Lucrece Petroni, leur Belle-Mere; arrive'e a. Rome, 
sous le pontificat de Ctement VIII., le 11 Septembre, 
1599." Consult also the Biographic Universelle, nouvellft 
edition, 1844, for a long account of this melancholy event. 
In Bentley's Miscellany for August, 1847, there is a paper 
entitled " Beatrice Cenci," by Mr. Whittle. This gentle- 
man professes to give the true history of the parricide, 
and says " Excited by a repeated study of the picture, I 
sought in all the libraries of Rome for some authentic 
account of her life, but in vain ; the publication of her 
"listory is prohibited, and, although the outline of it is 
iniversally known, no satisfactory and authentic particu- 
ars have/I believe, ever been published." The Rt. Hon. 
James Whiteside, during his travels, was however more 
brtunate, for he picked up at Florence a tract entitled 
Beatrice, Cenci Romana, Storia del Secolo XVI., Raccon- 
'ata dal D. A. A., Firenze. By A. A. is meant Agostino- 
\demollo, a writer on the laws of Tuscany. A frontis- 
)iece represents Beatrice ascending the scaffold. An 
Soglish version of this tract, entitled " The True Story 
of Beatrice Cenci," will be found in Mr. Whiteside's 
Italy in the Nineteenth Century, ii. 129-172, ed. 1848. 
The fearful narrative of the Cenci afforded scope for the 
jenius of Shelley, and he has accordingly moulded it 



3" S. III. JAN. 24, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



71 



into a tragedy of remarkable ability and vigour. Se 
Shelley's Poetical Works, ed. 1839, vol. ii. pp. 141-280.] 

MRS. INCHBALD'S DR. WARREN. In Kava 

nagh's English Women of Letters, vol. ii. p. 17 
mention is made of the beautiful novelist's roman 
tic attachment for Dr. Warren, a physician, \vh 
resided in Sackville Street, and died in 1797. 
shall be obliged by any correspondent telling m 
where I can find any biographical particulars o 
the doctor and his family, especially his parents. 

BURIENSIS. 

[Richard Warren, M.D. was born on the 13th Decem 
ber, 1731, and was the third son of the Rev. Richan 
Warren, D.D., archdeacon of Suffolk, and rector of Caven 
dish, a divine of great eminence, and an accomplishec 
scholar. The younger Warren was educated at the 
grammar school of Bury St. Edmunds, removed in 1748 
to Jesus College, Cambridge, of which house he became a 
Fellow. He proceeded A.B. 1752, and was fifth wrangler ; 
proceeded A.M. 1755, M.D. 3rd July, 1762; was ad- 
mitted a candidate of the College of Physicians 30th 
Sept. 1762; and a Fellow 3rd March, 1763. Dr. War- 
ren's progress as a physician was unusually rapid ; and 
he is said to have realised 9000/. a-year from the time oi 
the regency, and to have bequeathed to his family above 
150.000/. He died at his house in Dover Street", Picca- 
dilly on the 22nd June, 1797, and was buried at Kensing- 
ton church, where there is a tablet to his memory. Vide 
Munk's Roll of the Royal College of Physicians, ii. 203-207 ; 
and Gent. Mag. vol. Ixvii. Pt. n. pp. 616, 656.] 

BUCKHORSE, THE PUGILIST. References to con- 
temporary notices of his lordship will oblige 

DELTA. 

[Christopher Anstey published anonymously an amus- 
ing poetical piece entitled The Patriot : a Pindaric Ad- 
dress to Lord Buckkorse, with an Appendix, 4to, 1767, 
1768; but for biographical notices of John Smith, alias 
Buckhorse, consult Wilson's Wonderful Characters, iii. 
214, with his portrait; Pierce Egan's Boxiana, i. 34-37; 
but especially Peter Moser's account of him in the Euro- 
pean Magazine, xlvi. 249-254. Crowder published in 
1756 Memoirs (,fthe noted Buckhorse, 2 vols. 12mo, an- 
nounced in the Gent. Mag. xxvi. 501 ; but probably this 
work was merely a vehicle of humour or of political 
satire. John Taylor, in Records of my Life, i. 184, says, 
"I remember to have seen Buckhorse towards the end of 
his life, when he was a poor decrepid creature. He had 
only one eye, but I suppose he had lost the other in early 
life, for there is a print from a picture by a painter of 
that time, named Collins, representing two females fight- 
ing, and Buckhorse appears to be taking part in the 
contest, and seems to have been a stout man." Buck- 
horse's memory is still preserved at Westminster School, 
m the phrases, " I'll Buckhorse you," or I'll give vou a 
.buckhorse ! "] 



KNUCKLE-DUSTER. Is the slang word Knuckle- 
duster of Romance extraction, that is, as to the 
latter portion ? And is this (duster) related to 
the Persian dast, the hand? G O W 



(<>*?) used by boxers. The cestus originally consisted 
of nothing more formidable than thongs of ox-hide. But 
in later times "it was frequently covered with knots and 
nails, and loaded with lead and iron." (Smith, Diet, of 
Antiq. art. " Cestus.") To this corresponds the modern 
Knuckle-duster.] 

LAST PRIOR OF CARLISLE. Can you inform 
me who was the last Prior of Carlisle, and whe- 
ther he embraced the reformed religion, or died 
in the Roman Catholic faith ? SOL WAY. 

[Lancelot Salkeld was the last prior of Carlisle. He 
was a member of the right worshipful family of that 
name settled at Corby near Carlisle. On the 9th of 
January, 1538, he resigned the priory into the King's 
hands, with all it's lands, revenues, and possessions, to be 
disposed of at his majesty's pleasure. He was appointed 
the first dean of the new foundation, which he enjoyed 
during the reign of Henry VIII., but in the beginning of 
that of Edward VI., was deprived ; restored in that of 
Queen Mary (1553); but the second time deprived in 
1559, soon after the accession of Queen Elizabeth. It 
would appear from these changes that he did not fully 
embrace the Reformed Faith.] 

LENG'S ARISTOPHANES. There is an edition 
of the Nubes and Plutus of Aristophanes, by Leng, 
1695, Latin and Greek. Is this Latin version an 
original translation by the editor ? R. INGLIS. 

[The editor claims it as an original translation in his- 
Preface. He says, "Textum ipsum Aristophanis ad 
fidem optimarum editionum emendatum dedimus. Cui 
novam versionem latinam addidimus in qua id pra;cipue 
agitur ut mens Poeta3 quam fidelissime exprimatur: a 
qua Nic. Frischlini interpretatio (dum senarios affecta- 
vit) paulo longius aliquando recesserat."] 

REV. JOSEPH COLLET published in Aug. 1742 
(Gent. Mag. xii. 448), a sermon on The Mysteries, 
of the Divine Providence. I wish to ascertain 
what preferment he held, from whom he was de- 
scended, to whom he was married, and whether 
ie left any descendants ? In fact, any particulars 
relating to him and his family that may be in the 
possession of any of your correspondents will be 
r ery acceptable. ST. Liz. 

[Mr. Collet was born at Longborough, co. Gloucester, 
nd became pasfor of a meeting-house at Coat, co. Ox- 
ord. He died on August 21, 1741, in the fifty-seventh 
ear of his age, and his Funeral Sermon, preached by 
oseph Stennett, was published in 1742, 8vo. This Sermon, 
owever, does not contain any biographical particulars of 
lr. Collet or of his family.] 

LITTLE HORNED PARLIAMENT. In Blomfield's 
Norfolk, fol. i. p. 103, in a note at bottom, men- 
tion is made of the Little Horned Parliament, 
in connection with the appointment of parochial 
registers. Whence the name of Little Horned ? 

G. O. L. 

[The Act appointing Parochial Registers was passed on 



i +V, TT 11 j i L "- tfiyuiui.iJtj -L aiuv^ujai jLicgiaiGia was uasseu oil 

Ii the Knuckle-duster has occasionally ap- August 24, 1653, by what is called the Little Parliament, 



U 

" 



dnr 
"111 



-T ^P * 8 ' and e ''n L<m- 
f co " SI(Je . redl t an American "institu- 
S ^ mencan - ." Duster >" we would 
m connectlon with the verb to 
S T n / e f be f ing> as in the P hrase 



or derisively Barebone's Parliament. The pious newly- 
appointed registrar, when he made his first entry, no 
doubt looked upon this Puritan Convention of the Nota- 
bles," as Thomas Carlvle terms it, as the little horn " of 
Daniel ' s vision > " befo " re whom t fter were three of the 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3* S. IIL JAN. 24, '63. 



JOHN HAMPDEX. 
(1 st S. viii. 495, 640 ; 3 rd S. iii. 11, 41.) 

The following statements may throw some light 
on this hotly canvassed question. Mr. Robert- 
son's communications were made, in the first in- 
stance, viva voce, to the sight-seers who visited 
Hampden House ; and various particulars and 
explanations have been written by him at different 
times, which have been carefully embodied in the 
following account. Mr. Robertson says : 

" I came to Hampden from Scotland, in 1822, as prin- 
cipal gardener to Thos. Viscount Hampden ; and I lived 
there, in the same situation, until the death of the late 
Earl of Buckinghamshire in 1849. I have no interest or 
wish to say anything but the truth respecting the exhu- 
mation. I stood by the coffin, an eye-witness of all the 
proceedings. As soon as the lead coffin was cut open by 
the plumber, Thos. Hailey, Lord Nugent stepped down 
into the grave to examine the bod}'. I made the ob- 
servation: My Lord, is there no surgeon present?' as 
there were several gentlemen whom I did not know. 
They all seemed confounded at my question, and acknow- 
ledged that one ought to have been there. Mr. Brooks, 
the then clergyman of Hampden, asked me to despatch a 
messenger to his house he expected Mr. Norris, of 
Prince's Risborough, would be there which I did; but 
he, Mr. Norris, was gone. The coffin was lifted out of 
the grave, and placed upon the bier. They then cut the 
body about as they thought proper, and left it so for Mr. 
Norris's inspection. The body was left, propped up with 
a shovel, until the following day. The face, breast, and 
fleshy part of the arms, were perfectly entire, with the 
exception of the gristly part of the nose, that had given 
way owing (perhaps) to the pressure of the cerecloth. He 
appeared to be a strong built man, about five feet eight 
or nine inches high ; -with a fine mouth of teeth, and a 
beautiful head of hair, tied in a cue, and brought over 
his head, and fastened with a piece of black ribbon. The 
hair came all off, in the form of a wig. The flesh was of 
a yellowish brown. The right hand of the corpse was 
not in a separate cloth, but had dropt off from the 
wrist ; and all the little bones of the fingers were ly- 
ing in the cerecloth, with no flesh attached to them, 
nor nearly up to the elbow all was perfectly bare. 
Three folds of cerecloth were tightly wrapped round. 
I have often thought it very possible that the patriot 
died from the bursting of his own pistol, as the right 
hand was found in this state. Mr. Norris, and his son, 
Mr. Wm. Norris, came about two o'clock the following 
day (22nd July), and I was present when they made 
their inspection of the body. The arms had been taken 
off by Martin, the parish clerk, with his own pen-knife. 
Mr. Norris was very indignant indeed at his not being 
called at the proper time, and at the manner in which 
the body had been treated. From the way the hair was 
tied up, some people thought the corpse a woman's. I 
mentioned this incident to Mr. Norris, when Mr. Wm. 
Norris took a rule and measured some part of the body, 
and pronounced him a man." 

As both the surgeons who examined the body 
are now dead, the following statement may be of 
some value. It was given by Mrs. Norris, widow 
of Mr. Norris, and mother of the late Mr. Wm. 
Norris, surgeons of Prince's Risborough : 



" Mrs. Norris can attest that neither her husband nor 
her son was present at the exhumation by Lord Nugent of 
the body, supposed to be that of John Hampden. They 
both examined the body the middle of the next day, and 
they found no trace of any injury to the hand, or the 
shoulder ; therefore Mr. Norris and his son were always 
of opinion that it was not the body of John Hampden, 
but they never doubted that the remains they examined 
were those of a man. 

' Mrs. Norris never heard that her husband received 
any directions from Lord Buckinghamshire to attend the 
exhumation ; but the next day he was requested to exa- 
mine the body by some person connected, Mrs. Norris 
believes, with the establishment of the late Earl, though 
she has forgotten the name of the person who. made the 
request." 

The following memorandum is given by the 
Rev. Oliver James Grace, son of the late Mr. 
Grace (landsteward to the late Earl of Bucking- 
hamshire), who was present in Hampden church 
when Lord Nugent disinterred the body in ques- 
tion : 

" Lacey Green, Jan. 12, 1863. 

" I have frequently heard my father speak of the ex- 
humation of the body supposed to be that of John Hamp- 
den. He noticed particularly the perfect preservation of 
the features (with the exception of the nose), when the 
body was first exhumed, and the rapid change which 
came over them after it had been a short time exposed 
to the air ; this was visible while he was in the church. 
I have often heard him say that the eyebrows were per- 
fect, and the expression of the face quite to be discerned. 
He thought it a beautiful dead face. He had not any 
doubt about the body being that of a man." 

An eminent surgeon, now surviving, who held 
some conversation with Mr. Norris on the exhu- 
mation, states, that professional gentleman never 
hinted to him a doubt as to the masculine sex of 
the body ; however, it became a popular and 
abiding joke in the neighbourhood, that " my 
Lord had dug up the remains of an old lady;" 
and when, as Mr. Forster says,* the " persuasion 
came to be held by Lord Nugent " that the body 
was not Hampderi's, his lordship, with considerable 
tact, took the jest out of the mouth of his adver- 
saries. 

The entry of Hampden's burial, in the Register 
of the parish of Great Hampden, is certainly an 
interpolation ; but the entries which precede and 
follow it are in the same handwriting, and that is 
the handwriting of Robert Lenthall, the contem- 
porary of John Hampden, and his country neigh- 
bour, as vicar of the adjoining parish of Great 
Missenden. Lenthall succeeded Spurstowe in the 
rectory of Great Hampden in 1643. 

Is it likely, when his party was so soon vic- 
torious, that this great and beloved chief would 
be left to moulder in a strange grave, within a 
dozen miles of the residence and burial-place of 
his father ? Would not some of those 4000 free- 
holders who rode up with the Buckinghamshire 
petition see that Hampden was carried home ? And 

* Forster's Memoir of Lord Nugent. 



3<iS.iIU. JAN. 24, '63*1 



NOTES AND QUEBIES. 



73 



where should they lay him but by the side of his 
beloved first wife? Owing to the manner in 
which the disinterment was managed, the identity 
of the body exhumed must always remain an open 

rjstion. The reader who wishes to understand 
subject thoroughly should refer to the Gen- 
tleman's Magazine for August 1828; Mr. Forster's 
" Memoir of Lord Nugent," attached to an edi- 
tion of The Memorials of Hampden, and the pages 
of " N. & Q-" AN OLD CONTRIBUTOR. 

In the Annual Register for the year 1828, " Chro- 
nicle," p. 93, is an account of the disinterment of 
the body of Hampden in that year, " given to the 
public by one of the party." In some passages it 
is in such verbal accordance with the narrative 
given by MR. J. W. SMITH in " N. & Q.," as to 
lead to the supposition that both have some com- 
munity of origin ; but in the material passages the 
two narratives differ widely, or are in direct oppo- 
, sition. I have inclosed you a copy of that printed 
in the 'Annual Register. The chiefest points of 
difference are three, and it appears desirable that 
the facts should be settled by a strict sifting of 
the evidence. 

In the Annual Register narrative it is stated 
that the right arm presented such an appearance 
as to suggest amputation, inasmuch as " the lobe 
presented a perfectly flat appearance as if sawn 
off by some sharp instrument." MR. SMITH says, 
" the two bones of the (right) fore-arm, for about 
three inches above the wrist, were without flesh 
or skin, but there were no marks of amputation." 
With regard to the injury to the shoulders, the 
Annual Register says, 

" The socket of the left arm was perfectly white and 
healthy, and the clavicle firmly united to the scapula, 
nor was there the least appearance of contusion or wound. 
The socket of the right shoulder, on the contrary, was of 
a brownish cast, and the clavicle being found quite loose, 
and disunited from the scapula, proved that dislocation 
had taken place." 

MR. SMITH says, 

" The shoulders and arms were then carefully inspected. 
.... There did not appear any discolouration, or the 
slightest injury to the shoulders or arms." 

In the Annual Register it is stated that " a little 
beard remained on the lower part of the chin, and 
the whiskers were strong, and somewhat lighter 
than his hair." MR. SMITH says, " the beard had 
been shaven, but there appeared a growth of 
about a sixteenth of an inch." There is a slight 
discrepancy as to the beard ; but MR. SMITH 
omits any mention of the whiskers. If it can be 
substantiated that whiskers were really seen upon 
the face, it would settle the suggestion as to the 
corpse exhumed being really that of a female. 

The variation in the two accounts in reference 
to the position of the coffin and the condition of 



the plate is not material. The two narrators are 
clearly speaking of the same thing. 

It is not stated whence the narrative of the An- 
nual Register is derived, but I have no doubt that 
it is a reprint of some contemporary publication. 

THOS. HANSARD. 

Temple. 

HEIRESS'S SON. 
(3 rd S. iii. 19.) 

The doctrine advanced by S. T., in the last 
paragraph of his observations on F. L. B. D.'s 
communication, is quite contrary to the received 
notions of heraldic law ; and if generally adopted, 
would lead to endless confusion. For instance, 
A may have six brothers who all have male issue ; 
but A himself has an only daughter and heiress, 
whose son would (provided he had no paternal 
coat), according to S. T.'s theory, bear the same 
arms as his relatives of a different surname and 
family, merely because he is the representative of 
A. Even supposing the right limited to the de- 
scendants of an heiress, who is the sole represen- 
tative in blood of her family, who has neither 
uncle, aunt, nor cousin of her name (besides the 
anomaly of Mr. Brown, for instance, bearing the 
arms of Smith), it must be remembered that there 
are many families of the same name bearing the 
same arms though not known to be related, the 
fact of the same arms being borne being perhaps 
the only proof of community of origin ; but un- 
fortunately the modern practice of sending " name 
and county " to some of the numerous arms finders 
for the million weakens the force of this argu- 
ment ; and whatever may be the proper way to 
" manage these things," I would sooner see Mr. 
Brown heraldically garbed in the coat of his 
grandfather Mr. Smith, than that he should adorn 
the panels of his chariot with the time-honoured 
bearings of the house of Kilmaine or Sligo : to 
which he has no more right than he has to those 
noblemen's family estates, which would very pro- 
bably be assigned to him by the " authorities " in 
question. 

But the fact is, that a person not being an ar- 
miger by descent, has no nobility of blood ; and 
ergo, has no right to bear arms until he is made 
gentle by a grant, when he is in a position to quar- 
ter the arms of his mother and transmit them to 
his posterity. 

In the supposed case cited, however (but this 
is a point upon which I by no means insist), if 
Mr. Brown's daughter and heiress marry an ar- 
miger, I conceive that her issue by such armiger 
would be entitled to quarter the arms of Smith, 
although Mr. Brown had no arms ; because the 
same objection could not here apply, the issue 
being paternally gentle, and the Smith arms would 
then be called out of abeyance. 



74 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAN. 24, '63. 



That "auncient Herehaught," Gerard Legh, whose 
work abounds with fanciful conceits, states that 
the son of a gentlewoman, married to one having no 
coat armour, may during his life bear his mother's 
coat " with a difference cynquefoyle ;" but I do 
not believe a single instance of a coat so borne 
can be adduced; and this "laced coat," as he 
punningly (?) styles it, evidently had its origin in 
Mr. Gerard's own maggotty noddle. An authority 
cited by a correspondent, in l t S. x. 32, viz. that 
of Glover from a MS. in the College of Arms, and 
which I may add is printed in Dallaway, must be 
considered decisive : 

" If an inheritrix," he says, " marrie a man that 
bearith no arraes, her issue by that husband shall not 
bear the mother's father's armes," &c. 

H. S. G. 



YORKSHIRE SUFFERERS IX 1746. 
(3 rd S. ii. 450.) 

The following lists are extracted from the con- 
temporary weekly numbers of The Norwich Mer- 
cury, and are professedly given in that paper on 
the trustworthy authority of the numbers of The 
York Courant, of the several dates immediately 
succeeding those to which the events refer. The 
names are here set down as I find them spelt in 
the above publications. 

" Executed at York, Nov. 1, 1746 George Hamilton, 

Captain of Hussars ; Edward Clavering, a gentleman of 
Northumberland; Daniel Frazier, a Highlander, who 
had deserted from Lord Loudon; William Conolly, an 
Irishman, of the Duke of Perth's reg., who had deserted 
from the Welsh Fusileers ; James Sparks, a Derbyshire 
man, of Townley's reg. ; Charles Gordon, of Glenbucket's 
reg.; Angus M'Donald, of M'Donald's reg.; James 
Mayne, of Grant's reg. ; Benjamin Mason, an Irishman, 
of Glenbuchet's reg. ; and William Dempsey, an Irish- 
man, of Townley's reg. 

" Two Hearses were ready to receive the bodies of 
Capt. Hamilton, Clavering, and Gordon ; and coffins for 
the rest. The heads of Conolly and Mayne were set up 
at Micklegate-Bar; Hamilton's was put into a box, in 
order to be sent to Carlisle ; but the rest were put into 
the coffins with their bodies ; and they were all buried 
behind the Castle. Four of them only were Roman 
Catholics. 

"Executed at York, Nov. 8, 1746. David Row, a 
volunteer, had been an officer in the Customs, and was 
taken at Clifton ; William Hunter, of Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne, a Roman Catholic, of Townley's reg. ; John Ends- 
worth, a Roman Catholic of Knottesford, Cheshire, of 
Grant's reg. ; John M'Clean, a Highlander of Perthshire, of 
the Duke of Perth's reg. ; John M'Greggor, of Perthshire, 
of the Duke of Perth's reg. ; Simon M'Kensie, of Inverness, 
2 c! Uart - 8 reg - ; Alexander Parker, of the shire of Murray, 
J part's reg. ; Thomas M'Gennis, of the Shire of Bamff, 
of Glenbucket's reg. ; Archibald Kennedy, of the Shire 
of Air, servant to Col. Grant, of Glenbucket's reg. ; James 
Ihompson, of Lord Ogilvie's reg.; and Michael Brady, 
an Irishman, of Glengarry's reg. 

" Reprieved John James Jellins (on his way to the 
gallows), William Crosby, William Barclay, Sir David 



Murray, Charles Robinson, James M'Colley, David Ogil- 
vy, Gilbert Barcloy, Peter Campbell, John Gaddes, John 
Walker, Matthew Matthews, George Mills alias Miller, 
Alexander M'Clean, John Beaton, John Cruikshanks', 
John Duncan, John Barclet, John Flint, John Porteous' 
Alexander Steel, Robert Stuart, William Stephens, Alex- 
ander Nichols, Archibald Payton, John Barnagey, James 
M'Lauchlan, John M'Lauchlan, William Grantj George 
Boyd, Peter Hay, John Scott, James Creighton, Peter 
M'Donald, Alexander Goodbrand, John M'Quin, James 
Wishart, David Webster, William Farrier, Duncan Stuart 
William Scott, David Wilkie, William Smith, James 
Webster, William Hay, Angus Campbell, Alexander 
Scott, and Daniel Duff. 

"Executed at York, Nov. 15, 1746. James Reid." 
WM. MATTHEWS. 

Cowgill. 



SAMUEL ROWE. 
(3 rd S. ii. 459.) 

The name of Roo and Roe occur as landowners- 
at Cheddar, Somerset, at an early date, but whe- 
ther they were in any way connected with the ; 
ancestors of Samuel Rowe I cannot undertake to I 
say. I find in Collinson's Hist. Som., vol. iii. i 
pp.576, 577, that the manor of Chedder-Fitzwalter 
was owned by Henry Roo, or Roe, 7 Edw. IV. t 
and who then resided there. He was, as Collin- 
son states, ^ progenitor of all the Roes of this 
place." It is further said that the manor, by 
an heiress, came to the family of Tilliam, who sold 
it to a Mr. Birch, from whom it descended to a 
Mrs. Stagg, the then (1791) owner. In Chedder 
church there is a small chapel adjoining the south 
aisle, which was claimed by Mrs. Stagg, as owner 
of the manor and mansion formerly held by the 
Roes, and in the east window of this chapel (as I 
learn from Collinson) 

" Are several shields of arms ; viz., 1, azure, a roebuck 
lodged argent, Roe, impaling a chevron ermine between 
three leaves vert. 2, Roe impaling argent, a chevron 
sable between three annulets gules. In the south window i 
1, Roe ; 2, vert a cross flory argent ; in the dexter chief 
a garb or, over it a mitre. 3, I. S. interwoven, and sur- 
mounted by a mitre, for Bishop John Still. 4, Chedder, 
impaling argent three fleurs-de-lis or, surmounted by a 
pile of three points azure. On a stone tomb in the chapel : 
Here b'eth the body of Edmund Rooe, Esq., who de- 
parted this life the 27th of March, A. D. 1595.' Arms, 
1 and 4, Roe, 2 gules a chevron ermine between three 
leaves vert. 3, A heart between hands and feet. 5, Ar- 
gent a chevron sable between three annulets gules." 

From an original deed of settlement, dated 
May 10, 15 James L, between Edward Lancaster 
of Milverton, Somerset, gent., of the first part ; 
John Lancaster, gent, son and heir apparent of 
said Edward Lancaster and Dorothy his wife, 
daughter of Henry Whittington, gent., deceased, of 
the second part ; John Colles of Wiveliscombe, 
Somerset, Esq., Roger Bowrne, of same place, 
gent. ; Andrew Whittington of Clifton, Glouces- 
tershire, gent., and William Richars, senr., of Mil- 
verton, gent., of the third part, it appears that the 



3'* S. III. JAN. 24, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



75 



manor of " Chedder-Fitzwaters," and the manor- 
bouse, demesne lands in Chedder, " w'ch some 
time were the inheritaunce, or in the seizin or 
possession of Edmonde Roe, gent., deceased," were 
then " in the seizin or possession " of said Edward 
Lancaster. This manor, manor-house, &c., and 
other property in Cheddar, Batcombe, Wynforde, 
Tarnocke, Wedmore, Allerton, Westbury, Wokey, 
East Brent, Butcombe, Draycot, and Glastonbury, 
formerly the inheritance of said Edmonde Roe, 
were, with other extensive estates in Somerset 
(except those in Trent, Milborn Port, and Kings- 
bury Regis, 'other than the patronage of the 
church of Trent), settled on said John Lancaster 
and his issue. It thus appears that the Roes of 
Chedder must have been a wealthy and respect- 
able family. 

By what means the estates of the Roes came to 
the Lahcasters I cannot say, as the deed of settle- 
ment I have just now quoted does not give me 
the requisite information. 

The name of Roo also occurs at Shepton Mallet. 
The following is a copy of the will of one of them : 
" In dei nomine, the year of our lord 1540, vij day of 
February, make this my testament, I Robert Eoo, in this 
naan'r followyng : Fyrst, I bequeathe my sowle to al- 
roighty gd my body to be buryd yn the churchyeard of 
Shepton Mallet. Item, I bequethe to the crosse lyght 
ij*. It'm, to Saynt Androwys iij d . It'm, to the bellys 
iiij d . The resydew of my goods, movable and vnmovable, 
not bequethyd, I geve to Agnes my wyff, whom I make 
ray sole executrix. VVytnys Rychard Stayn'r, John Ar- 
gwynt, and Robert Hannam." 

There is an old family named Roe resident at 
Glastonbury and West Pennard, where they have 
been located between one and two centuries. 

INA. 

Wells, Somerset. 



PRINTED WILLS (3 rd S. iii. 30.) To the lists of 
printed wills which have already appeared in 
" N. & Q.," it may be well to add the will of 
Richard, seventh Viscount Fitzwilliam of Mer- 
rion, who died in London, February 4, 1816. His 
will may be found in Act 3 and 4 Wm. IV. c. 26 
(Local and Personal Statutes), and likewise in 
Act 5 and 6 Viet. c. 23 ; and under it the present 
Earl of Pembroke has inherited the large and 
valuable " Fitzwilliam estates." ABHBA. 

Walter de Merton, Bp. of Rochester ; Simon de 
Langbam, Cardinal ; John Gower, poet ; Bp. de 
Beckington; Bp. Lyndewode; Rob. Fisher of Be- 
verley (father of the Bp. of Rochester) ; Sir Ralph 
Verney, Aid. of London; Bp. Waynflete ; Abp. 
Dene ; John Writhe, Garter ; John Grey, second 
Viscount Lisle; Kath. Courtenay, Countess of 
Devon ; Queen Catharine of Arragon ; Humphrey 
Monmouth, Aid. of London; Andrew Borde 
M.D. ; Thomas Wriothesley, Earl of Southamp- 



ton ; Sir Rob. Rochester; Sir William Fairfax 
(1557-8) ; Sir Tho. Cawarden ; Sir Ric. Clough ; 
Walter Devereux, Earl of Essex ; Bp. Fletcher ; 
Francis Beaumont, Justice of C. P. ; John Napier 
of Merchistoun ; Thomas first Lord Fairfax ; Sir 
Robert Hitcham, King's Serjeant; Bp. Dee; 
Abp. Spottiswood; Ferdinando Lord Fairfax; 
Arthur Wilson the historian ; Humphrey Chet- 
ham ; David Calderwood ; Sir Will. Savile, Bart.; 
Sir William Penn; Anne, Countess of Dorset, 
Pembroke, and Montgomery ; Edward Hyde, 
Earl of Clarendon ; Lady Fanshawe ; Sir Will. 
Temple ; King Will. III. ; Bp. Patrick ; Richard 
Cromwell; Thomas Hearne; Dean Swift; Dr. 
Bentley ; Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough ; But- 
ler, Bp. of Durham; Peter Thelluson ; Bp. Por- 
teus ; Lord Byron ; Jebb, Bishop of Limerick ; 
Tho. Telford ; Sir Rob. Peel (codicil) ; and Dan. 
W T ilson, Bp. of Calcutta. C. H. COOPEE. 

Cambridge. 

PEERAGE FORFEITED (3 rd S.' iii. 8.) On re- 
ference to Burke's St. James's Magazine, 1850 
(334), also to Burke's Extinct and Nicolas's Sy- 
nopsis of the Peerage, C. J. will find that George 
Nevill, the eldest son of the Marquis of Montagu, 
and nephew of Richard, Earl of Warwick and 
Salisbury, which George was created Duke of 
Bedford, 1469, by Edward IV. was degraded by 
Parliament, 1477, from the assigned cause of 
poverty ; poverty produced by the many attain- 
ders of his noble and illustrious house. 

D. D. H. 

Anciently a writ of summons to Parliament 
might be omitted where the person summoned, or 
his descendant, had not a sufficient estate to 
support the dignity of a peer. Thus William, 
the second Lord Say and Seal, grew necessitated 
to mortgage the greatest part of his lands, and so 
afterwards the barony became extinct. (Cruise 
on Dignities, 76, s. 29, citing Dugd. Bar. v. ii. 
264.) 

In the Earl of Shrewsbury's case, 12 Coke R. 
105, it is laid down that, although one may have 
a dignity without any possessions ad sustinendum 
nomen et onus, yet it is very inconvenient that 
dignity should be clothed with poverty, and in 
cases of writs and such other legal proceedings, he 
s accounted in law a nobleman, and so ought 
to be called in respect of his dignity ; yet, if he 
wants possessions to maintain his estates, he 
cannot press the king in justice to grant him a 
writ to call him to the parliament ; and so it was 
resolved in the case of the Lord Ogle in the 
reign of Edw. VI., as Lord Burleigh at the Par- 
" lament 35 Eliz. did report. And in the same 
case it was held that, although a peer had not 
any possessions to support his dignity, yet his 
dignity could not be taken from him without an 
act of parliament. 



76 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 24, '63. 



By an act of parliament, 17 Edw. IV., reciting 
that the king had made George Nevill Duke of 
Bedford, and that it was openly known that he 
had not, nor by inheritance might have, any live- 
lihood to support the name, estate, and dignity of 
Duke of Bedford, and that it was seen that when 
any lord had not livelihood to support his dignity, 
it oftentimes caused great extortion, embracery, 
and maintenance; wherefore the king, by the 
advice of the lords spiritual, &c., ordained that 
the making of the said Duke, and all the names 
of dignity to him, or to his father, should be 
void. (Cruise Dign. 126, citing Rot. Parl. v. 6, 
173.) 

I have given the references in order that C. J. 
may consult the originals, if he pleases so to do. 

C. S. GEKAVES. 

DR. RICHARD KINGSTON (3 rd S. ii. 470.) In a 
Catalogue of Manuscripts, issued by Thomas 
Thorpe in 1834, is the following document relating 
to this individual, whose orders and academical 
degrees appear rather dubious. It is thus de- 
scribed : 

"Lot 468. Petition of Richard Kingston, addressed to 
Mr. Brathwayte [Clerk to the Privy Council], urging his 
interest to obtain Kingston the arrears of his Pension, 
being about 600Z., A.D. 1699. 

" This Petition sets forth his services in the cause of 
King William III. ; his having been a witness in the 
conviction ^f three several traitors; his bringing into 
the Treasury 1225Z. by a seizure of French silks ; his 
printing thirteen books on the Government's behalf at 
his own charge; having a hundred pounds' worth of 
books and other goods taken from him for the payment of 
the King's tax upon his pension, which he has not re- 
ceived ; his being aged sixty-four, having nine children, 
and in extreme poverty ; will be inevitably ruined unless 
speedily supplied by His Majesty's goodness. 

"With these papers are three letters, wholly auto- 
graph, of Lord Lucas, Governor of the Tower of London, 
imploring Brathwayte's good offices 'in behalf of the 

rr gentleman, Dr. Kingston, that if not helped speedily, 
and his numerous family must perish for want: a 
hard case, that after nine years' service he should starve.' 
The letters also show that this pension had been antece- 
dently paid by Lord Lucas as secret service money." 

J. YEOWELL. 

OIL WELLS (3 rd S. iii. 24.) On the subject of 
" Oil Wells " I quote as follows from Maitland's 
History of Edinburgh, p. 507 : 

" About a mile to the eastward of those (the Pent- 
land) Hills lies a small village denominated St. Cathe- 
rine's, or the Kaims, at which is a spring called the Oily 
Wd^ from an unctuous substance wherewith it is covered, 
said to be good for scorbutical disorders." 

This well still exists (between two and three 
miles south of Edinburgh), and though a century 
and more has run since Maitland wrote, the same 
species of unctuous matter continues to cover its 
surface. Its water has, however, I understand, 
long ceased to be used medicinally. T. 

ORDER OF ST. JOHN OF JERUSALEM (3 rd S. iii. 8, 
39.) Surely your last correspondent does not 



wish us to believe that the present so-called Order, 
and the present so-called Order of Knights Tem- 
plars, have any connection with the mediaeval 
orders of the same name, further than the name ? 
The present Orders are surely only offshoots of 
the Freemasons' Society, and established for the j 
gratification of personal vanities and display. 
Should he really mean that there is a legitimate 
connection by descent, in each case, no doubt 
your readers would be glad to have the state- 
ments. W. P. 

I have a roll of the Knights of St. John of the 
Langue of England, which is very much at the 
CONSTANT READER'S service, although from the 
mode in which it came into my possession, I 
entertain considerable doubts as to whether it 
contains much that is authentic touching " the 
present state' and position" of the Order. The 
pages in question were discovered amongst the 
papers used by a London publishing firm (that of 
Hardwicke I think) for packing books to forward 
into the country. From this circumstance, and 
from the fact of the roll not recording any ap- 
pointment of later date than 1855, I fear that my 
preferred gift is of little or no value, and it is 
more than possible that I am performing a useless 
act in writing on this subject, unless a final sug- 
gestion that the CONSTANT READER should apply 
to Mr. Hardwicke, 192, Piccadilly, for the in- 
formation he requires, be productive of any good 
effect. ST. SWITHIN. 

The English langue of this Order, about 
which A CONSTANT READER inquires, is not part 
of the Order of Knights Templars, and has not 
the slightest connection with the Masonic grade 
styling itself by the same name. 

The English langue is an acknowledged branch 
of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, which has 
existed for more than seven centuries ; and been 
settled in the Holy Land, in Rhodes, and in 
Malta. The head of the Order in England is his 
Grace the Duke of Manchester, Grand Prior of 
England, and President of the Capitular Com- 
mission. JOHN WOODWARD. 

DIMINUTIVE CROSS-LEGGED FIGURES (3 rd S. iii. 
26.) I have no very definite information to give 
respecting this very remarkable class of effigies, 
though my conviction has long been, that they 
were probably not connected in any way with the 
age of the person in whose honour they were 
erected, but simply the result of a fashion, or the 
taste, or means of the erecter, preferring minia- 
ture to full-sized figures. 

An interesting paper on the subject, by Mr. 
Walford will be found in the third vol. of the 
Journal of the Archaeological Institute for 1846, 1 
pp. 234, et seq. It specially treats on that at 
Horsted Keynes, Sussex. There is also a notice 



^d S. III. JAN. 24, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUEKIES. 



in vol. iv. of the same publication, p. 155, of the 
one at Mappowder in Dorsetshire, a cast of which 
may be seen in the Museum of the Institute, m 
Suffolk Street. 

I may be excused for mentioning that I myself 
was fortunate enough to be permitted to restore 
both these monuments at different periods of my 

Amongst the examples enumerated by Mr. 
Walford is that of Tenbury, which, however, 
appears to be about double the length (4 feet) 
of those I have met with. Mr. Walford justly 
argues that a knight or a priest, in the garb of 
which these figures are ordinarily clothed, must 
needs have been adults. C. W. BINGHAM. 

ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETIES (3 rd S. iii. 6.), 
The earliest I believe to have been the " London 
Architectural Society" founded in 1806. The 
members who instituted this body were J. Woods, 
Jun., President; J. Elmes and Savage, Vice- 
Presidents ; and Aikin, W. H. Ashpitel, Saml. 
Beazley, Billing, Birkhead, Bubb, Busby, Good, 
H. Elmes, Lowry, Peacock, Perry, Schroder, C. 
Smith, G. Smith, J. Taylor, J. Wallen. Sin- 
gularly enough, the last three named are, I be- 
lieve, the only survivors. The Society published 
a volume of Essays about 1808, which was very 
well received at the time, and has now become 
extremely scarce. A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 

THE PORTLANDERS (3 rd S. iii. 33.) As a rule 
the compilers of Topographical Dictionaries are 
not very exact as to their historical facts. Mr. 
Lewis certainly is not so in the extract given by 
your correspondent. The circumstance referred 
to is, without doubt, the following fact, which is 
recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , p. 118 of 
Mr. Thorpe's new edition, under the year 837. 
The ancient chronicler thus narrates it : 

" ^Ethelhelm ealdorraan gefeaht with tha Dseniscan on 
Portmid Dorsseton, and se ealdorman wearth of slaegen, 
and tha Daeniscan uhton waelstowe geweald." 

jEthelhelro, the ealdorman (of Dorsetshire), 
fought the Danes in Portland, with the posse of 
his shire, and was slain, and the Danes were 
masters of the field of battle. H. C. C. 

IGNEZ DE CASTRO (3 rd S. ii. 516.) E. H. A. 
may like to know that his Inez, a Tragedy, 8vo, 
1796, is by Charles Symmons, D.D. It was re- 
printed in 1812, in Poems, by Caroline Symmons 
and Charles Symmons (father and daughter), 8vo, 
London, by Johnson. In this, alluding to the 
original publication of Inez, the author says, 
" the circulation was so restricted that this re- 
print may be looked upon as its first actual ap- 
pearance in the world." It was offered to one of 
the theatres, but the manager, thinking that some 
passages in it might be supposed to allude to an 
event on the tapis, it was declined. J. Q. 



BISHOP KEN (3 rd S. iii. 26.) Some few years 
ago I possessed a copy of Ken's Manual, of the 
date 1709, and to the best of my recollection the 
original text was given in this edition ; so that it 
must have been in some after edition that the text 
was revised. 

The "Three Hymns" first appeared in the 
sixth edition, 1697, and not, as stated in the note, 
1770. DANIEL SEDGWICK. 

HOPPESTERES IN CHAUCER (2 nd S. iv. 407 ; x. 
227, 523 ; xi. 39.) In the Pardoner's Tale, when 
he is describing the banquetting and riotous living 
of the young men, he says : 

" And right anon comen in tomblesteres, 
Fetis and smale, and yong foitereres." 

The glossary to the black-letter folio (1687) 
explains "tomblesteres" as "tumblers, and the 
last word as vagabonds. If we follow the analogy, 
we should take " hoppesteres " as hoppers, or per- 
sons going on one leg, the other being disabled or 
in some way rendered useless. The passage would 
then signify " Then saw I the ships crippled, or 
disabled," or " in distress," which seems to accord 
with the context. A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 

GALLOWAY, CARRICK, AND HAY OF DRUMSBOOT 
(3 rd S. ii. 466.) Richard Hay, of Drumsboote, 
printed and published, in 1722, a pamphlet or 
tract, entitled An Essay on the Origin of the 
Royal Family of the Stewarts, 4to, which was re- 
printed at Edinburgh in 1793. He also issued, 
in 1723, A Vindication of Elizabeth More from 
the Imputation of being a Concubine, and her Chil- 
dren from the Tache of B aster dy, 4to. This curi- 
ous tract was reprinted in a volume entitled 
Scotia Eediviva, 8vo, 1826. Now your corre- 
spondent CHEVRON should look into these works, 
for they may afford him some information as to 
the Kennedies, &c. S. G. T. 

Edinburgh. 

HOLYROOD HOUSE (3 rd S. ii. 490.) In the 
year 1780 there was published a poem, entitled 
Holyrood House : an Elegy, with an Account of the 
Riding of the Scots Parliament, and a description 
of the Regalia of Scotland, in small 4to, with a 
frontispiece. But the author was understood to 
be a " James Murray." S. G. T. 

Edinburgh. 

PITCAIRNEY LAWSUIT (3 rd S. iii. 27.) There 
were during last century two Scotch lawyers of 
note of the name of Grant. The most eminent of 
the two was Patrick, who was called to the bar in 
1712 ; raised to the bench of the Court of Session 
in 1732, under the title of Lord Elchies, and died 
in 1754. He left a valuable manuscript collec- 
tion of decisions, which was printed and pub- 
lished in 1813. The other was William, who came 
to the bar in 1722 ; became Lord Advocate of 
Scotland in 1746, and in 1754 succeeded Patrick 



78 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 24, '63. 



(already mentioned) as a Judge of the Court of 
Session, by the title of Lord Prestongrange. He 
died in 1764. 

The information in your correspondent's Query 
is too vague and scanty to receive as yet any 
reply more satisfactory than what I have stated. 
Were he to explain where he has found any men- 
tion of the lawsuit, and what that mention is, it 
might lead to the means of a more special and 
decided answer. G. 

Edinburgh. 

KEV. BENJAMIN WAY (3 rd S. iii. 35.) At the 
request of a private correspondent I have searched 
the registers and other parish books of Allh allows 
Barking, for information respecting this Puritan 
divine. There are no references to him in our 
books, and he was not ejected from this living by 
the Act of Uniformity. The incumbent of this 
parish from 1644 to 1660 was Thos. Clendon, who 
was appointed upon the deprivation of Dr. Ed- 
ward Layfield (see " N. & Q." 3 rd S. ii. 145.) Lay- 
field was restored before the passing of the cele- 
brated Bartholomew Act, and for him Clendon 
seems quietly to have made way. If GEORGE 
PRYCE and your other correspondents interested 
in the matter will refer to Hutchins's History of 
Dorset, sub. " West Stafford," they will find that 
Benjamin Way, A.M. was ejected from West 
Stafford rectory in 1662, and that after keeping a 
school in Dorchester for a short time, he died 
pastor of an Independent church at Bristol in 
1680. J. MASK ELL. 

Allhallows Barking Vestry. 

PULTENEY'S MARRIAGE (3 rd S. ii. 402.) 
Pointer's Chronology fixes the date of the mar- 
riage of Pulteney, then Secretary at War, with 
Miss Gumley, as Dec. 27, 1714. P. M. 

JOHN WILKES : HIS FAMILY (2 nd S. xii. 525 ; 
3 ra S. i. 217,318.) 

" John Wilkes is by some supposed to have been de- 
scended from Col. Wilkes, a man of some celebrity during 
the Civil Wars, who sided with the Parliament . . . but 
that is not the fact ; he was the son of Mr. Israel Wilkes, 
a distiller, who was son of another Israel Wilkes, a dis- 
tiller, who was son of a third Israel Wilkes. The great- 
grandfather, grandfather and son, were all alive at the 
same time, and all flourishing tradesmen." City Bio- 
graphy. 

He is said, by some, to have been son of a Na- 
thaniel Wilkes, and unquestionably bore the arms 
mentioned by your correspondent in p. 318, as 
appertaining to Wilks of Wolverhampton. 

With respect to his Staffordshire origin, Shaw 
(History of Staffordshire, vol. ii. p. 201) states as 
follows : 

" Aldersley, commonly called Autherley, about half a 
mile N. E. of Tettenhall, consists principally of two mo- 
derate sized farms. The house and part of the estate be- 
longing to the upper farm were formerly the residence 
and land of the Wilkes" family (said to have been ancestors 



of the celebrated f patriot ' of that name), where they lived 
on a decent competency in quiet." 

I presume it was to these Wilkes's of Autherley 
that the coat in question legally appertained, and 
that, in consequence of a presumed common origin, 
it was adopted by the demagogue. 

It seems strange that so little should be known 
of the origin of a man of such notoriety. That 
there was such a person as Israel Wilkes is evi- 
dent from the fact of the signature of "Israel 
Wilkes, junr." appearing in a volume of theatrical 
tracts of the end of the seventeenth century. (See 
it mentioned in an undated Catalogue of Kers- 
lake of Bristol.) 

I may add that the arms of Wilkes of Willen- 
hall, as borne by Dr. \Vilkes, the Staffordshire 
antiquary, were totally different, being paly or and 
gu, on a chief arg. 3 lozenges of the second. (See 
Shaw, ut ante} H. S. G. 

POLVARTIST : JOHN HOWELI (3 rd S. ii. 491.) 
Your correspondent MR. N. MACKIE has, in his 
communication, made a few mistakes. Allow me 
to correct the same. " Polyartist " (one who can 
turn his hand to many things) is the profession of 
"John Howell," who at present resides at 110, 
Rose Street, Edinburgh. He is a well known 
person, originally bred a " bookbinder," and his 
workshop was for many years in Thistle Street. 
But being a very singular, eccentric person, pos- 
sessed of a considerable amount of information on 
many subjects, with a turn for mechanics, inven- 
tions, &c., he gave up the bookbinding and opened 
a shop in 22, Frederick Street, Edinburgh, de- 
signating himself as a "Polyartist, and dealer 
in curiosities, old coins, china, carvings, &c., &c. ;" 
where he made himself very useful in the mend- 
ing of china and old furniture, and metal an- 
tiquities ; but the shop did not succeed as he 
had expected, and in the course of a few years 
afterwards he gave it up, retiring to where he is 
at present. As respects his " literary talents," 1 
may mention here that he was the editor of The 
Journal of a Soldier of the 7 1st Regiment, 1806 
1815; The Life of John Nicol, the Mariner ; and 
the author of An Essay on the War Galleys of the 
Ancients ; The Life and Adventures of Alexander 
Selkirk (the original of Defoe's Robinson Crusoe) ; 
The Life of Alexander Alexander, $*c. This very 
strange person is now up in years, and in bad 
health ; who, having little means of support, was 
admitted lately to an out-pension of Trinity Hos- 
pital by the Town Council of this city. S. G. T. 

Edinburgh. 

SIR FRANCIS CHERRY (3 rd S. ii. 425, 497.) In 
1598, he was sent to Russia with a letter from 
Queen Elizabeth to the Emperor, vindicating the 
queen from false and scandalous reports of assist- 
ing the great Turk, and in behalf of her mer- 
chants trading in those parts. He was a member 



3rd S. III. JAN. 24. '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



79 



)f the Vintners' Company. In 1599 he subscribed 
>OOZ. to the voyage to the East Indies ; and in j 
"he following year occurs as one of the Directors j 
)f the East India Company. See the Lord j 
Treasurer's minutes of his Commission in Strype's 
Annals, iv. 157. The Emperor's letter to the 
peen, sent by him, is given in Egsrton Papers, 
5. 288; and a declaration of Cherry's^ proceedings j 
>ccurs at p. 292 of the last mentioned work. | 
Several notices of Sir Francis Cherry will be 
bund in Green's Cal Dom. State Papers, Jac. I., 
. 119, 157, 189, 191 ; ii. 169. Sainsbury's Cal. of 
East India Papers, pp. 100, 105, 109, 116, 117, 
95. C. H. COOPER. 

Cambridge. 

DON CARLOS (3 rd S. iii. 6.) The sobriquet, 
' Don Carlos," adopted by " Leonidas" Glover in 
he Memoirs, referred to Frederick, Prince of 
,Vales. S. T. 

" THE ENGLISH APE" (3 rd S. iii. 25.) I think 
! can state confidently that the Stationers' Regis- 
ers contain no entry of the work to which MR. 
)AREW HAZLITT'S question refers, The English 
ipe, by W. R., not *forsan W. Rankins," as 
he Bodleian Catalogue has it, but certe W. Ran- 
:ins, the author of The Mirror of Monsters, pub- 
ished in 1587 the year before The English Ape 
ame out. There is reason to believe that Ran- 
ins, in spite of his denunciation of plays and 
layers in his Mirror of Monsters, afterwards be- 
amc a writer for Henslowe's Theatre, and put forth 
small volume of Satires in 1598, of which I never 
aw more than one copy. There are at least two 
xtant copies of his Mirror of Monsters ; and, as 
IR. C. HAZLITT no doubt correctly informs us, two 
ditions or issues of The English Ape, although I 
ever before heard of any exemplar but that at Ox- 
3rd. MR. C. HAZLII r is unquestionably aware that 
undreds of books, especially of a dubious charac- 
2r, were printed and circulated, which never 
aund their way into the Registers at Stationers' 
lall; and printers were not unfrequently fined 
)r not having procured the consent of the Corn- 
any. In making my extracts, I purposely ex- 
luded books of imperfect science, dry divinity, 
r mere politics, and turned my attention mainly 
3 works of general and light literature. Of 
ourse, had I seen the entry, I should have care- 
illy recorded such a work as Rankin's English 
[pe. I could hardly have passed it over without 
bservation. J. PAYNE COLLIER. 

CHIEF BARON JAMES REYNOLDS : BARON JAMES 
;EYNOLDS (3 rd S. iii. 54.) I am very grateful to 
[ERUS FRATER for his interesting communication 
ilative to these judges, and for his kind offer 
) afford me further information ; of which I shall 
iost gladly avail myself, if he will be so good as 
) write to me at Churchill House. Dover. 

EDWARD Foss. 



CHRISTMAS CAROL (3 rd S. iii. 6, 59.) There is 
no difficulty : two persons may be in three ships, 
or in twenty. If Joseph and Mary came to Eng- 
land in a fleet of three ships, they came in three 
ships ; and if they settled in the southern coun- 
ties, they settled in some dozen of counties. It is 
history that thousands of Normans invaded Eng- 
land, and killed Harold : but no one supposes 
that every man of them struck a blow ; if it had 
been so, finding the body of Harold would have 
made a nice picture. Whatever is contained in 
the part is contained in the whole : and when the 
parts are spoken of collectively, the collection 
contains all that each part contains. Thus it is 
quite correct to say that a man and his wife are 
living together in the three kingdoms. Usage may 
designate the kingdoms in a collective manner by 
aid of the article ; but no usage, ancient or mo- 
dern, imperatively requires that simple numerical 
description shall always be distributive, and never 
collective. Old English is more free on such 
points than our language, perhaps ; but any very 
stern querist may have decisive instances brought 
against him. For example, no one can doubt 
the propriety of " he came to town in a coach and 
four;" but if he, be he who he may, had done 
this distributively, the finding of his body would 
also have made a nice picture. A. DE MORGAN. 

PAMMENT-BRICK (Pavimentuni) (3 rd S. iii. 27) 
is contract for brick pavement, as Covent is for 
Convent Garden. Parnment-brick is still in com- 
mon use with builders in East Anglia. In the 
west of England it is called a brick-floor, which is 
(or was formerly) frequently laid down in cot- 
tages, or in the back-kitchen of a farm-house. 
Seethe simple derivation of "pavement" in the 
Greek Testament, Johnxix. 14, \i6oa-rpuTov; A.-S. 
geostanning, translated in the English version " the 
pavement ; " in Hebrew gabbatha. Roman roads 
were \i6oo TpiaTov, i. e. stone blocks closely rammed 
together like our London streets, which first began 
to be so paved in the thirteenth century. Pavio, 
to ram or tread down. Hence our word pavier : 

" God bless you, Sir I the wondering paviers cry, 
Suspend their work, and lay their rammers by," 

when a Daniel Lambert walks across the street 
where they are at work. But the pavement 
whereon Pilate sat in the Judgment Hall was 
either slabs of marble, as in Grecian temples, or 
Mosaic pavement made of small burnt bricks curi- 
ously inlaid, and of divers colours, " arte et pictura 
elaboratis;" tesselated pavements, such as are oc- 
casionally found at Roman stations in Britain, e. g. 
at Cirencester (contract. Ciceter.) Such Horace 
alludes to in his Ode to Postumus, " et mero 
Tinget pavimentum superbum." But this superb 
pavement is now surpassed in beauty by Minton's 
coloured tiles, which in almost all new churches 
are laid down instead of the old-fashioned rough 



80 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAN. 24, '63. 



pavement or stone slabs. English rural churches 
formerly had always such floors, which were kept 
in repair at the expense of the parish. Many 
years ago a dispute having arisen between an old 
Devonshire vicar and the churchwardens about 
repairing the chancel, the wordy war ran so high 
that the parties almost came to blows. The vicar, 
however, at length floored the whole vestry by a 
happy Latin quotation: "Paveant illi, non pa- 
veam ego," let them pave the chancel, not I. 
Having spouted out his Latin authority, orerotundo, 
he walked off, leaving the farmers dumbfounded 
at the vicar's extensive learning : 

" And still they gazed, and still their wonder grew, 
That one small head could carry all he knew." 

QUEEN'S GARDENS. 

JOHN KNOWLES (3 rd S. iii. 35) was originally 
of Magdalen College, Cambridge, where he took 
his degrees (B.A. 1623-4, M.A. 1627). On July 
9, 1627, he was admitted a Fellow of Catherine 
Hall, where he obtained extraordinary repute as 
a tutor. Notices of him may be found in Cotton 
Mather's Magnolia, iii. 216; Calamy ; Wilson's 
Dissenting 1 Churches, i. 1 54 ; Morant's Colchester, 
i. 96, iii. 15 ; Laud's Works, v. 348 ; D'Ewes's 
Autobiography, ii. 69 ; and Green's Cal. Domest. 
State Papers, temp. Car. II., ii. 87, 98, 399 ; iii. 
258, 266, 292, 379, 442, 517, 522, 555, 593, 678. 
We may remark, that the last-mentioned work 
furnishes some curious facts respecting him not 
before known. C. H. & THOMPSON COOPER. 

Cambridge. 

THE " HALSEWELL " (3 rd S. iii. 9, 34.) The 
loss of Capt. Pierce (or Peirce) and his daughters 
is poetically deplored in Darwin's Botanic Garden, 
part i. canto iv. ; and in a note it is said that 
" Capt. Pierce, finding it was impossible to save 
the lives of the young ladies, refused to quit the 
ship, and perished with them." J. D. 



NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC. 

The Quarterly Review for January, 1863. 

The new Number of The Quarterly contains a larger 
proportion of grave papers than is usual with this great 
Conservative Review. An article on Peru furnishes an 
interesting view of the physical and social condition of 
that country, as one on the " Constitutional Government 
of Russia " furnishes new and valuable information on 
the reforms to which the attention of the Russian Govern- 
ment is now directed. The paper on "Institutes for 
Working Men" deserves the attention of all who are 
interested in the management of such institutions. That 
on the " New Testament " reviews the labours of Words- 
worth, Alford, and Ellicott, and insists on the duty of the 
study of it in the original language as a safeguard against 
that " presumptuous and most miserable scepticism, 
whose beginning is conceit, its course ignorance, its fruit 
misery, its end death." A paper on the " South Ken- 
sington Museum and Loan Exhibition " will interest our 
art-loving and archaeological friends. The " Life of John 



Wilson " and Lord Stanhope's recently published volume 
of " Miscellanies " furnish the literary papers. There is 
an article on "The Ticket of Leave System," and the 
usual political paper, " Four Years of a Reforming Ad- 
ministration," which would seem to indicate that the 
coming Session will show somewhat more of political 
energy than the last, closes the Quarterly. 

The Museum. A Quarterly Magazine of Education, 
Literature, and Science. No. VIII. 

To those of our readers interested in educational mat- 
ters, it is unnecessary to do more than to indicate the 
appearance of the new number of this useful Journal. 
We may, for the information of the general reader, state 
that, in addition to many valuable papers on educational 
questions, the Number contains two of biographical 
interest, Joseph Lancaster and Christopher North. 

The Journal of Sacred Literature and Biblical Record. 
Edited by B. Harris Cowper. No. IV. New Series. 

As might be expected, the present Number contains 
two articles on Bishop Colenso. The other papers are : 
" The Protestant Clergy in Bohemia ; " " Reuss' History 
of Christian Theology ;" " The Dublin Codex Rescriptus ;" 
"Exegesis of Difficult Texts;" "Marcus Antoninus, a 
Persecutor;" "The Interpretations of Scripture;" and 
" The Egyptian Dynasties of Manetho, by Dr. Hincks," 
and a large mass of Correspondence, Notices of New 
Books, &c. 

The Home and Foreign Review. No. III. 

This Review is, we believe, the recognised organ of the 
Roman Catholic Church in this country. It contains 
many ably written articles; and its notices of contem- 
porary literature review briefly no less than sixty-three 
books recently published, either in England or on the 
Continent. 



BOOKS AND ODD VOLUMES 

WANTED TO PURCHASE. 

Particulars of Price, &c., of the following Books to be sent direct to 
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to 

The following are in tyve : Oldys's Notes on Hudibras; Quaint i 
Curious Entries in the Registers 01 Romford; Smith of StokePrior; '. 
rivation of Hackney; The Complutensian Polyglot; Shakspeare, ' 
ney, and Essex; Anonymous Works: Eubulus: KomishRy me; "" 
mas Carols; Ruins in the Strand, and will be inserted as soon as 

It is impossible we, can undertake to furnish private Replies tc 
respondents. 



R. I. Inkerman, in Youthful Echoes, it simply 

Psyche's Interludes are not dramatic __ Enoch's Poems o 



( 'iiiilrii 
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tical charadct- 
Songs of the Sea Nymphs, do not contain any dramatic piece*. 

MR. THOMAS BENSLEY. In The Times of Tuesday last we regret 
find an announcement of the death of this old and valued correspondet 
to whose frequent contributions on historical and genealogical subj 
( formerly under the signature of TEE-BEE) many our readers have i 
greatly indebted. On tie \7th of November last we received a 
letter for him (we believe from T. E. S., p. 394 of our last volume) -. 
was duly forwarded ; but this letter he never received, as his death < 
currcd on the 28th of that month at Trevandrum, South India. " 
Bensley was the grandson of the celebrated printer, the occupies 
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Johnson. 

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THE QUARTERLY REVIEW, No. CCXXV., 
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CONTENTS : 

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IV. EDITIONS OF THE GREEK TESTAMENT. 
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VI. THE ART LOAN EXHIBITION. 
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IX. FOUR YEARS OF A REFORM ADMINISTRATION. 
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81 



LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 1863. 



CONTENTS. N. 57. 

NOTES : -The Ruins in the Strand, 81 - Shakspeare, Sid- 
ney; and Essex.. Letter L, 82 - Quaint and Curious En- 
tries in the Register of Romferd, co. Essex, 84. 

MINOK NOTES: " Lays of the last Stuart " Epitaph on a 
" Clockmaker - Natural Phenomenon - Refugees - Garot- 
ting in the Time of Queen Elizabeth History of Al- 
manacsRemains of an Indian Princess, 85. 

QUERIES: Smith of Stoke Prior, &c., 87 Anonymous 

Battledore and Shuttlecock at Leicester Baird Pedi- 
gree Corpses retaining Warmth Epigram on Pope 
Lucius II. George Daniel George IV. and Tom Spring 

Greek in Calabria The Lord High Almoner Hyber- 
nation of the Cuckoo Sir Roger Hopton Hannah 
Lisrhtfoot London Queries Mot of Louis le Grand 
Old Engraving Quotations Wanted Family of De 
Scurth or De Scur British Surnames Local Surnames 
Watson, Cornhill, London, 1693 Wine, 87. 

QUERIES WITH ANSWERS : Samuel Wesley " The Intel- 
ligencer," &c. A Lady married by Mistake Lightning 
Whist, 90. 

REPLIES: Anonymous Works: Eubulus: Romish Ryme, 
92 Who was Nevill Simmons ? 93 Christmas Carols, 94 

Derivation of " Hackney," 95 Boscobel Oak, Ib. 
"Home and Foreign Review" Sir Adrian Fortescue 
Deacon Brodie and the Drop Petrus Ludovicus Mill 
Keld The Ale-Yard Lowndes's "British Librarian" 

Itineraries of Edward I. and II., &c. Spiritual Songs 

Quotation Sale of Venison Stanysby The Georges 
Club Incised Inscriptions filled with Lead Minucius 
Felix Music and Architecture, 97. 



THE RUINS IN THE STRAND. 

The pedestrian who traverses the ancient high- 
way of the Strand in the month of January, 
1863, will find that many changes have " come 
o'er the scene." From the days of the Maypole, 
the football, and the pastimes of old London, we 
have come suddenly into the midst of the frolics 
of the new ; and wherever we go, whichever way 
we turn, gigantic* railways, hotels, and music 
halls strike our eye. Three examples of these 
changes I am now about to give. 

Hungerford Market. Upon its site once stood 
the palatial Hungerford House, the town resi- 
dence of the Hungerfords of Farleigh Castle, 
Wiltshire, and the last of whose race, Sir Ed- 
ward Hungerford, having squandered his fortune, 
obtained from Charles II. his royal charter for 
converting the site of the house and grounds 
into a market, and endeavour by this means to 
retrieve his fortune. This was in 1681. In 
1685, Sir Stephen Fox and Sir Christopher 
Wren were proprietors of the estate, in the 
centre of which was a lofty hall, with a bust of 
one of the Hungerfords. But the market did 
not prosper ; it remained till about thirty years 
ago, when Sir Thomas Tyrwhit, having set forth 
a project for rebuilding it in 1824, the second 
3triK* nre was commenced from the designs of 



Mr. Charles Fowler, upon the three acres and 
a quarter of ground, and was opened 2 July, 
1833, after costing 97,000/. This structure must 

known to nearly all, and it therefore suffices to 
say, that the Market Company, after paying off 
"n full the debentures and borrowed money, and 
returning to the shareholders 79 per cent, of their 
advances, sold the site of the market, as well as 
Brunei's Suspension Bridge, to the Charing Cross 
Railway Company, who thereupon, by means of 
public auction, sold the building materials, &c. 
of the hail (erected in 1851), the shops, with the 
stone columns, and surrounding houses in Vil- 
liers Street, Hungerford Street, and adjoining 
buildings, and upon the site commenced erecting 
(query) a railway TERMINUS. It is this railway 
that has destroyed the happiness of, and sent 
adrift, St. Thomas's Hospital, and it is this rail- 
way that causes the fine Bridge of Brunei's to be 
transported to Clifton. 

Exeter Change. The rise of the Strand Music 
Hall Company has caused the fall, not too soon, 
of Exeter Change. The site once occupied^ by 
the parsonage house and garden of St. Martin's, 
and subsequently by the mansion of the Cecil 
family, was, in the reign of William and Mary, 
the scene of the erection of the first Exeter 
Change. Through troubled times, when the poet 
Gray and Lord Baltimore lay here in state ; 
when Thomas Clark amassed here half a million, 
and Cross's Menagerie frightened horses in the 
Strand, Exeter Change struggled on, and it was 
not till 1829 that it was entirely destroyed; but 
on its site was erected the well-known Arcade, 
into which the jovial Punch oft paid a visit, and 
lamenting on its deserted look, sounded a note 
about its ill-paying prospects. But its dozen 
shops continued deserted, its power of attraction 
had long fled ; and when Messrs. Glasier & Son, 
on Dec. 10, 1862, sold the building materials and 
fittings in 130 lots, for the purpose of clearing 
the ground for the Strand Music Hall, one and 
all firmly believed that a more profitable work 
would arise from its ashes. 

Lyorfs Inn. Upon about half an acre of 
ground, and situated between Holywell, Wych, 
and Newcastle Streets, Strand, has stood for 
hundreds of years Lyon's Inn, an inn of Chancery, 
an appendage to the Inner Temple. From the 
year 1420 to the year 1862, the site has been 
tenanted by those " learned in the law," although 
of late years these gentlemen have visited it but 
seldom ; the last mortals on the spot clinging to 
the place with a despair brought on by long asso- 
ciation with the secluded nook. Taking its name 
from the sign of an hostelry, " The Ly^on," it, 
as an inn of Chancery, had for a reader, in 1578, 
none other than Sir Edward Coke. The Hall 
was erected in 1700, and it had "once upon a 
time," many trees, and a sun-dial, the latter 



82 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 31, '63. 



shorn of its gnomon and figures in 1828. A very 
well written article will be found on this subject 
in the Illustrated London News of Dec. 27. But 
if Lyon's Inn is dead, a tablet to its memory re- 
mains, for in one of its attics was annually col- 
lected the materials for the Post Office London 
Directory, when the size of that volume was not 
to be compared to the 2574 pages of the Directory 
of to-day. And close handy lived Philip Absolem, 
the antiquary, who so ably assisted Mr. Brayley 
in his [History of Westminster Abbey. But the 
inn having decayed, the Strand Hotel Company 
(capital 100,OOOZ.) took a lease of the ground for 
ninety-nine years, with power to purchase the 
freehold, and on Dec. 2, 1862, and two following 
days, there was sold, in 284 lots, the furniture, 
fittings, and building materials of the Hall, of 
Nos. 2 to 8 Lyon's Inn, and two houses in Holy- 
well Street, being the first clearance sale. The 
carved stone lion, and the dated shield (1700) on 
the hall front, being included in lots 204 and 205. 
Thus has fallen Lyon's Inn ! T. C. N. 



SHAKSPEARE, SIDNEY, AND ESSEX. 

LETTER I. 

" Shakspere has precedence over all poets who deal 
with the objective, inasmuch as his own personality is so 
abnegated, or concealed, that it needs the finest observer 
to conjecture what might be Shakspere's individual 
opinions and beliefs apart from those which he puts into 
the lips of his characters." " Let me explain the word 
' suggestive.' Thought is valuable in proportion as it is 
generative. If vital itself, though it be but a germ, it 
vitalises thoughts in others which may bloom into petals, 
or mature into fruits not vouchsafed to itself. I cast my 
thoughts freely abroad ; let the winds waft them loose. 
It is according to the soil on which they fall that they 
will be sterile or fertile." Caxtoniana, Blackwood, Oc- 
tober, 1862. 

The following essay, the writer natters himself, 
is in the strictest sense suggestive ; being, as the 
understanding reader will readily perceive, a key 
to Shakspeare's art as well as to his heart. 

There is a general impression among critics 
and commentators that, in the character of Polo- 
nius, Shakspeare has satirised Lord Burghley; 
and this opinion is grounded chiefly on the cir- 
cumstance of his lordship having left ten precepts 
addressed to his son, Robert Cecil. It has also 
been remarked that Hamlet, notwithstanding his 
affection for Ophelia, exhibits a marked dislike to 
her father. Now it is not at all improbable, 
ohakspeare may have had some prejudices against 
this celebrated minister. The court of Queen 
Elizabeth had always been divided, and occasion- 
ally violently agitated by the two factions of 
Ujcil and Leicester; and as Shakspeare was a 
native of Warwickshire, we may feel assured he 
was a staunch partisan of the magnificent master 
)i Kemlworth, the munificent patron of the arts 



and of the popular drama. His sympathies must 
also have been strongly enlisted in favour of the 
Earl as the patron of Spenser ; whilst they must 
have moved him in an inverse degree against 
Burghley, who was certainly no patron of the 
muses, neither " of arms nor learning :" 

" For he, that now welds all things at his will, 
Scorns th'one and th'other in his deeper skill. 

" And now broad spreading like an aged tree, 
Lets none shoot up that nigh him planted be : 
O let the man, of whome the Muse is scorned, 
Nor alive nor dead be of the Muse adorned ? " 

The Ruins of Time. 

Let us, however, follow up the hint about the 
precepts, and see if there be not other signs and 
marks in this tragedy, all congruing to the same 
point. 

On the accession of Queen Mary, and the con- 
sequent change of religion, Lord Burghley, then 
Sir William Cecil, acted with characteristic cau- 
tion and prudence ; whilst conforming in minor 
points to the outward ceremonies of Popery, he 
remained faithful to the Protestant interest ; and 
when her majesty offered, " if he would change 
his religion, he should be her Secretary and 
Counsellor," like himself, he wisely and christianly 
answered : " he was taught and bound to serve God 
first, and next the Queen" 

I can hardly express my surprise on reading 
this passage ; for these words are identical with 
the reply of Polonius to the King : 

" Pol. Assure you, my good liege, 
I hold my duty, as I hold my soul ; 
Both to my God, one to my gracious king." 

Act II. Sc. 2. 

The state-papers and speeches of Lord Burgh- 
ley also mark the character of the man ; prolix 
and prosy, with a high conceit of his own sagacity. 
Nor should it be overlooked, that not only does 
Polonius give his benediction. to Laertes in the 
form of precepts ; but in his report to the King 
about Ophelia, he says : 

" And then I precepts gave her, 
That she should," &c. Act II. Sc. 2. 

Hence, it may be inferred, Polonius is not so 
much a satire as a portrait of Lord Burghley in 
1588. 

Nor is it an unreasonable supposition, that his 
son, Robert Cecil, is shadowed in Laertes ; his 
suspicious nature, his distrust of Hamlet's honour- 
able love, and his duplicity about the poisoned 
foil, sufficiently denote the young and crafty 
politician. 

Although electrified by the reply of Cecil to 
Queen Mary, yet I was scarcely less startled by 
the following passages in the "very long and 
tedious speech " of the Lord Keeper, Sir Nicholas 
Bacon, on opening Queen Elizabeth's first 
liament, the 25th January, 1559 : 



3'd S. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



83 



" In regard to civil matters, a general review of the 
existing laws was recommended ; particularly as to their 
sufficiency to repress enormities, and account to be taken 
' whether "any laws be too severe or too sharp, or too soft and 
too gentle; and the inclination and disposition of the 
people to be considered.' " 

" The general aspect of things, he remarked, was such 
as might administer to the mind of every true English- 
man comfort and discomfort, joy and sadness. Comfort, 
from the consideration of the virtues and qualifications of 
the new Queen, ' to whom nothing under the sun was so 
dear as the hearty love and goodwill of her nobles and 
subjects, nothing so odible, as what might cause or pro- 
cure the contrary ;' discomfort, from a view of ' the great 
decays and losses of honours, strength, and treasure, 
which had happened to the imperial crown.' " Nares's 
Memoirs of Lord Burghley, vol. ii. p. 36. 

These passages remind us of the opening speech 
of Claudius ; each speaker seems to weigh his 
words in a balance, seeking the golden mean : 

" King. Though yet of Hamlet pur dear brother's death 
The memory be green ; and that it us befitted 
To bear our hearts in grief, and our whole kingdom 
To be contracted in one brow of woe ; 
Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature, 
That we with wisest sorrow think on him, 
Together with remembrance of ourselves. 
Therefore, our sometime sister, now our queen, 
The imperial jointress of this warlike state, 
Have we, as {'were, with a defeated joy, 
With one auspicious and one dropping eye ; 
With mirth in funeral, and with dirge in marriage, 
In equal scale weighing delight and dole, 
Taken to wife : nor have we herein barr'd 
Your better wisdoms, which have freely gone 
With this affair along : For all, our thanks." 

Act I. Sc. 2. 

A satirical writer bitterly says of Bacon : " His 
Lordship could neither by the greatness of his 
beads, creeping to the cross, nor exterior show of 
devotion before the high altar, find his way into 
high dignity in Queen Mary's time." Are we not 
here again reminded of Claudius, not merely of his 
attempt at prayer, but also of another passage : 

"Pol Ophelia, walk you here : Gracious, so please 

you, 
We will bestow ourselves : Read on this book, 

[ To OPHELIA. 

Inat show of such an exercise may colour 
Your loneliness. We are oft to blame in this, 
Tis too much prov'd, that, with devotion's visage, 
And pious action, we do sugar o'er 
The devil himself. 

" King. O, 't is true ! 

How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience ! 

Act III. Sc. 1. 

Sir Nicholas Bacon received the appointment 
of Lord Keeper through the recommendation of 
l^ord Burghley ; and some years before, they had 
both married daughters of Sir Anthony Cooke. 
Inere had always been a violent antagonism be- 
tween Sir Nicholas and the Earl of Leicester; 
we^need not then be surprised if Polonius be a 
satire on Lord Burghley ; Claudius may also be a 
"-e on Sir Nicholas Bacon : and it would cer- 
tainly \j e a singular circumstance, nor is it at all 



improbable, the same person stood for Sir John 
Falstaff as for Claudius : 

" A man of a gross body, but most quick wit ; singular 
prudence, supreme eloquence, happy memory, and for judg- 
ment the other pillar of the state." " The old gentleman's 
manner, however, seems to have had about it something 
of the ridiculous, for the saying went, ' that some seemed 
wiser than they were, but the Lord Keeper was wiser 
than he seemed.' " " The Lord Keeper's figure seems to 
have been the subject of much jesting at Court. The 
Queen herself, alluding to it, said, ' Sir Nicholas's soul 
lodges well.' "" Many of his bon-mots have been pre- 
served, and show that, for a Keeper of the Great Seal, he 
was by no means a contemptible jester." Campbell's 
Lives of the Lord Chancellors. 

From the foregoing statement it would appear, 
that in the characters of Claudius, Polonius, and 
Laertes, Shakspeare points at Sir Nicholas Bacon, 
Lord Burghley, and his son Robert Cecil three 
bitter enemies of the Earl of Leicester. Who, 
then, is Hamlet ? He dislikes Polonius, though 
he loves his daughter ; he has reasons for hating 
Claudius, and is the friend of Laertes. In Sir 
Philip Sidney we find a man, not only in some 
respects thus affected, but possessing the very 
character of Hamlet himself. 

In such a satirical production, we may be sure 
the author would to a certain extent disguise his 
characters; but our surprise in the present in- 
stance is not so much at the ingeniousness of the 
disguise, as at its singular transparency. In the 
Footsteps of Shakspeare I have pointed out that, 
although Francklin and Potter, in their transla- 
tions of the Orestean cycle of Greek tragedies, 
have adopted the phrases of Hamlet, yet it never 
occurred to them Shakspeare may by some means 
or other have read those tragedies ; and here we 
have a similar instance of unsuspiciousness in the 
Life of Sir Philip Sidney, by Gray, who thus 
begins and ends : 

" The life of Sir Philip Sidney is one of the most fault- 
less and interesting of which our history can boast. By 
his contemporaries he appears to have been regarded as 
4 the glass of fashion, and the mould of form ;' as the 
Bayard of England, 'sans peur et sans reproche'; the 
mirror of knighthood and the flower of chivalry." 
" Thus perished, in the very prime of his days and the 
zenith of his hopes, the man who was above all others 
the idol of his time, ' the courtier's, scholar's, soldier's 
eye, tongue, sword.' " 

" He was not only of an excellent wit," says Aubrey, " but 
extremely beautiful; he much resembled his sister, but 
his hair was not red, but a little inclining, viz. a dark 
amber colour. If I were to find a fault in it, methinks 
'tis not masculine enough ; yet he was a person of great 
courage. My great uncle, Mr. T. Browne, remembered 
him ; and said, that he was wont to take his table-book out 
of his pockets, and write down his notions as they came into 
his head, when he was writing his Arcadia [which was 
never finished by.him] as he was hunting on our pleasant 
plains." 

In a letter to Sir Francis Walsingham, his 
father-in-law, dated Utrecht, March 24th, 1586, 
Sir Philip says : 



84 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAN. 31, '63. 



" I had before cast my count of danger, want, and dis- 
grace ; and, before God, Sir, it is true in my heart, the 
love of the cause doth so far overbalance them all, that, 
with God's grace, they shall never make me weary of my 
resolution." "I understand / am called very ambitious 
and proud at home ; but certainly, if they knew my heart, 
they would not altogether so judge me." 

In a letter to his brother, Mr. Robert Sidney, 
then upon his travels, he says : 

" Now, sweet brother, take a delight to keep and in- 
crease your music. You will not believe what a want I 
find of it in my melancholy times ; " and he proceeds with 
an agreeable raillerj 7 upon himself: " I would, by the way, 
your worship would learn a better hand. You write worse 
than I, and 1 write evil enough. Once again, have a care 
of your diet, and consequently your complexion." 

He also urges him to " play at weapons : let no 
day pass ivithout an hour or two such exercise." 

" Indeed, a more exalted character than that of Sir 
Henry Sidney can scarcely be found in the volume of 
history. It deserves to be better known. In him we 
behold the brave soldier, the consummate general, the 
able counsellor, the wise legislator; while, in the re- 
cesses of private life, he was no less estimable as a hus- 
band, a father, and a friend: firmly attached to the 
Church of England, and adorning his Christian profes- 
sion by his temperance and exemplary piety." Zouch. 

On one occasion, Sir Henry " distinguished him- 
self in single combat with a Scottish chieftain, whom 
he overthrew and stripped of his arms" 

These extracts appear to justify the supposition 
that, in the characters of Hamlet and his father, 
Shakspeare had in his mind's eye Sir Philip Sid- 
ney and his father ; and in Ophelia, perhaps Anne 
Cecil, to whom Philip had been engaged in his 
youth, and whom Sir Henry called his " sweet 
jewel ;" and who had afterwards, in her unhappy 
marriage with the Earl of Oxford, sad cause to 
regret the selfishness of her father. In a tragedy 
so well known it can scarcely be necessary to point 
out the resemblances further than by the words 
marked in italics, which should be compared with 
the following extracts : 

" Ham. My tables, my tables, meet it is I set it down." 

Act I. Sc. 5. 
" I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious." 

Act III. Sc. 1. 

* Devis'd a new commission ; wrote it fair : 
I once did hold it, as our statists do, 
A baseness to write fair, and labour'd much 
How to forget that learning." Act V. Sc. 2. 
" Hor. You will lose this wager, my Lord. 
" Ham. I do not think so ; since he went into France, 
I have been in continual practice : I shall win at the odds." 

Act V. Sc. 2. 

Of Hamlet's wit and melancholy, it is unneces- 
sary to speak, his supposed irresolution, and the j 
peculiar form of his mental disease, have been j 
fully discussed in the Footsteps of Shakspeare; \ 
wherein I have also shown the duration of the I 
play, from the death of old Hamlet to the final I 
scene, occupies a period of full five months ; and ! 



it is a singular coincidence, Sir Henry Sidney 
died on the 5th May, and Sir Philip on the 17th 
October, 1586 -just five months and twelve days 
intervening. C. 

{To he continued.) 



QUAINT AND CURIOUS ENTRIES IN THE RE- 
GISTER OF ROMFORD, CO. ESSEX. 

Baptised. 
1595, Aug. 3. Roger filia (szc) of a certen wayfaring 

woman. 
1605, Aug. 11. George, the baseborne of one of my Ladye 

Coke's servants. 

1622, Oc r 8. Anne, daughter of a poor worn, at Gossais. 
1637, May 18. Wlm Shakspurre, son of Samuel. 
[Many more entries of the name of Shakspere.] 

1665, Sep T 14. Nicholas, the sonn of M^ Nicholas Clark 
and Elizabeth his wife, who then lived at Noak 
Hill, the said M r Clark being a citizen. 

1682, Nov. 5. Hagar posthumus d. of Jeffrey Pallmer, 
late of Rumford, who hang'd himself. 

1690, Jan? 7. Thomas Love, son of John Love, a black- 
a-moor servant at Gudy Hall. 

1693, Feb. 28. Katherin, dau. of Henry Wilson, a tranci- 

lator. 

1694, June 24. Thomas Bennitt, son of John B. at pest- 

house in Collirow. 

Note. May, 1760. Mem. John More, who officiated as 
clerk, having absented himself for the greatest 
part of the two following months ; viz. May and 
June, the account is imperfect of baptisms in 
those months. Gloucester Ridley, Chaplain. 

1765. Everina, daughter of Edward John Wollstonecroft 

and Elisabeth his wife Hare Street. 
[This marks one of the many residences of the father 
' of Mary Wollestonecroft Godwin, who was herself 
born about two miles from Romford, in an old 
house near the Whalebone.] 

1768, Dec' 16. Edward Shambles, a deserted child, named 
from the place where he was left. 

1795, Aug. 6. Wheat sold in Romford market by M r 
Charles Freeman of Herongate, to M r Pincheon 
of Upminster Mill at 33 pounds per load. 

Buried. 
1562, May 28. John Drynckwater of y e hospitall at 

Londo. and norsid w 1 ' Mother Rachell, sepultue 

fuit. 

Dec. 1. Father Story, sep. f *. 

1566, Sep r 15. Sepultus fuit Johannes Acanthus qui fuit 

senex et literatus. 
1570, Aug. 30. Sep. f * . . . extraneus qui obiit ap. signo 

Angeli. 
1574, Sep r 22. Robertus Cottonus goonne powder. 

1604, Dec r 10. A poore woman died in Mawnes Bariie. 
16. A boy died in the market-place. 

1605, Feb. 1. Quid father Giles. 

1606, March 11. Ould Ar?os of Havering. 

12. Mother Winger of the Allmess-house. 

1610, May 1. Goodman Wells of Noke-hill. 
14. The wife of one Lough, a taylor of Noke- 
hill. 

20. Goodwife Erldy, y e curryer. 

30. Ollyver, a prison 1 " executed and buryed. 

1610, Dec r 10. Margarett Ramoott, an ould spinster. 

1611. Jan. 1. A servant of Goodman Hare, y e Gl^ er - 



3" S. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



85 



1611, Feb. 3. Nicholas, a trauayler, died at y<> Talbott. 
_ May 16. Ould M r Outread was buried. 

1612, Jany 12. An Infant of a walkinge womans. 

- Feb. 24. Ould mother Dickenson. 

_ April 21. Dumbe Joan from Holmans, Hare S 4 . 

1615, Jany 22. A poor travelling ma y l was drowned. 

_ March 9. Thomas Brett, a lame ma. 

1G16, Aug. 6. Wlm Coop, y e dwarf of Giddie-hall. 

_ gept 22. A stranger y* died in y barn of S r 

Robert Q. 

[Sir Robert Quarles of Stewards, brother of Francis 
Quarles the poet.] 

1617, April 9. Jermyn, a vagrant. 

1618, Ocf 17. A vagrant y* dyed in y c constables hands 

as he was going 

1620, Aug. 11. Ane Steward, an old mayd. 
1625, Jany 11. A woma, whom they called madd megg.; 

- Aug. 24. Old Cryffe of Harolds-wood, an ancient 

mayd. 

1632, June 26. Jeffrey Shonk of Weald, killed w h a horse. 
1640, March 7. Ellen Cooke, a young maid. 
1647, July 17. The wife of Goodm: Turtle, y made away 

herself. 
1650, April 30. The widdy Barnstorn. 

1656, Oct r 29. Two women that were Executed. 

1657, March 25. Burryed one call'd black John. 
1661, Feb. 6. A servant of the Lord Herefords. 

1668, April 25. Cumber, a ffemale Blackamore servant 

from Guyddy Hall. 
1671, Jany 6. Elizabeth Wood, a maid that died in the 

prison of the small-pox. 
1675, April 19. Willm Nettle, a Nurse Ch, Nursed by 

Goody Shonks of H d W d . 
1677, Sep. 27. Willm Hill, Who came to doe harvest 

worke at Rumford, and dyed at the Dolphin 

there. 

- Dec* 27. Charles Salter of South Weald in Essex, 

Tanner, who was taken in Rumford Watch, and 
Received a'blow upon the head by one W m Peake, 
watchman, whereupon hee dyed. 
1679, May 15. Old lame John Pike of Rumford. 

1682, Jany 3. M^ John Moray, the elder, Corpall in Cap- 

taine Sandys his Troope. 

- March 15. M r . Thomas Bonner, a soldier in y e s d 

troope from the Blew Boare in Rumford. 
-- Aprill 29. M r ffrancis Smyth, one of y Cornells in 
Captaine Edwin Sandys his troope' from^ 6 bell 
in Romford. 
[Many entries of this kind occur in the registers.] 

Nov. 26. Jonathan Abell of Collier Row, strangled 
in y e brook there. 

1683, Dec r 16. John Parker, son of M r John of R., bein"- 

his 2 nd son of y* name. 

1685, Dec r 15. Matthew ffrancis, drawer of ye wine at y e 
sun in Rumford. 

1687, Jany 7. John (a Quarter M" man) who hanged 

himself at y e Dolphin in Rumford. 

- April 1. M r Robert Prentice an antient Bachelour 

- from Collier Row. 

1688, Feb. 9. A male Child of M' Birch Hothersall's un- 

bapt. from Guyddy Hall. 

1694, March 23. Robert Cruckeahankes, a souldier in his 

passage into Scotland. 

1695, Dec' 30. Rebecca Watts, widdow, a prisoner con- 

victed of Murther, Reprieved of sentence of con- 
demnation. (sic.) 
1/07, Oct Some time 



Cheek, Esq' 1 was buried at Pergoe by me " (P* M r 
1709, Dec' 23. A Palatine going to London. 



1710, Aug. 29. A male child of E. Hamilton, an Anabap- 
tist, put into y c ground. 

1713, March 6. Jacob Izard kill'd by y new Windmill. 

1716, March 4. Sarah Palmer, an infant, drowned by her 
lunatick mother. 

1741, Nov. 14. Arch. Angel, a Black Moor. 

1757, Feb. 2. A girl died of the Small pox at the Pest- 
house, unknown. 

1781, July 6. An Irishman kill'd in an affray. 

1794, Dec r 14. James Martin (a King's Messenger) shot 
near the Stoup by 5 footpads. 

1829, Dec 1 ' 3. A man unknown, who hung himself in 
Hornechurch Lane. 

Memorandums at the end of the first register 
book, which begins A.D. 1561 : 

"Mem. that I Wyllm browne have layde w* M' 
Atkys xii d that the plague was in london vpon Saint 
James' Dave syne 

" P. Will. Browne. 

" Per me Richardus Atkis. 

" Communycants at Romfowrde from Mydsomer, 1561." 
(About 500 names arranged in families. Among them 
occur) 

" John Tiler, 
Luce uxor h 
Elizabethe 
Sir Anthonie Cooke. 
Hawcks y c Steward, 
The butler, 
Y Cooke, 
Mother Chadbourne, vidua, 
Richard Cotton, | 

Elyzabethe ux or ipsius, j 
M r Legate. > 

Thomas and Kateryne vxo r ipsius." J 

EDWARD J. SAGB. 
Stoke Newington. 



ipsius, j- 
ifilia, J 



"LAYS OP THE LAST STUART." This title is 
given in the last number of the Quarterly Review 
(No. 225, p. 241), to some eight lines of verse, 
" discovered among the Stuart Papers at Wind- 
sor," by Lord Stanhope, and printed in his Lord- 
ship's recently published volume of Miscellanies. 
The Reviewer heads his article with this distich : 
" I hate all Kings, and the thrones they sit on, 
From the King of France to the Caliph of Britain ! " 

And he regards them as the expression of the 
detestation felt by the young Pretender " in the 
bitterness of exile," for " the false friend " and 
" the open foe," who had brought him to that 
condition. But they would seem to be rather a 
quotation (from memory) from the poem by the 
too-famous Rochester, " for which," it is said, " he 
was banished the Court." In this poem the lines 
read thus, 

" I hate all Monarchs, and the thrones that they sit on, 
From the Hector of France to the Cully of Britain." 

The curious in such matters will find this piece 
in Poems on State Affairs, vol. i. p. 171. It is pos- 
sible that the other " six lines " may be similarly 



86 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3rd S . HI. JAN. 31, '63. 



borrowed ; in which case it would seem that 
Charles Stuart was in poetrv as in politics, but a 
Pretender. C. S. P. 

EPITAPH ON A CLOCKMAKER. In the church- 
yard at Axbridge, Somerset, is an upright grave- 
stone thus inscribed : 

" Bilbie thy 

Movements kept in play 
For thirty years or more 
We say. 

" Thy Balance or thy 

Mainspring's broken, 

And all thy movements 

(Cease to work). 

" John Bilbie, of this parish, clockmaker, who died 
Sept. 13 th , 1767, aged 33 years." 

INA. 
Wells, Somerset. 

NATURAL PHENOMENON. The weather pre- 
ceding the 31st of December, 1862, had been 
variable, the wind changing from south to north, 
with cessation of rain. Two days after, the wind 
veered to the south-west in the morning of a 
beautiful day the last day of the year. Towards 
8 p. M., the sky was overcast with scattered clouds, 
which portended rain. At about 8.30 P.M., I 
observed at the apparent distance from the moon, 
then in her first quarter approaching the full, of 
two diameters, on the side remote from the wind- 
ward, all the colours of the solar iris, and almost 
as distinct, in a perfect semicircle, whose centre 
was coincident with the centre of the circle form- 
ing the moon's face, fringing the edge of a passing 
cloud. The phenomenon was beautiful and sug- 
gestive, but it soon passed away. 

ERNEST W. BARTLETT. 
Brighton. 

REFUGEES. A few years since I purchased a 
bundle of deeds, letters, and other papers re- 
lating to the following refugee families : Aufrere, 
De la Mothe, Guide, Duchesnay, Deslauriers, 
Grou, De Gastine, Basnage, Vandele, De la 
Grange, De la, Sarraz, Le Sueur D'Hervart, and 
others, ranging in date between 1679 and 1752. 
I parted with them to a member of one of the 
families to which they related ; but if the notes 
of their contents, which I retained, will be ac- 
ceptable to MR. JOHN S. BURN, he is welcome 
to the loan of them. G. A. C. 

GAROTTING IN THE TIME OF QUEEN ELIZABETH. 
In these days of garotting, the following extract 
fronx Greene's Ghost-haunting Conie- catchers, Lon- 
don, 1602, may, perhaps, not be uninteresting. 
Tawneguest" was the name given to a class of 
London rogues of the period. 

" Such Fawneguests were they, that meeting a prentise, 
who had beene to receive a hundred pounds for his mas- i 
ter, sodainly in the middest of Cheapside, in the daie 
time, and open market, slept .to him, as if they had bin 
familiarly acquainted with him, and sodainly cast the 



hinder skirt of his cloake over his face, making as though 
they had jested with him, and seeming to thrust their 
cold bands in his necke, one of them thratled him so sore 
by the wind-pipe, that he could make no noise, but so- 
dainly sunke to the ground, muffled in his cloke, while 
the other took from him the bagge with the money which 
he had under his arme, which done, they ranne away 
laughing, as if the deede were done in jest. Soon after 
the market folks and people passing by to and fro, per- 
ceiving the youth lie still on the ground and not stir up, 
stepped to him, and seeing in what state he was, rubbed 
and chafed him, and gave him Aqua vitse, so that soone 
after he came againe to himself: then looking about him, 
and seeing the people so gathered together, he cried unto 
them, ' 0, where's my money ? ' They, wondering to heare 
him talke of mony, told him both how his companions left 
him, and they found him, whereby the people knowing 
how he was deceived, made after them, but they were 
never heard of till this day." 

HENRY HUTH. 

HISTORY OF ALMANACS. 

" Nach Xpi geburt als man zalt tausent vierhundert 
sibetzig vnd zwey iar ist ain schalt iar vnd hat xiii ueuw 
schein vnd hat zwe~ suntteglich buchstabe, E vnd D. 
Vnd E bleipt biss auf Sant mathias tag. Vn darnach 
bleipt D biss zu end des iars. Die guldin zal ist X." 

r 1 i & o 
Ephemerides, I: . Museum Case Mark. 

The above is remarkable even as a specimen of 
the German vernacular at the end of the fifteenth 
century. So little has been written on the his- 
tory of printed Almanacs, that I think this is the 
earliest which has yet been produced, viz. A.D. 
1472. Brunet says that the bibliography of 
these things was so extensive, that he could not 
attempt to give it in his new edition. The ori- 

?inal from which this is copied is a fragment, and 
suspect has been found, as well as several others 
of the same time and in the same collection, in 
the linings of old books. If some one would 
assign the place and the name of the printer of 
these remains, it would add much to their in- 
terest. This is one of a series, all of which begin 
with the formula " als man zalt," and I have 
never seen this form in the MS. almanacs which 
exist of but a few years earlier. They are sheet 
almanacs, and magnificent specimens of printing. 
The earliest printed almanacs appear to have 
been compiled by persons practising medicine. 

WM. DAVIS. 

" REMAINS OF AX INDIAN PRINCESS. An American 
paper states that some persons have recently explored 
an Indian mound at Charlestown, Massachusetts, the 
burial place of Ninigret, the last of the Puequot sachems, 
and found the remains of his daughter, his only unmar- 
ried child. They dug 4ft. and came to three very large 
flat stones, weighing perhaps a ton each, liaising them 
out of the way, they continued digging 4ft. deeper. They 
then struck a large iron pot, filled with smaller pots, 
kettles, and skillets. They found also a large brass 
kettle filled with porringers, and other kitchen ware and 
bottles. On removing these they found under them de- 
cayed wood in the form of a large log, and an iron chain 
surrounded it. On one side were hinges, and on the op- 
posite side a padlock made fast to the chain. It appears 



. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



87 



that the log had been split in halves, the inside of each 
half excavated so as to receive the body of an adult. On 
removing the upper half they found a skeleton enshrouded 
in a silk robe, and on the head a cap or bonnet of green 
silk. Extending from the top of the head was a chain, 
like a watch-guard, down to the sole of the shoe, and 
there fastened to the outside sole near the toe. The 
leather of one of the shoes was decayed ; the other re- 
mains, and indicates a very delicate foot. Surrounding 
the waist was a belt made of wampumpeag, and covered 
with silver brooches as ornaments ; around the neck was 
a necklace, and at the wrists were silver sleeve-buttons. 
They found also two coins, one of silver, dated 1650, 
and a copper farthing ; also inside the log was a set of 
Dutch spoons, some metallic Dutch pipes, and ladies' 
thimbles, and other articles." The Times, Dec. 27, 1862. 

GRIME. 



SMITH OF STOKE PRIOR, ETC. 

Eobert Smith, Esquire, citizen of London, 
governor of the Merchant Adventurers of Eng- 
land in Antwerp and Middleborough, a native of 
Stoke Prior in Worcestershire, appears by his 
monumental brass in the church at that place, to 
have died March 23rd, 1609, set. 75, and to have 
had issue by his second wife Thomasine, daughter 
of Arthur Dedicott, Esq. (his first wife Susan, 
daughter of Sir R. Pyke, Knt., having died s.p.) 
eleven sons and six daughters. I should be 
much obliged to any correspondent for the names 
and matches of these children. 

In Harl. MSS. 1533 and 1566, an Edward 
Smythe, of Stoke Prior, is stated to have married 
Dorothy Denton, of Ambroseden, and to have 
had issue Edward, at. 1 year, [in 1573, and Joane 
or John. His arms there recorded are the same 
as those borne by Smyth of Upton* and the above- 
named Robert, except that the lion on the brass of 
the latter is gules and not ermines. Sir Robert 
Smyth, the first Bart, of Upton, in the parish of 
West Ham (so created 17 Car. II.) is said by Col- 
lins and Bentham to have been " son of a counsel 
learned in the law, of an ancient family, at Stoke 
Prior." 

In Harl. MS. 1057 or Add. MS. 19,816 (I 
forget which), are four descents of this family, 
commencing with Robert Smith of London, gold- 
smith, father of Robert S. of " in 

Worcestershire (Qy. Stoke Prior ?), father of 
another Robert of Lauder Street, who married 
the daughter of Walmesley, father of a fourth 
Robert, who married Miss Trafford of Essex. 
This Robert of Lauder Street is evidently the 
first baronet of Upton, who, say Collins and 
Betham, married Judith, daughter of Nicholas 
Walmesley, and whose son the same authorities 



* Recorded to Smyth, Westham, Essex, and Stoke Prior, 
co. Worcester, by Burke. The Upton family subsequently 
bore the lion sable. 



state to have married Jane, daughter of Joseph 
Trafford, Esq. In this last-named MS. is a trick 
(without tinctures) of the same arms as those 
above-named, viz. the ermine demi-lion in chief, 
but with a mullet in dexter chief for difference. 
Jacob Smith of Stoke Prior (son of Wm. S. of 
the same place, who, I think, was son of another 
William) who also bore these arms (with the 
lion saUe) was father, by Elizabeth Lowe his 
wife, of Wm. Smith, Esq. of Stoke Prior (after- 
wards of Hales Owen Grange, jure uxoris), who 
married Anne, eldest sister and coheir of Lord 
Dudley, and was ancestor of the family of Lea 
Smith, who possessed landed property at Stoke 
Prior, which has been in the family from Charles 
I.'s time, or earlier. I am very anxious to con- 
nect these different branches of evidently the 
same family, and should feel exceedingly obliged 
to the genealogical correspondents of " N. & Q." 
for their assistance. H. S. G. 

P.S. Lysons (Environs of London) states that 
Thomas Ravenscroft, Esq., died at Chipping 
Barnet 1630, having been twice married, to 
Thomasine Smith and Bridgett Powel. Arms on 
his monument, Ravenscroft impaling " Per pale 
az. and gu., 3 lions ramp., arg. for Smith." Qy. 
for Poivel, as this is the coat of Wm. Ap-Jenkin, 
ancestor of many Welsh families, and perhaps, 
inter alia, of Powel ? Can this be one of the six 
daughters of Robert of Stoke ? 



ANONYMOUS. Who compiled The Lawe's Reso- 
lutions of Womerfs Rights, or Lawe's Provision for 
Women, 4to, 1632 ? It is a very curious old 
book. GRIME. 

BATTLEDORE AND SHUTTLECOCK AT LEICES- 
TER. In Leicester, the approach of Shrove 
Tuesday (known amongst the youngsters as " shut- 
tlecock day ") is signalised by the appearance in 
the streets of a number of children playing at the 
game of battledore and shuttlecock. On the day 
itself the streets, in the lower part of the town, 
literally swarm with juveniles, and even grown 
men and women, engaged in the pastime. Is 
there any other than a merely accidental con- 
nection between this game and Shrove Tuesday ? 
Passing through a by- street the other day, I 
heard a little girl singing : 

" Shuttlecock, shuttlecock, tell me true, 
How many years have I to go through? 
One, two, three, four," &c. 

GREGORY. 

BAIRD PEDIGREE. I have a pedigree of this 
family, evidence in support of which I am most 
anxious to obtain. I therefore publish it in 
" N. & Q." It is, " William Baird of Byth 
(Aberdeenshire, cir. 1546), father of Thomas 
Baird of the Shows of Monfblairy, father of 



88 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. JAK. 31, '63. 



James Baird in Bankheid, father to Baillie John 
Baird in Cullen, father to the late James Baird 
of Chesterhall, born cir. 1670." Any information 
about these personages, their wives' names, issue, 
dates, &c., &c., will be very acceptable. 2. 0. 

CORPSES RETAINING WARMTH. Will any medi- 
cal or clerical correspondents state their experi- 
ence of the length of time that they have known 
dead bodies keep warm ? I have known two cases 
of females, who retained considerable warmth for 
nine and twelve hours respectively. But the 
most remarkable case I have found recorded, was 
that of Mr. Byron Blythe, who died of cholera at 
Bristol, at about half-past two in the morning of 
October 13, 1849; and whose body retained its 
warmth, and showed no signs of decomposition, 
till four days after his death. So it was stated in 
the papers at the time. F. C. H. 

EPIGRAM ON POPE Lucius II. Who was the 
author of the satirical lines on the avarice of 
Pope Lucius II., who was elected in 1144 ? 
" Lucius est piscis, rex atque tyrannus aquarum, 

A quo discordat Lucius iste parum ; 
Devorat hie homines, hie piscibus insidiatur, 

Esurit hie semper, hie aliquando satur. 

Amborum sensus, si lanx sequata probaret, 

Plus rationis habet qui ratione caret." 

PAPA. 

GEORGE DANIEL. Are there any biographical 
notices extant of George Daniel, a poet, temp. 
Charles I. ? He was born on May 29, 1617, and 
being a royalist, his estate was sequestered by an 
Act of Sale dated March 26, 1653. Perhaps his 
namesake, the author of Merrie England in the 
Olden Time, may have some memorabilia of him. 

J. Y. 

Barnsbury. 

GEORGE IV. AND TOM SPRING 

'* Our late sovereign, George IV., droveVTom Spring, 
in flesh-coloured silk stockings and yellow kerseymere 
breeches, down to fight for the belt in his own royal 
barouche and four." Spectator, December 6, 1862. 

Did George IV. ever drive a barouche and 
four ? Did he ever drive Tom Spring ? If he 
did, when? Whence? And whither? 

FlTZHOPKINS. 

GREEK IN CALABRIA. I have seen it stated 
(I think by Montfaucon) that the Greek language 
was preserved in Calabria, and other parts of 
Magna Graecia, as the common language, very late 
in the fifteenth century, and was also used in the 
offices of the church until it was abolished by 
Sixtus IV., and the Latin substituted in its stead. 

The famous monk Barlaam was, I believe, a 
Calabrian. ^The MS. treasures that have been 
discovered in the Greek and Eastern convents 
are well known. Are we indebted to this dis- 
trict, the ancient Magna Graecia, for any literary 
discoveries beyond the rolls found in Hercula- 



neum and Pompeii, and have the more remote 
parts of the late kingdom of Naples been searched 
for that purpose ? THOMAS E. WINNINGTON. 
Stanford Court, Worcester. 

THE LORD HIGH-ALMONER. In the "Tables 
of Precedency " given by Haydn in his Book of 
Dignities and Dictionary of Dates, I find no place 
assigned, nor even the name given, of the Lord 
High-Almoner. I believe that he is one of the 
chief officers of state or of the household, and 
shall be glad to know the precise point in the 
" Table of Precedence " to which his office enti- 
tles him. M. D. 

HTBERNATION or THE CUCKOO. Some of the 
readers of " N. & Q." may perhaps think that the 
following Query is more suited to the Field. Still 
I venture to propose it, as most Englishmen have 
more or less taste for natural history. It is to 
ask for any information as to the rearing of the 
cuckoo at home. I have now one in the house, 
taken from the nest last spring; it is now per- 
fectly well, and has already uttered the usual 
note of " cuckoo, cuckoo," three or four times. I 
am told that it is exceedingly rare to have this 
bird's life prolonged even thus far in our climate. 
FRANCIS TRENCH. 

Islip, near Oxford. 

SIR ROGER HOPTON. In temp. Hen. VII. he 
is said to have had a lease of the manor, &c., of 
Ackworth, near Pontefract, Yorkshire. He mar- 
ried Anne, daughter of Sir John Saville, of Thorn- 
hill. They both died in 1506. When the church 
at Ackworth was repaired, in 1852, their grave- 
stone was discovered; and having been turned 
.upside down, it was in excellent, preservation. I 
shall be much obliged if anyone can furnish me 
with authentic information as to their children. 
To save trouble, I may say that search for a will 
of Sir Roger Hopton has been made at York and 
London, and for an inquisition post mortem at the 
Record Office, without success. Perhaps some 
one has, or has access to, private deeds, &c., which 
may elucidate the subject. The accounts as to 
his family which I have seen differ. One is that 
he had two daughters, married respectively to 

Kiddal and Usleet. The other is, that 

he had three daughters: Alice, married to (1st) 
Sir Thomas Rockley, and (2ndly) to John Strey; 

Anne and [qu. Elizabeth], married to John 

Rayney. Which is correct ? C. J. 

HANNAH LIGHTFOOT. Did Hannah Lightfoot, 
the pretty Quakeress mentioned by Thackeray in 
his " Four Georges," marry Mr. Barnard, the 
king's librarian ; and if so, did she, after his death, 
marry again, and to whom ? * R. S. CHARXOCK. 

[* In our First and Second Series will be found eleven 
articles on the ultimate career of Hannah Lightfoot, but 
no satisfactory information was elicited respecting her 
after her marriage with Mr. Axford. ED.] 



3*d S. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



LONDON QUERIES. 1. Who was " the man on j 
wild Sombrero cast ? " He was an exhibition^ at 
Bartholomew Fair and elsewhere at the beginning t 
of this century. 

2. Where, near Westminster Hall, did Hender- 
son the author and bookseller reside ? 

3. Where, near the Fleet, did Simpson the 
bookseller reside? He published last dying 
speeches, &c. Any information respecting him 
or Henderson would be acceptable. 

4. Where did the Round House in Covent Gar- 
den stand ? When was it removed ? 

5. Where was Dyde and Scribe's shop ? Who 
was Lloyd Wardle, and who Jenky (1810) ? 

SIGMA-TAU. 

"MOT OF Louis LE GRAND. 

On salt la re'ponse de Louis XIV. a 1'arrogant Lord 
Stair: Monsieur, j'ai toujours ete le maitre chez moi, et 
quelquefois chez les autres; ne in'en faites pas sou- 
venir.' " 

On what occasion was this said ? H. S. G. 

OLD ENGRAVING. I have a copy of Selden De 
Dis Syris, Amst., 1681, in which a plate has been 
inserted opposite p. 25, " De Teraphim." It is 
nine inches in height, and I think it must have 
belonged to a larger volume, and have had about 
an inch cut off at the top. It represents a human 
figure with ass's ears : one leg in a buskin, the 
other with a cloven foot. One hand holds an un- 
folded scroll. Below is, 

" Risimus et nomen et formam." Tertull. 
From the remains of a letter or two, I think there 
was an inscription at the top. I do not think the 
figure a teraph. 

Can any of your readers tell me what it is, or 
from what book it is taken ? E. N. H. 

QUOTATIONS WANTED. 

(1.) " I had reposed 

The unalterable trust of my firm soul in Thee." 

(2.) " On verra au jour du jugement lequel de nous 
deux sera le plus noir." 

(3.) "The greatest virtues of men are only splendid 
sins." 

Augustine : the original words desired, with 
reference. 

(4.) " Many a man has run his head against a pulpit 
who might have done his country excellent service at 
the plough-tail." [Sydney Smith? *] 

(5.) When the future is all dark, 

And the past a troubled sea, 
And Memory sits in the heart, 
Wailing where Hope should be." 



[* " One man perhaps proves miserable in the study 

F the law, who might have flourished in that of physic 

or divinity. Another runs his head against the pulpit, 

who might have been very serviceable to his country at 

the plough." Dr. South, Sermon viii. vol. i. p. 133, ed. 



(6.) "The blessed damosel looked out 
From the gold bar of heaven ; 
Her blue deep eyes were deeper much 

Than a deep water even : 
She had three lilies in her hand, 

And the stars in her hair were seven." 
(7.) " It is not alone that Time is stealing 

Our beauty and strength as our lives decay ; 
It is that the passionate feeling 

Of youth, with youth must pass away; 
It is that the spoiler hath power to stifle 
Each emotion we feel in an earlier day." 

HERMENTRUDE. 

FAMILT or DE SCURTH, OR DE SCUR In the 
list of donations to various religious houses in the 
eastern parts of Yorkshire, published in Burton's 
Monasticon Eboracense, I find that Hugh, son of 
Ralph de Scurtb, or Scorth, and Emma his wife, 
gave a piece of land at Drax to the Priory of 
Heatham, " named also Drax, or Houm." 

In the register of lands at Acclom, the property 
of the Priory of Bridlington, it is stated that 

" Robert de Scur gave two oxgangs of land here, in 
exchange for four oxgangs of land at Kiston, which 
Ansketil their grandfather gave to the Church, and 
which Wm. de Scur, brother of Kobert, confirmed ; and a 
toft that had belonged to Alan his father, with an acre 
of land and common pasture in the same village, with 
the site of a mill here." 

The name of Nicolas de Schur occurs in the 
list of donations here. 

It seems probable that the persons mentioned 
belonged to the same family, though their names 
are spelt with a slight difference. Can any of 
your correspondents, acquainted with the antiqui- 
ties of the eastern parts of Yorkshire, give me 
any further account of this family ? As I am 
anxious to recover as much as possible concerning 
the De Scurs, I shall be very glad to receive any 
particulars concerning their history, genealogy, 
&c., if any such can be made out. 

I cannot find any arms ascribed to them in any 
heraldic collection. As they may possibly yet be 
recovered from some Yorkshire church, or some 
antiquarian collection, I shall be much obliged to 
any one who can furnish me with them. 

I shall be glad also to know the derivation of 
the name, and whether it now exists in any form 
in the northern counties ? 

In the Catalogue of Prioresses of Yeddington, 
I find that Margaretta Scard was Prioress about 
1239. Has this name any connection with that 
of De Scur ? 

The names of Scarth, Le Scurth, and ^ Scard, 
occur as names of places in the lists of inferior 
houses, donations, &c., in these parts of Yorkshire. 

R. S. T. 

BRITISH SURNAMES. Information as to the 
titles and respective merits of works on the above 
subject will be thankfully received by 

ST. SWITHIN. 



90 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. JAN. 31, 



_ LOCAL SURNAMES. I am preparing for pub 
lication a list of surnames, with the county or dis 
trict in which each name most abounds. I have 
localised about two thousand names, and shoulc 
be glad to increase my list, or test the accuracy o 
the information I have already obtained, by re- 
ceiving communications, to the subjoined address 
from any of your subscribers who may hav< 
noticed any particular surname to prevail in anj 
county or district. GEO. BUEGESS. 

18, Lincoln Street, Bow Road, London, E. 

WATSON, COENHILL, LONDON, 1693. Who is 
Mr. Watson, who is living " at his house, att ye 
signe of ye Red Lyon in Cornhill " 1693 ? 2. 0. 

WINE. Can any of your correspondents refer 
me to the best authorities for finding out the fol- 



lowing ? 



What were the component parts of the wine of 
the patriarchal times ? 

Of what materials, and how made up, the na- 
tural wines in the time of our Lord .and His 
Apostles ? 

What kind, and how composed, were the wines 
used in the subsequent centuries of the Church ? 

When did the various kinds of drink become 
alcoholic ? And the date of the origin of the pro- 
cesses of distillation and fermentation ? 

JAMES GILBEET. 
2, Devonshire Grove, Old Kent Road. 



SAMUEL WESLEY. In looking over some old 
books, a few days ago, I found 

" A History of the New Testament, representing the 
Actions and Miracles of our Blessed Lord and his Apos- 
tles, attempted inverse, and adorned with 152 sculptures. 
Written by Samuel Wesley, A.M., Chaplain to his Grace 
John, Duke of Buckingham, and author of The Life of 
Lhnst, an Heroic Poem. The cuts done by J. Sturt, 12mo 
Third edition. London : Thomas Ward, 1717." 

It appears from the dedication, addressed to 
the Marchioness of Normanby, to whom also he 
was chaplain at the time, that the author had en- 
joyed the patronage of Queen Anne. It would 
also seem from this dedication that he had not 
been brought within the influence of a court with- 
out imbibing somewhat of a courtierly tempera- 
ment. After bitterly lamenting the loss of his 
royal patroness, he adds : 

"Something I have, at last, to alleviate this grief: 
though nothing can wholly efface it. The Queen's dead, 
nU * , f% M v ar ^ hione8s of Normanby lives; and I doubt 
patronesse 8 ' " ** envey ' d the rare ha PP in ess of two such 

After some other compliments, certainly high 
flown, according to the custom of the times, but 
very gracefully expressed, he signs himself Your 
ladyship s Chaplain and Servant, Sam. Wesley " 



Was this Sam. Wesley the father of the founder 
of Methodism ? C. W. 

[The individual inquired after was Samuel Wesley, the 
father of John and Charles, the two celebrated Methodist 
preachers. The elder Samuel Wesley was born at Win- 
terborn Whitchurch, in Dorsetshire, and was educated 
first among the dissenters, whom he soon left, and ad- 
mitted a servitor, at the age of eighteen, of Exeter Col- 
lege, Oxford, in 1684. On taking orders, he obtained the 
rectory of South Ormesby, co. Lincoln, and afterwards 
that of Epworth in the same county. He was chaplain 
also to the Marquis of Normanby, afterwards Duke of 
Buckingham, and died April 25, 1735. He was a very 
voluminous writer, having published, besides other things, 
Maggots, or Poems on Several Subjects, 8vo, 1685 ; The 
Life of Christ, an Heroic Poem, fol. 1693, 1697 ; The His- 
tory of the New Testament in Verse, 12mo, 1701; A 
Treatise on the Sacrament, and Dissertationes in Librum 
Jobi. Dr. SacheverelPs celebrated Speech before the 
House of Lords was composed by Samuel Wesley, as his 
son John informs us in his History of England. His 
poetry, which is very common-place, incurred the cen- 
sure of Garth in his Dispensary : 

" Had Wesley never aim'd in verse to please, 
We had not rank'd him with our Ogilbys. 
Still censures will on dull pretenders fall : 
A Codrus should expect a Juvenal." 

And his eldest son Samuel wisely remarks that his father 
wrote many things in verse 

" With Vida's piety, though not his fire." 

Alex. Pope, in a letter to Dean Swift, April 12, 1730* 
says, " I shall think it a kindness done myself if you can 
propagate Mr. Wesley's subscription for his Commentary 
on Job among your Divines (Bishops excepted, of whom 
there is no hope), and among such as are believers or 
readers of Scripture. Even the curious may find some- 
thing to please them, if they scorn to be edified. It has 
seen the labour of eight years of this learned man's life ; 
[ call him what he is, a learned man, and I engage you will 
approve his prose more than you formerly could his 
poetry. Lord Bolingbroke is a favourer of it, and allows 
you to do your best to serve an old Tory, and a sufferer for 
he Church of England, though you are a Whig, as I am." 
There is a curious notice of Samuel Wesley in Dunton's 
Life and Errors, ed. 1818, i. 163; consult also Nichols's 
Literary Anecdotes, v. 212; Nichols's Collection of Poems, 
vii. 98; Birch's Life of Alp. Tillotson, ed. 1753, pp. 307, 
S42; and Granger's History of England, ed. 1775, iv. 

f " THE INTELLIGENCES," ETC. I have a small- 
ized 4to volume (pp. 1178, 72), printed in Lon- 
don, and entitled The Intelligencer, published for 
Satisfaction and Information of the People, com' 
mencing with the number for Monday, January 
"!, 166, and ending with that for Thursday, De- 
ember 28, 1665. Was this old newspaper edited 
y Roger L'Estrange ? and how many volumes 
ppeared ? Each year, so far as I know, begins 
rith "Number 1." 

There are many very curious particulars of 
Valentine Greatrakes, and some strange scraps of 
Irish intelligence. Let me trouble you with a 
specimen : 

" Dublin, May 6. We have had here upon the Strand 
several Races; but the most remarkable was by the 
Kings-end Coaches (which is an odde kinde of Carre, and 









3** S. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUEEIES. 



91 



generally used in this countrey.) There were a matter 
of 25 of them, and his Excellency the Lord-Deputy 
[Thomas Earl of Ossory] bestowed a piece of Plate upon 
him that won the Race, and the second, third, and 
fourth were rewarded with money. It is a new institu- 
tion, and likely to become an annual custom; for the 
humour of it gave much satisfaction, there being at least 
5000 spectators." The Intelligencer, May 15, 1665. 

Twenty-five Ringsend cars running a race must 
indeed have been " an odde kinde " of spectacle ; 
and I shall be glad to know whether there is any 
record of its having become " an annual custom." 
Bush, in his Hibernia Curiosa, p. 25 (London, 
1769), gives a rude sketch of the vehicle. 

ABHBA. 

[On the appointment of that Prince of Journalists, Sir 
Roger L'Estrange, in 1663, to his newly-created office of 
" Surveyor of the Imprimery and Printing-presses," 
Henry Muddiman's Parliamentary Intelligencer was con- 
strained to give place to its more loyal successor, The 
Intelligencer, published for the Satisfaction and Informa- 
tion of the People, with Privilege. The first number is 
dated 31st August, 1663. Pepys thus notices its appear- 
ance. " Sept. 4. To Westminster Hall, and there bought 
the first news-book of L'Estrange's writing, he begin- 
ning this week; and makes, methinks, but a simple 
beginning." The Intelligencer continued to be published 
every Monday till the beginning of January, 1665-6, 
when the publication of L'Estrange was superseded by 
The Gazette. Nichols (Literary Anecdotes, iv. 58) states, 
that " it is but justice to add, that L'Estrange's papers 
[The Intelligencer and The Neves'] contained more infor- 
mation, more entertainment, and more advertisements of 
importance, than any succeeding paper whatever, previ- 
ous to the golden age of letters, which may be said to 
have commenced in the reign of Queen Anne."} 

A LADY MARRIED BY MISTAKE. In the latter 
part of the last century, Mr. Haussouiller, a 
French Jew, married a Miss Trist of Totnes, an 
heiress. It appears, however, that he thought her 
to be the daughter of a gentleman of London of 
that name, and did not find out his error till 
after the marriage knot was tied. Where can I 
read the best account of this curious circumstance, 
and what became of this happy couple ? 

JOHN TUCKETT. 

Great Russell Street. 

[Lewis John Marie Haussoullier, a French Jew, was 
one of the fortune-hunters of the last century. He dined 
with others at Richardson's Coffee-house, in Covent Gar- 
den, Jan. 18, 1796, and drew a cheque for 21Z. upon Messrs. 
Hammersley, for which Mr. Richardson gave him the 
balance, which enabled him to set off with his most par- 
ticular friend, Gilrary Pigott, to Bath, in pursuit of Miss 
Inst, the only child of a tailor in Surrey Street, Strand, 
supposed heiress to 40,OOOZ. On his arrival at Bath, he 
earned off Miss Trist, arid married her at Gretna Green ; 
but on his return he found out it was not the object of 
his pursuit, but Miss E. Ashford Trist, of Totnes, a young 
lady of good fortune, though not equal to the object of 
His pursuit. He was naturalised in 1797 ; sold all her 
states, broke the heart of his wife, and became as poor 
as ever. In 1811, he was stated to have been concerned 
m the noisoniner of the horses at Newmarket. See An 



A - ft* 6 iiviooo at i-Ncwuiarnet. oee All 

Act of Parliament for Confirming a Petition between 
Lewis John Marie Haussoullier, Esq. and Tryphena Trist, 



Spinster, an Infant, of divers Manors, Boroughs, Lands, 
Hereditaments, at Totnes, &c. in Devonshire, 1799." The 
estates are very extensive and fully described.] 

LIGHTNING. In what work does Fuller give 
" a list of thirteen abbeys and monasteries which 
had been destroyed by lightning down to his time, 
about two centuries ago?" This was written in 
1851, but the author has not put any reference. 
If any reader can supply the above, perhaps he 
would not object to copy the list at the same time, 
as desirable for your pages. W. P. 

[The passage on the "ominous burning of abbeys, 
often by lightning," is in Fuller's Church History, book 
vi. sect. ii. 3, 4. He says, " We will conclude with their 
observation, as an ominous presage of abbeys' ruin, that 
there was scarce a great abbey in England which (once 
at the least) was not burned down with lightning from 
heaven. 1. The monastery of .Canterbury was burned 
anno 1145 ; and again anno 1174. 2. The abbey of Croy- 
land twice burned. 3. The abbey of Peterborough twice 
set on fire. 4. The abbey of St. Mary's in York burned. 
5. The abbey of Norwich burned. 6. The abbey of St. 
Edmond's Bury burned and destroyed. 7. The abbey of 
Worcester burned. 8. The abbey of Gloucester was also 
burned. 9. The abbey of Chichester burned. 10. The 
abbey of Glastonbury burned. 11. The abbey of St. 
Mary in South wark burned. 12. The church of the 
abbey of Beverley burned. 13. The steeple of the abbey 
of Eversham burned." Fuller adds, "I will not, with 
Master Fox, infer from such casualties, that God was 
more offended with abbeys than other buildings, a natural 
cause presenting itself of such accidents."] 

WHIST. Can you inform me when the game 
of whist was invented and by whom ? I think 
Horace Walpole, who lived in the ^first society, 
calls it whisk, which is now a vulgarism. Which 
is the right name, and what does it mean ? 

PHILIP GRIFFITH. 

[Whist, or hist, hust, hush, that is, silence. It was for- 
merly spelt whisk. Little is known of the origin of the 
game. It is first mentioned by English writers at the 
commencement of the seventeenth century. The Water 
Poet speaks of 

' Ruffe, slam, trump, noddy, whisk, hole, sant, new-cut, 
Unto the keeping of foure knaves he'l put." 

Taylor's Workes, 1650. 

Farquhar, in his Beaux Stratagem, 1706, makes Mrs. 
Sullen thus apostrophise the delights of rural life : 
" Country pleasures ! racks and torments ! Dost think, 
child, that my limbs are made for leaping of ditches, 
and clainbring over stiles ; or that my parents, wisely 
foreseeing my future happiness in country pleasures, had 
early instructed me in the rural accomplishments of drink- 
ng fat ale, playing at whisk, and smoking tobacco with 
my husband?" In 1715, Pope thus addressed Martha 
Blount in one of his Epistles : 
; Some squire, perhaps, you take delight to rack, 
Whose game is whist : whose drink, a toast in sack : 
Whose laughs are hearty, though his jests are coarse: 
Who loves you best of all things but his horse." 

Swift, in 1728, alludes to the game as a favourite pastime 
or clergymen. He says, " The clergymen used to play at 
ohisk and swabbers."] 



92 



NOTES AND QUEK1ES. 



[3i S. IIL JAN. 31, '63. 



ANONYMOUS WORKS: EUBULUS: ROMISH 
RYME. 

(3 rd S. ii. 448, 515, 517.) 

As your correspondents have confined their 
questions and answers to Eubulus, and Bishop 
Forbes' claim to its authorship, I think there is 
still room for a Note upon the general subject of 
this Romish Ryme, and its earlier confuters. 
Rugged Rymes, in the early days of the Reforma- 
tion, seems to have been a favourite mode of 
attacking the gospellers. When the priests re- 
covered their ascendency, for example, in the reign 
of Mary, one Miles Huggard put forth a Rugged 
Ryme, in which he marshals the names and 
opinions of all the heretical captains who led the 
assault upon holy church ; which was answered, 
but more particularly by Rob Crowley, who, by 
introducing the wicked ballad in portions, repro- 
duced it in a strong setting of protestaut prose 
and verse in 1548. I notice this work, as it 
appears to have been the model for the confuters 
of the more modern Rymes of Elizabeth's latter 
days, and has by mistake been called one of the 
answers thereto. 

Through the whole of this queen's reign the 
Rugged Ryme seems to have been greatly relied 
upon by the propaganda of the old faith : and 
we find many curious particulars regarding both 
attacks and defences of this kind in Collier's Ex- 
tracts from the Stationers' Registers. 

Coming now to the particular libell which was 
cast abroad with a view to unsettle the kingdom on 
the death of Elizabeth, and accession of a staunch 
Protestant successor, I find it interwoven in 
Crowley's fashion, in the following : 

" An Answere to a Popish Ryme lately printed, and 
entitled a proper New Ballad, wherein are contayned 
Catholike Questions to the Protestant. The which 
ballad was put forth without date or day, name of Au- 
thor, or printer, Libell-like scattered and sent abroad to 
withdraw the Simple from the Fayth of Christ, vnto the 
Doctrine of Antichrist, the Pope of Rome. Written by 
that Protestant Catholike I. R. 4. Impr. by S. Stafford, 

This literary curiosity I have not seen, but con- 
sider it rightly adjudged to John Rhodes. In the 
British Museum there is a remarkable poetical 
volume, entitled : 

" A Briefe sum of the Treasons intended against the 
King and State when they shoulde have been assembled 
in Parliament, Nov. 5, 1605, &c. &c. By I. R. extended 
in the book John Rhodes, Minister." 

This does not, it is true, contain the Answere to 
the Romish Ryme printed under these initials in 
1602, but inferential proof that Rhodes was the 
author of both ; for he carries on his war with 
the Papists in this book of 1605, and may be sup- 



posed to refer to a former attempt of his to silence 
the enemy when he there says 

" Some three years since your questions, put in rime, 
Were answered all according to the time." 

This would appear to remove any doubt re- 
garding the initials I. R., and settle the point in 
favour of Rhodes. The work of 1605 contains 
some curious details respecting the proceedings of 
Papists in disseminating their libells for the seduc- 
ing of the ignorant. Master Rhodes, who seems 
to have been the "Parson of Enborne, in Berk- 
shire," gives 

" A True Coppye of the rayling Libell, left or cast into 
the Church of Enborne, as I received the same: The 
Superscription in Prose ' To the Parson of E. give this 
with Speede : ' A Postscript under the superscription: 'The 
Carryer is paid already, as much as he looketh for, and 
so it shall cost you nothing but the reading : and would 
you have it better cheape ?' The Tytle, or inscription: 
' To the heretical Parson of Enborne our commendation, 
wishing him Catholique mind, or no Saluation.' " 

His banter is a further proof that Rhodes had 
made himself obnoxious to the ballad scatterers ; 
and with reference to the personal attack alluded 
to, the author, in bringing his book to an abrupt 
close, informs his readers " that he is driven to 
leave off before the Second Execution of Tray- 
tors, but that the second part of the book will be 
shortly printed, when thou shalt have my Answere 
to this Rayling Libell," which, if published, shows 
that the Protestant champion did battle twice with 
the Romish ballad-mongers. Rhodes's Answere 
has been republished of late years, as already 
shown, but Farr has omitted the prose address to 
the reader, reprinted in a short notice of the book 
in Cens. Literaria, vol. viii., an extract from 
which may not be unacceptable. The author says, 
in a search with others, for books 

"We found a toy in rime, entitled A Proper New 
Ballad, fyc. Onely of zeal to the trueth, and loue to such 
simple soules as might be snared with such pretty bayts 
as this ballad, I have taken a little paynes in answering 
the same as well as I could, being a man of small skill 
to meddle in greater matters. There are many ^uch. 
pamphletts, together with other like Romish ware, that 
are sent abroad among the common people, both Protes- 
tant and Papist, in London and in the Countrey, and that 
by certaine women, brokers, and pedlars, who, with 
baskets on their armes, shall come and offer you other 
wares vnder a colour, and so sell you these where they 
see and know any likelyhood to vtter them." 

He goes on to say 

" I founde it set to no certaine tune : but because it 
goeth most neere to the olde tune of Lalandashot, there 
fore I have made that all may be sung to that tune if 
neede be." 

Consequently we have the following heading : 
" A pretty fine Answere to a Romish Rime, en- 
titled A proper Newe Ballad to the tune of Lalan- 
dashot" 

Having said thus much of Rhodes, I now come 
to Hieron. Lowndes, it appears to me, has by 






3*4 S. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



93 



listake assigned I. R.'s Ansivere, 1602, to our 
scond champion in the Protestant lists, whose 
ook bears the following title : 

An Answere to a Popish Ryme lately Scattered 
broad, in the west parts, and much relyed vpon by some 
imply Seduced. By Sam 1 Hieron, Minister of the Word 
f God, at Modbury, Devon, 4, S. Stafford, 1604." 

This, which is a far more extended reply than 
hat of Rhodes, was reprinted, and bears " 2nd 
dition " on the title, 4to, H. L. for S. Masedan, 
608. In the latter, the author has an Address to 
he Reader apologising for his muse, and intimat- 
ag that when he first published his Answere he 
ras warned that another hand had been before 
im in confuting the Papist, which, of course, 
lludes to Rhodes in 1602, and completes the ob- 
jct I had in view in showing that the three names 
uoted by BIBLIOTHECAR. CHETHAM. were three 
adependent writers upon the subject in question. 

In conclusion, I would observe that these ques- 
ions to the Protestants comprise fifty-one four- 
ne stanzas, embracing all the strong points of 
lomish doctrine, under the headings " Catholike," 

Prophets," " Continuance," " Visible," " Vnity," 

Holy," and " Heretikes," answered by Hieron 
i less than 227 of the like stanzas under the 
anie heads ! Besides this poetical handling of his 
pponent, the minister of Modbury cuts off about 
ne-third of his page where the obnoxious Ryme 
ccurs, for comments and texts subversive of the 
tapal teachings of the defiant ballads. J. O. 



WHO WAS NEVILL SIMMONS? 
(3 rd S. ii. 440.) 

The REV. E. BRADLEY wants " any works or 
>roadsheets by Richard Baxter, printed for Nevill 
Symmonds of Keder minster, 1640-60." 

During a search after books printed in Sheffield 
n the last century, a few bearing the name of 
STevill Simmons, in Kederminster, London, and 
Sheffield, ranging in date from 1656 to 1724, have 
alien into my hands. The name of Simmons 
sither S. or Mr. Simmons appears, however, as 
hat of a bookseller and stationer in Sheffield 
ratil 1755, but never of a printer. The last Ne- 
.'ill Simmons died five or six years before the date 
)f the earliest Sheffield printed book which I have 
-'et seen. 

I subjoin a list of books, bearing the name of 
simmons (with one exception), in my possession ; 
ind shall be obliged for any information respect- 
ng that family, as well as for any notice of books 
irinted in Sheffield in the early part of the last 
lentury, or of the commencement of printing in 

1. Wanted "Any Works or Broadsheets by Richard 
7^> te c r A P rinted f r Nevitt Symmonds of Kederminster, 
.640-60." N. & Q Nov. 29, 1862. 



2. Gildas Salvianus, the Reformed Pastor, by Richard 
Baxter, Teacher of the Church at Kederminster. Lon- 
don : Printed by Robert White for Nevil Simmons, Book- 
seller at Kederminster; and are to be sold by William 
Roybould at the Unicorn, in Paul's Churchyard. 1656. 

3. The Divine Life in Three Treatises, by Richard 
Baxter. London: Printed for Francis Tyton, at the 
three Daggers in Fleet Street, and Nevil Simmons, Book- 
seller in Kederminster. 1664. 

4. A Discourse upon prodigious Abstinence, occasioned 
by the twelve Months' fasting of Martha Taylor, the 
famed Derbyshire Damsel, &e. &c., by John Reynolds. 
Humbly offered to the Royal Society. London : Printed 
by R. W. for Nevil Simmons at the signe of the three 
Crowns, near Holbourn Conduit, and Mr. Dorman New- 
man, at the Surgeon's Arms in Little Britain. 1669. 

[I have not seen this book, bat copied the title from 
an old Review I think.] 

5. The Life of Faith, by Richard Baxter. London: 
Printed by R. W. for Nevill Simmons, at the Three 
Crowns over against Holborn Conduit. 1670. 

6. Richard Baxter's Catholick Theologie, Plain, Pure, 
Peaceable, for Pacification of the Dogmatical Word War- 
riours. London: Printed by Robert White for Nevill 
Simmons, at the Prince's Arms in St. Paul's Churchyard. 
1675. 

7. Methodus Theologize Christianas, &c. &c., per Richar- 
dum Baxterum Philotheologum. (On the engraved 
title-page) London : Printed for Nevill Simmons at the 
Prince's Arms, in St. Paul's Churchyard. 1677. Im- 
primatur dated Aug. 25th, 1678. (Title-page.) Londini: 
Typis M. White et T. Snowden, et prostant Venales 
apud Nevil Simmons ad Insigne Trium Gallorum en Vico 
Ludgate prope Templum Paulinum. 1681. 

8. Trading Spiritualized, &c. &c., by Wm. Bagshaw 
(Parts 1 and 2, Printed for Thomas Parkhurst in Cheap- 
side, 1694 and 1695.) Part 3. Lonon (sic) : Printed for 
Nevill Symonds, Bookseller in Sheffield, in Yorkshire. 
1696. Part 4. London: Printed for Nevill Symonds, 
Bookseller in Sheffield, in Yorkshire. 1696. 

9. De Spiritualibus Pecci. Notes (or Notices) con- 
cerning the Works of God, and some of those who have 
been workers together with God, in the Hundred of the 
High Peak in Derbyshire, by W. Bagshaw. London: 
Printed for Nevill Simmons, Bookseller in Sheffield. 1702. 

10. Three Discourses by the Reverend Mr. Clement 
Ellis, Rector of Kirby and Prebendary of Southwell. 
London: Printed for Nevill Simmons, and to be sold by 
Thomas Parkhurst in Cheapside, J. Robinson and J. Tay- 
lor in St. Paul's Churchyard. 1704. 

11. Funeral Sermon occasioned by the death of the late 
Reverend and Learned Mr. John de la Rose of Sheffield, 
who departed this life Dec. 31, 1723, by Richard Bateson. 
London: Printed for John Clarke, at the Bible and 
Crown in the Poultry, near Cheapside, and Sold by 
Nevill Symmonds of Sheffield, &c. &c. 1724. 

[Here ends the name of Nevill.] 

12. A Sermon preached at an Assembly of Ministers at 
the High Pavement in Nottingham, June 28, 1738, by J. 
Clegg, V.D.M., M.D. Nottingham : Printed by Thomas 
Collyer and Sold by J. Roe in Derby, S. Simmons in 
Sheffield, and J. Slater in Chesterfield. 1738. 

13. Amongst the agents for the sale of Homfray's 
Sheffield Weekly Journal, and also, when in the same 
year (1755) the name of the Doncaster Flying Post was 
added to its original title, is the name of Mr. Simmons. 

14. In an Assessment made in Sheffield according to an 
Act of Parliament for raising Mone} T by a Poll, for carry- 
ing on a vigorous War with France in 1692, appears 



94 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'* S. III. JAX. 31, '63. 



Nevill Symonds and wife - 
2 children - 



*. d. 

8 
8 



15. Copy of an inscription in the chancel of the parish 
church, Sheffield : 

"Here lyeth the body of Ruth, late wife of Nevill 
Simmons, interred y e 25 th of December, 1707, aged 41. 
She left 4 sons and 5 Daughters. 

" Nevill, their 2<i Son, died June y e 11, 1730, aged 37. 

"Elizabeth, their third Daughter, died May 13,1755, 
aged 56 years." 

16. Timothy Jollie, born 21 Aug., bapt. 1 Sept. 1691, 
for a time one of the Ministers of the Upper Chapel, but 
removed to London, where he died Aug. 1757, married 
Mary, daughter of Nevil Simmons of Sheffield, stationer 
and bookseller, Oct. 19, 1714. She died Dec. 9, 1761, aged 
70, and was interred in the Lower Meeting-yard, Shef- 
field. 

[They had eight children: one, named Nevil Jollie, 
died set. 12.] 

17. In Literary Anecdotes, vol. iii. p. 443, is mention of 
James Simmons of Canterbury, printer and bookseller, 
who became M.P. for that city in 1806, and died 1807. In 
the same vol. p. 687, Simmonds of Blandford, a booksel- 
ler, is named, who died in 1801, set. 82. 

I find no record of Nevili Simmons, the hus- 
band of Ruth, in the parish registers. 

HENRY JACKSON. 

Sheffield. 



CHRISTMAS CAROLS. 
(3 rd S. iii. 6, 59.) 

The subject which has been opened by your 
correspondent A. A. is very curious, and deserves 
further investigation and illustration. 

Many ancient Christmas carols have already 
been published. I believe the very earliest which 
is known to have been published dates from the 
year 1521. It is now in the Bodleian Library, 
and consists of two carols. One is named " A 
Carrol of huntynge," which is reprinted in Ber- 
ner's Boke of St. Alban's ; the other is styled " A 
Carrol, bringing in the Bore's head." This used 
to be sung, and perhaps is still, in Queen's Col- 
lege, Oxford, to the chant of one of the Psalms. 

The Bibliographical Miscellanies (Oxford, 1813, 
4to) contains seven carols from a collection in 
one volume, belonging to Christ Church College, 
Oxford, " Imprinted at London, in the Powltry, 
by Richard Kele, "dwelynge at the longe Shop 
under Saynt Myldrede's Church." The date is 
unknown. 

The custom of singing carols seems to have 
been very common on the Continent, as well as 
in England, Ireland, and Scotland. 

I send you a scrap of an ancient German carol : 
" Ein Kindlein so lobelich, 
1st uns gebohren heute, 
Von einer Jungfrau reiniglich 
/urn Trost una armen Leuten : 
War uns das Kindlein nicht gebohrn, 
J>o waren wir allzumahl verlohrn, 



Das Heil ist unser aller. 
Ey du susser Jesu Christ, 
Weil fur uns Mensch worden bist, 
Behut uns fur die Holle." 

See Christliches Gesangbuch, p. 36. 

Bo wring, in his Ancient Poetry and Romances o 
Spain (ed. London, 1824), gives a few Spam's 
carols, beginning with the words " Llevadmt 
Nino, >L Belen." 

" Carry me, Babe ! to Bethlem now, 

For I would look on Thee, my God ! 
Thou art alone my goal and Thou, 
Thou to that goal the only road." 

Another curious one is given at p. 178. I 
begins thus : " Pues en esta feliz noche." 
" In such a marvellous night, so fair, 

And full of wonders strange and new ; 
Ye shepherds of the vale declare 

Who saw the greatest wonder ? Who ? 
u First. ' I saw the trembling fire look wan.' 
Second. * I saw the sun shed tears of blood.' 
Third. ' I saw a God become a Man.' 
Fourth. ' I saw a man become a God.' 
" O wond'rous marvels ! at the thought, 

The bosom's awe and reverence move ; 
But who such prodigies hath wrought? 

What gave such wonders birth ? 'Twas Love. 
" Yes ! love hath wrought, and love alone, 

The victories all beneath above ; 
And earth and heaven shall shout, as one, 
The all-triumphant song of love." 

There are several collections of old carols i 
French, which are published in a scarce worj 
entitled, Noels Nouveaux sur les Chants w 
Noels Anciens, notez pour en faciliter le Chan\ 
par M. 1'Abbe Pellegrin. (Paris, 1785, 8vo.) 

Have any of your readers a copy of the folj 
lowing odd title of a Christmas Carol ? 

" A Christmas Carol on Peko-Tea ; or, a Sacred Caro 
which, like Tea that is perfectly good and fine, will t 
most grateful and useful all the year round, from Chris! 
mas to Christmas for ever. Humbly addressed to Quee 
Caroline, and the Princess Carolina, and all the Royj 
Family." By Francis Hoffman, London, 1722, 8vo. 

The two verses quoted by F. C. H. beginni 
" As I sot on> Sonday bonk," &c. 

form the commencement of a carol which 
still printed in London, or at least used to 
some years ago ; for I have an alphabetical 
of Christmas carols, which have been publi 
to be sung by old and young in the street! 
Amongst these come the lines referred to above. 
I have only seen the first verse of a carol, whi< 
used to be sung in Warwickshire, which 
begins : 

" As I passed by a river side, 

And there as I did rein (run), 
In argument I chanced to hear 
A Carnal and a Crane." 

But I conclude, lest I should occupy too m 
of your space. J. DALTO 



3i S. III. JAN. 31, 'C3.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



95 



DERIVATION OF HACKNEY." 
(3 rd S. ii. 335, 378.) 

Some time ago I took great pains to endeavour 
3 find the origin of this word. The earliest use 
f it (unless the Tournament of Tottenham be 
Ider, which is very improbable), I believe to be 
i Chaucer's Romaunt of the Rose. Riches is 
here described as accompanied by a young man, 
rho, among other luxuries, 

loved well to have hors of prise ; 

He wend to have reproved be 

Of theft or murder, if that he 

Had in his stable an hacknay," &c. 

In Miege's Dictionary, the English word " hack- 
ey " is interpreted " cheval de louage," the 
Yench " haquenee," an ambling horse ; and " pas 
'haquenee," an ambling pace. The glossary to 
he black letter Chaucer (1687), on the contrary, 
ays " hackeney," a trotting horse. Of course I 
eferred immediately to the passage in the original 
Ionian de la Rose (1125, &c.), from which Chau- 
er has translated almost line for line : 
11 Si avoit des chevaulx de pris, 

Bien east cuide estre repris 

De meurtre ou de larrecin 

S'en son estable n'eust roucin." 

The glossary to this last-named work simply 
ives " roucin, cheval," but that appended to the 
xce) lent Pantheon Rabelais, says "Roussin, roucin, 
heval de service, a 1'usage des domestiques ; et, 
ar consequent, fort inferieur au coursier ou 
_extrier." It is clear Guillaume de Lorris and 
ean de Meun, and also Chaucer and Miege, mean 
n inferior sort of horse ; but there is nothing in 
bese authors to intimate a hireling. 

The town of Hackney has always been asso- 
iated with hired horses by two opposite tradi- 
ions. One, that it was so named because many 
^ondoners visited it on "hackney" or hired 
orses; the other, that such horses were so named 
fter the town for the like reason. If the latter 
e correct, the French must have borrowed their 
arm " haquenee " from us. They have done so 
ince with the words "trot," "jockey," "sport," 
nd several^more ; but it may be questioned whe- 
ber they did so at such an early period. If the 
Drmer be true, the place must have given its 
ame to the horses at least as early as Chaucer's 
ime. Our Anglo-Saxon forefathers were accus- 
3med to name their towns from their natural 
>cal peculiarities. The knoll rising from the 
ale, the marshy pool, the wood jutting out of the 
indy ground, the landing-place, any such cir- 
umstances have given names to thousands of 
>cahties, which retain them to this day as 
lolmsdale, Merton, Sandhurst, Greenhithe, and a 
ost of others testify. I believe all must agree 
iat Hackney has certainly a strong Anglo-Saxon 



sound with it. The present visitor would be 
wholly at a loss to find anything there which 
existed in olden times, unless he went to the ham- 
let of Homerton, which still stands on the holme 
or rising ground overlooking the vale of the Lea, 
which, before the Bromley Lock was made, was a 
"mere" or pool at every tide, and therefore might 
very properly still be called Holm-mere-town, or 
the town on the rising ground close to the mere. 
Scarce a hundred years ago the case was very 
different as to Hackney proper, or Old Hackney as 
it is now called. The Londoner started then from 
Shoreditch church, and went to Hackney across 
pleasant open fields, a walk of little more than a 
mile and a half. It was then a village, across the 
main street of which a bright clear brook flowed. 
It was, in fact, the confluence of two streams, 
one coming at the west from Dalston, and the 
other northward from Stamford Hill and Horn- 
sey. In flood times it was scarcely fordable ; and, 
though now its contents are discharged through 
the new gigantic sewer, and are lost to sight, it 
was then a conspicuous object. A curious rhym- 
ing MS. account of the visit of some ringers to try 
Hackney bells, now in Guildhall, says it was 
famous for 

" Roach and gudgeon, dace, and eels." 

And it must have been a pleasant sight to " one 
long in populous cities pent." Now if this divided 
brook gave the name to the place, it might have 
suggested to the Anglo-Saxon the appellation of 
" Haccan-ey," or the " cut " or " separated " run- 
ning water. It would have been the first con- 
spicuous object which met his view. Of course 
any such vague conjecture as this is too weak a 
matter for any theory to depend on ; but some- 
times these suggestions do the service of straws 
thrown up, " to show which way the wind blows." 
I should be very glad to know from your 
readers whether there is any mention of the word 
" hackney," meaning an inferior horse, earlier than 
the one I have quoted from Chaucer ? How early 
can the French word " haquenee " be traced, and 
what is supposed to be its derivation ? How 
early can the term " hackney " be found clearly 
associated with a hired horse or vehicle ? Is there 
any cognate word in French signifying hiring ? 
And, particularly, is there any mention of Hack- 
ney as a place anterior to the time of the Knights 
Templars who had the manor ? A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 



BOSCOBEL OAK. 
(3 rd S. iii. 46.) 

In Shaw's Staffordshire : General History (vol. i. 
p. 74), a long extract is given from The Book of 
Boscobel ; and at p. 80, we have : 



94 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[S S. III. JAX. 31, '63. 



t. d. 
8 
8 



Nevill Symonds and wife - 
2 children - 
15. Copy of an inscription in the chancel of the parish 

C "Here lyeth the body of Ruth, late wife of Xevill 
Simmons, interred y c 25* of December, 1707, aged 41. 
She left 4 sons and 5 Daughters. 

" Xevill, their 2'"' Son, died June y e 11, 1730, aged 37. 

"Elizabeth, their third Daughter, died May 13,1755, 

1C. Timothy Jollie, born 21 Aug., bapt. 1 Sept. 1691, 
for a time one of the Ministers of the Upper Chapel, but 
removed to London, where he died Aug. 1757, married 
Marv, daughter of Nevil Simmons of Sheffield, stationer 
and "bookseller, Oct. 19, 1714. She died Dec. 9, 1761, aged 
70, and was interred in the Lower Meeting-yard, Shef- 
field. 

[They had eight children; one, named Nevil Jollie, 
died at. 12.] 

17. In Literary Anecdotes, vol. iii. p. 443, is mention of 
James Simmons of Canterbury, printer and bookseller, 
who became M.P. for that city in 1806, and died 1807. In 
the same vol. p. 687, Simmonds of Blandford, a booksel- 
ler, is named, who died in 1801, t. 82. 

I find no record of Nevill Simmons, the hus- 
band of Ruth, in the parish registers. 

HENRY JACKSON. 
Sheffield. 



CHRISTMAS CAROLS. 
(3 rd S. iii. 6, 59.) 

The subject which has been opened by your 
correspondent A. A. is very curious, and deserves 
further investigation and illustration. 

Many ancient Christmas carols have already 
been published. I believe the very earliest which 
is known to have been published dates from the 
year 1521. It is now in the Bodleian Library, 
and consists of two carols. One is named " A 
Carrol of huntynge," which is reprinted in Ber- 
ner's Boke of St. Alban's ; the other is styled " A 
Carrol, bringing in the Bore's head." This used 
to be sung, and perhaps is still, in Queen's Col- 
lege, Oxford, to the chant of one of the Psalms. 

The Bibliographical Miscellanies (Oxford, 1813, 
4to) contains seven carols from a collection in 
one volume, belonging to Christ Church College, 
Oxford, " Imprinted at London, in the Powltry, 
by Richard Kele, 'dwelynge at the longe Shop 
under Saynt Myldrede's Church." The date is 
unknown. 

The custom of singing carols seems to have 
een very common on the Continent, as well as 
m England, Ireland, and Scotland. 

send you a scrap of an ancient German carol : 
" Kin Kindlein so lobelich, 
1st uns gebohren heute, 
Von einer Jungfrau reiniglich 
ZM Trost uns armen Leuten : 

uns das Kindlein nicht gebohrn, 
*x> waren wir allzuniahl verlohrn, 



Das Heil ist unser aller. 
Ey du siisser Jesu Christ, 
Weil filr uns Mensch worden bist, 
Behiit uns fur die Holle." 

See Christliches Gesangbuch, p. 36. 

Bo wring, in his Ancient Poetry and Romances o 
Spain (ed. London, 1824), gives a few Spanis 
carols, beginning with the words " Llevadmt 
Nino, a Belen." 

" Carry me, Babe ! to Bethlem now, 

For I would look on Thee, my God ! 
Thou art alone my goal and Thou, 
Thou to that goal the only road." 

Another curious one is given at p. 178. ] 
begins thus : " Pues en esta feliz noche." 

" In such a marvellous night, so fair, 

And full of wonders strange and new ; 
Ye shepherds of the vale declare 
Who saw the greatest wonder? Who? 

" First. ' I saw the trembling fire look wan.' 

Second. * I saw the sun shed tears of blood.' 

Third. ' I saw a God become a Man.' 

Fourth. ' I saw a man become a God.' 

' wond'rous marvels ! at the thought, 

The bosom's awe and reverence move ; 
But who such prodigies hath wrought? 
What gave such wonders birth ? 'Twas Love. 

" Yes ! love hath wrought, and love alone, 

The victories all beneath above ; 
And earth and heaven shall shout, as one, 
The all-triumphant song of love." 

There are several collections of old carols it 
French, which are published in a scarce wori| 
entitled, Noels Nouveaux sur les Chants dei\ 
Noels Anciens, notez pour en faciliter le Chant] 
par M. 1'Abbe Pellegrin. (Paris, 1785, 8vo.) 

Have any of your readers a copy of the fol- 
lowing odd title of a Christmas Carol ? 

" A Christmas Carol on Peko-Tea ; or, a Sacred Carol.i 
which, like Tea that is perfectly good and fine, will be 
most grateful and useful all the year round, from Christ- 
mas to Christmas for ever. Humbly addressed to Queen) 
Caroline, and the Princess Carolina, and all the Royal 
Family." By Francis Hoffman, London, 1722, 8vo. 

The two verses quoted by F. C. H. beginning :l 

" As I sot on'a Sonday bonk," &c. 

form the commencement of a carol which isl 

still printed in London, or at least used to be 

some years ago ; for I have an alphabetical list! 

of Christmas carols, which have been published,) 

i to be sung by old and young in the streets.! 

Amongst these come the lines referred to above. I 

I have only seen the first verse of a carol, which; 

used to be sung in Warwickshire, which thusi 

begins : 

" As I passed by a river side, 

And there as I did rein (run), 
In argument I chanced to hear 
A Carnal and a Crane." 

But I conclude, lest I should occupy too much 
of your space. J. DALTON. 



s. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



95 



DERIVATION OF HACKNEY." 
(3 rd S. ii. 335, 378.) 

Some time ago I took great pains to endeavour 
to find the origin of this word. The earliest use 
of it (unless the Tournament of Tottenham be 
older, which is very improbable), I believe to be 
in Chaucer's Romaunt of the Rose. Riches is 
there described as accompanied by a young man, 
who, among other luxuries, 

loved well to have hors of prise ; 

He wend to have reproved be 
Of theft or murder, if that he 
Had in his stable an hacknay," &c. 

In Miege's Dictionary, the English word " hack- 
ney " is interpreted " cheval de louage," the 
French " haquenee," an ambling horse ; and " pas 
d'haquenee," an ambling pace. The glossary to 
the black letter Chaucer (1687), on the contrary, 
says "hackeney," a trotting horse. Of course I 
referred immediately to the passage in the original 
Roman de la Rose (1125, &c.), from which Chau- 
has translated almost line for line : 
" Si avoit des chevaulx de pris, 
Bien eust cuide estre repris 
De meurtre ou de larrecin 
S'en son estable n'eust roucin" 

glossary to this last-named work simply 
gives " roucin, cheval," but that appended to the 
excellent Pantheon Rabelais, says "Roussin, roucin, 
cheval de service, k 1'usage des domestiques ; et, 
par consequent, fort inferieur au coursier ou 
dextrier." It is clear Guillaume de Lorris and 
Jean de Meun, and also Chaucer and Miege, mean 
an inferior sort of horse ; but there is nothing in 
these authors to intimate a hireling. 

The town of Hackney has always been asso- 
ciated with hired horses by two opposite tradi- 
tions. One, that it was so named because many 
Londoners visited it on "hackney" or hired 
horses; the other, that such horses were so named 
after the town for the like reason. If the latter 
be correct, the French must have borrowed their 
term "haquenee" from us. They have done so 
since with the words "trot," "jockey," "sport," 
and several more ; but it may be questioned whe- 
! ther they did so at such an early period. If the 
! former be true, the place must have given its 
| name to the horses at least as early as Chaucer's 
I time. Our Anglo-Saxon forefathers were accus- 
tomed to name their towns from their natural 
local peculiarities. The knoll rising from the 
vale, the marshy pool, the wood jutting out of the 
sandy ground, the landing-place, any such cir- 
cumstances have given names to thousands of 

localities, which retain them to this day as 

Holmsdale, Merton, Sandhurst, Greenhithe, and a 
host of others testify. I believe all must agree 
that Hackney has certainly a strong Anglo-Saxon 



sound with it. The present visitor would be 
wholly at a loss to find anything there which 
existed in olden times, unless he went to the ham- 
let of Homerton, which still stands on the holme 
or rising ground overlooking the vale of the Lea, 
which, before the Bromley Lock was made, was a 
"mere" or pool at every tide, and therefore might 
very properly still be called Holm-mere-town, or 
the town on the rising ground close to the mere. 
Scarce a hundred years ago the case was very 
different as to Hackney proper, or Old Hackney as 
it is now called. The Londoner started then from 
Shoreditch church, and went to Hackney across 
pleasant open fields, a walk of little more than a 
mile and a half. It was then a village, across the 
main street of which a bright clear brook flowed. 
It was, in fact, the confluence of two streams, 
one coming at the west from Dalston, and the 
other northward from Stamford Hill and Horn- 
sey. In flood times it was scarcely fordable ; and, 
though now its contents are discharged through 
the new gigantic sewer, and are lost to sight, it 
was then a conspicuous object. A curious rhym- 
ing MS. account of the visit of some ringers to try 
Hackney bells, now in Guildhall, says it was 
famous for 

" Eoach and gudgeon, dace, and eels." 
And it must have been a pleasant sight to " one 
long in populous cities pent." Now if this divided 
brook gave the name to the place, it might have 
suggested to the Anglo-Saxon the appellation of 
" Haccan-ey," or the " cut " or " separated " run- 
ning water. It would have been the first con- 
spicuous object which met his view. Of course 
any such vague conjecture as this is too weak a 
matter for any theory to depend on ; but some- 
times these suggestions do the service of straws 
thrown up, " to show which way the wind blows." 
I should be very glad to know from your 
readers whether there is any mention of the word 
" hackney," meaning an inferior horse, earlier than 
the one I have quoted from Chaucer ? How early 
can the French word " haquenee " be traced, and 
what is supposed to be its derivation? How 
early can the term " hackney " be found clearly 
associated with a hired horse or vehicle ? Is there 
any cognate word in French signifying hiring ? 
And, particularly, is there any mention of Hack- 
ney as a place anterior to the time of the Knights 
Templars who had the manor ? A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 



BOSCOBEL OAK. 
(3 rd S. iii. 46.) 

In Shaw's Staffordshire : General History (vol. i. 
. 74), a long extract is given from The Book of 
Joscobel ; and at p. 80, we have : 



96 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



III. JAN. 31, '63. 



" Boscobel was so called from its beautiful situation on 
a moderate elevation, and the agreeable woods * that lay 
all around the house, which are now entirely destroyed 
as well as the Royal Oak, which stood in the midst of 
them; and was so thickened by ivy that the soldiers, 
who were in search of the King, and believed him to be 
in the wood, could not espy him. This tree was divided 
into more parts by the Koyalists than perhaps any oak 
of the same size ever was, each man thinking himself 
happy if he could produce a tobacco-stopper, box, &c., 
made of this wood though all that were showed as 
sacred were not genuine. The place where this famous 
tree once flourished is yet to be discovered by a square 
wall built about it, where is another tree from one of 
its acorns ; and over the door on a large stone is a Latin 
inscription," from which it appears that the wall was 
built by Basil and Jane Fitzherbert. 

As the Book of Boscobel was printed in 1660, 
the Royal Oak had then perished. 

The oak stood in Shropshire, but near the 
boundary of Staffordshire (Shaw, p. 73). And in 
the map to Plot's Staffordshire, opposite to Chil- 
lington (which may be found by the Index to 
places in the map), the situation of the oak is 
marked ; and also that of Boscobel House, of 
which Shaw (p. 79) gives a picture taken in 1796. 

On Saturday, January 17, 1863, I inspected the 
tree in Hyde Park. From 200 to 300 yards west 
of the receiving house, and close to the footpath 
running on the north side of the carriage drive, 
there is an oblong mound some dozen yards long, 
and two feet higher than the common ground, 
and this is surrounded by iron fleaks or hurdles. 
The tree stands at the western end of this in- 
closure : its bole appears about eighteen inches in 
diameter, and about six feet high to the first 
branch; its bark is gone, and it exhibits plain 
symptoms of decay close to the ground, but it 
does not appear to be hollow. A luxuriant plant 
of ivy covers the upper part of the tree, and sur- 
mounts its summit. It may be about twenty feet 
from the ground to the top of the ivy. Two or 
three bare limbs project out of the ivy. The tree 
has never been a large one, and probably never 
was a^ nourishing one. It is impossible to say how 
long it lived, as the growth of an oak varies so 
much in different soils; and even in the same 
wood I have known many trees of a hundred 
years growth larger, and many less than this oak. 
The tree appears to have been long dead : it was 
so when I first remember it, as well as its com- 
panion, which was no larger than it is. 

The stem of the ivy may be from eight to ten 
inches in circumference ; and, therefore, it must 
be of considerable age and this suggests the 
question, whether it was not planted in order 
that the oak might be covered with ivy like its 
parent ? 



* Boscobel is " the beautiful wood," from boscus, the 
old law-Latin word for wood ; Old Fr. bos; and bele, Old 
Fr., beautiful. (Kelham's Diet.} 



In a letter in The Times, a few days ago, it wa 
stated that there is an oak from an acorn of th< 
Royal Oak, still existing at^ Boscobel, and thi 
may well be the case. There is an old saying, tba 
the oak is a hundred years in coming to maturity, 
hundred years at maturity, and a hundred year 
in going to decay. Having all my life been a: 
enthusiastic admirer of the oak, I have paid con 
siderable attention to the age to which it lives 
and my conviction is, that an oak rarely attain 
its full size in a hundred years, and that thre 
hundred years are by no means the limit of it 
existence. C. S. GREAVES. 

Whether the two old oaks, now one, standing a 
described by your correspondent D. P. in 3 rd S 
iii. 46, were grown from Boscobel acorns, I kno\ 
not ; but the tradition really and truly connecte 
with them, is, the fatal duel fought by the fift 
Lord Mohun and the Duke of Hamilton. I 
Nov. 1712, Lord Mohun fell by the hand of th 
Duke, while the latter was killed through tb 
treachery of Lord Mohun's second, General Ma 
cartney ; who was tried for the offence June 11 
1716, in the Court of King's Bench, and acquitte 
of the murder, but convicted of manslaughte: 
It may have been then, that in those days of tb 
" King over the Water," that the oaks were know 
as the children of Richard Penderell's monarch < 
the forest ; but as a local antiquary, I only ke 
of the spot where they grew, in connection with tt 
extinct peerage of Mohun of Boconnock, or rath* 
of Oakhampton, for so the patent ran ; how fe\ 
alas ! of the race of the stout Sir Wm. de Mohni 
who fought with forty-seven good knights i 
Hastings, are left : 

" The knights are dust, and their good swords rust? 
Their souls are with the saints we trust." 

0. 



A correspondent, D. P. in " N. & Q." (3 rd S.ii 
46), inquired if a tree, supposed to have bee 
planted by Charles II. from an acorn of the me 
morable oak in which he was concealed at Bosc< 
bel, is still standing in Hyde Park. Leavin 
others to answer this query, I send some par 
ticulars of the present state of the Boscobel Oal; 
which cannot fail to be interesting. They ha^i 
been obtained from a correspondent residing nei, 
Boscobel. 

Of course it is well known that the exist'm 
oak at Boscobel is not the identical tree in whic| 
the fugitive monarch was concealed. That trej 
was destroyed soon after the Restoration by tt| 
zeal of the royalists, who carried it off piecemeii 
for relics, as in later times visitors to the field ( ! 
Waterloo did Wellington's tree. The present oai 
sprang from an acorn of the old tree planted oj 
the exact spot where the actual Royal Oak stooc 



$r& s. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUEKIES. 



97 



It was raised soon after the demolition of th 
previous tree, and may be already two centuries 
old. Indeed, it already exhibits signs of decay- 
It was enclosed within a square brick wall by Sir 
Basil Fitzherbert, which was replaced by a cir- 
cular iron railing in the year 1814, which still, re- 
mains for the protection of the tree. It is not a 
tree of noble dimensions, and is not likely to grow 
any larger ; for, as already observed, it appears 
now to be hastening to decay. Some of its 
branches are dead, and some have dropped off. 
Three patches of lead indicate the care taken for 
the preservation of the venerable tree ; but at 
the same time tell a sad tale of its decay. I made 
a copy, more than fifty years ago, of a drawin 
taken on the spot at the time, and when the brie 
wall surrounded the tree ; but half a century has 
done its work since upon us both. F. C. H. 



OME AND FOREIGN REVIEW " (3 rd S. iii. 80.) 
The following occurs in a short notice of the 
Home and Foreign Review, No. III. : " This Re- 
view is, we believe, the recognised organ of the 
Roman Catholic Church in this country." This 
is an unfortunate mistake; and appearing in a 
paper of so high a character and so extensive a 
circulation as those of " N. & Q..," is calculated to 
create a very wrong impression. May I beg, 
therefore, to inform you and your many readers, 
that this Review has been censured by the Car- 
dinal Archbishop and all the Catholic Bishops in 
England, who have all issued warnings to their 
flocks against its perusal. So far from its being 
the organ of the Catholic Church, it is denounced 
by the Cardinal as " grazing ever the very edges 
of the most perilous abysses of error," and for 
" its habitual preferences of uncatholic to catholic 
instincts, tendencies, and motives." Bishop Ulla- 
thorne has condemned it in much stronger terms, 
and charged his clergy to guard the faithful, " lest 
by reading those productions, they imbibe their 
uncatholic sentiments and their errors." 

F. C. HUSENBETH, D.D. 

SIR ADRIAN FORTESCUE (3 rd S. iii. 69.) MR. 
ESTCOURT, in expressing a doubt of Sir Adrian 
Fortescue having belonged to the order of St. 
John of Jerusalem, was both right and wrong. 
He did belong to that order, inasmuch as he was 
a Knight of Devotion, that is, was allowed to wear 
the cross of the Order out of devotion, and share 
all the spiritual privileges accorded to every 
member of it. But he was not a Knight of Jus- 
tice in gremio religions (he being a married man), 
and the Knights of Justice are alone considered 
as strictly belonging to the Order according to 
the Rule. It has always been, and still is, a 
custom in the Religion of St. John, to confer the 
Cross of Devotion, as a mark of favour, on in- 



dividuals who have deserved well of the Order. 
There are in the records at Malta two Bulls, of 
the Grand Master d'Amboise, I think, granting 
the privilege of wearing the Cross of Devotion 
to Thomas Stanley, third Earl of Derby ; to his 
Countess (a Hastings ?), and to his eldest son ; and 
also to Charles Somerset, first Earl of Worcester, 
and to his Countess also (a Dudley, if I re- 
member). There are others to less distinguished 
persons. 

There are, in Malta, two pictures of Sir Adrian 
Fortescue ; one in the church of St. John, where 
he is (improperly) represented in the sopravest 
of the Order, and holding the palm of martyrdom. 
The other is in the Capitular Convent of St. 
Paolo at Rabato, in which he is painted, with the 
axe, the instrument of his martyrdom, struck 
deep into the back of his neck. If it would be 
any satisfaction to KAPPA, I could show him a 
copy of the first of these portraits, on my return 
to town, probably in the beginning of April. 

JOHN JAMES WATTS. 
Stafford Club, 2, Savile Row. 

DEACON BRODIE AND THE DROP (3 rd S. iii. 47.) 
Some interesting particulars as to Deacon Brodie 
will be found in The Leisure Hour, No. 204, p. 745 
et seq. (November 22, 1855.) 

Your correspondent is mistaken on two points. 
Brodie suffered for robbing the Excise Office, not 
the Bank ; and though there is a popular tradi- 
tion that he invented the drop, and was the first 
victim on it, I have heard it stated by old people 
who lived at the time that neither of these was 
the fact. G. 

Edinburgh. 

PETRUS LUDOVICUS MILL (3 rd S. iii. 48.) The 
Rev. P. L. Mill was a French priest, one of the 
many who took refuge in England at the French 
Revolution. His name was Moulin, but he Angli- 
cised it to Mill. He succeeded to the charge of 
the small Catholic congregation of Brigg, in Lin- 
colnshire, on the death of the previous missioner, 
who was also a French exiled priest, the Rev. 
John Toussaint Froment, formerly of Dieppe, in 
;he diocese of Rouen ; who died on the 24th of 
May, 18*10, after serving the Mission of Brigg 
ixteen years. Mr. Mill, as recorded on his grave- 
tone at Brigg, died May 9, 1822, at the advanced 
ige of eighty-eight years. F. C. H. 

KELD (3 rd S. iii. 26.) In one part of the North 
Riding of Yorkshire, held and well are very differ- 
:nt. On the northern border of the vale of Pick- 
Ting, several of the becks (brooks) suddenly sink 
nto the earth, and after a shorter or longer dis- 
ance half a mile to a mile, or more rise to the 
urface. One rises at Pickering, and is called 
teldhead ; another rises near the hamlet of Keld- 
olm, seven miles west of Pickering ; and a third, 
wo miles further in the same direction, is known 



98 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd g. III. JAX. 31, '63. 



as Nowkeldhead. Two of these turn mills soon 
after they emerge. But wells are artificial exca- 
vations, supplied with water by percolation through 
the earth. J. D. 

THE ALE-YARD (3 rd S. iii. 46.) Under the 
name of "The Long Glass," the "Ale- Yard" is 
still, at least was very lately if not now, in use 
among the boys at Eton. Those who attain to a 
certain standing, either as a " Wet Bob," i. e. in 
the boats, or as a " Dry Bob," i. e. at cricket, are 
invited to attend "Cellar," which is held at 
"Tap," about once a- week during the summer 
school-time ; and consists in a social talk over a 
pint of good beer, and bread and cheese ad lib. ; 
but on attending for the first time, the novice is 
placed in a chair with a napkin tied round him, 
and has to "floor" the "Long Glass" in the 
manner described by M. D., before he obtains a 
right to come to " Cellar " whenever he pleases. 
Some never manage to "floor" it; but twenty 
seconds used in my time, five years ago, to be 
considered quick time ; I, if I remember right, 
took thirty-five seconds, which was the average. 

ETONENSIS. 

LOWNDES'S " BRITISH LIBRARIAN " (3 rd S. iii. 
47.) In my copy of this useful but unfinished 
account of books on " Religion and its History," 
there is bound up, following p. 1191, a MS. note 
dated January 4, 1843, in which "Messrs. Whit- 
taker & Co. regret to inform Mr. Baker that, 
owing to a temporary (as they hope) illness of 
Mr. Lowndes, his work is necessarily suspended ; 
every endeavour will be made to complete it, tho' 
considerable time must unavoidably elapse." 

It is probable that the author never recovered 
sufficiently to enable him to resume his labours 
and complete it. GILBERT J. FRENCH. 

The publication of this work was commenced 
by Whittaker & Co., in 1839. It was to be issued 
in parts at 2s. 6d. each. Class I. " Religion and 
its History," was at first intended to be completed 
in three parts; but it seems to have grown on 
the compiler's hands, and was unfinished when 
the eleventh part was issued, and the work dis- 



continued, 
Bic 



leaving the articles on "Missions," 
" &c., untouched. Parts 1 to 5 were 



published in 1839 ; 6 to 8 in 1840. Part 9 was 
issued with a note " that its publication had been 
delayed owing to the illness of the editor and a 
serious ophthalmic attack : " and Part 11 did not 
appear till 1842. Shortly afterwards, according 
to a notice in the Gent. Mag. (N. S. vol. xx. 
p. 326), Mr. Lowndes's mental faculties gave 
way, and he died after an illness of nine months 
on July 31st, 1843. The arrangement of the 
work is not alphabetical; but the books are 
minutely classified according to subject. I offer 
these remarks in correction of EIRIONNACH'S in- 
formation that the cause of its discontinuance 



was the " failure of the publisher," and that it 
" did not get beyond the letter B or C." 

JOB J. BARD WELL WORKARD, M.A. 

ITINERARIES OF EDWARD I. AND II., ETC. 
(3 rd S. i. 466 ; iii. 36.) I am indebted to DR. 
PETTIGREW for his reply to part of my inquiries, 
in June last, respecting royal itineraries. la 
the interim, however, I had seen the Rev. 
C. H. Hartshorne's very complete Itinerary of 
Edward II. in the Collectanea Archceologica ; and 
that gentleman had, most courteously, searched 
through his MS. Itinerary of Edward I. for the 
information which I required. Of the itinerary 
of Henry III. I have not yet obtained any in- 
formation. It may be worth recording in the 
pages of " N. & Q.," for the benefit of other in- 
quirers on this subject, that, although not sup- 
plying a complete itinerary of the king, many 
particulars of his progresses will be found in the 
"Extracts from the Privy Purse Expenses of 
King Henry the Seventh, from Dec. A 7, 1491, 
to March, A 20, 1505," printed in the Excerpta 
Historica, pp. 85133. WILLIAM KELLY. 

Leicester. 

SPIRITUAL SONGS (3 rd S. iii. 44.) The song 
commencing 

" The Paip, that Pagan full of pride," 
will be recollected by many as placed in the 
mouth of Adam Woodcock in Sir Walter Scott's 
novel, The Abbot (ch. xv.) 

There is an interesting manuscript in the Bri- 
tish Museum (Addit. MS. 15,225), containing 
several poems, some of no little merit, most of 
them adapted to the measure of a profane tune, 
such as "Johnnie, come kiss me now." The 
volume is lettered (I do not know on what autho- 
rity) as belonging to the Elizabethan period ; and 
it would seem to be the production of a Roman 
Catholic author or transcriber. I do not know 
that it has ever been edited, or whether its con- 
tents may be found elsewhere ; and I should be 
glad to be informed on these points. 

The adapting of a sacred hymn to a secular 
tune is a favourite practice with some hymn- 
writers. There is a saying, attributed to the late 
Rev. Rowland Hill, " that he did not see why the 
devil should have all the best tunes." Charles 
Wesley is said to have attracted some drunken 
colliers whom he met singing in the streets to his 
chapel, by writing the following hymn to their 
own tune : 

" Listed into the cause of sin, 

Why should a good be evil ? 
Music, alas ! too long has been 

Pressed to obey the devil. 
Drunken, or lewd, or light, the lay 

Flows to the soul's undoing, 
Widens and strews with flowers the way 
Down to eternal ruin," &c. 



3'd S. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



99 



I know of several " hymns for children " set to 
the tunes of" Poor Mary Ann " (" Ar hyd y nos "), 
" Minnie," &c. But the most audacious appro- 
priator of profane song tunes I have met with, is, 
a man named Richard Weaver, who appeared in 
London a year or two ago as a " converted col- 
lier" and "revivalist." He published a Hymn- 
book containing some rare specimens of irreverent 
language, and his habit was to vociferate one of 
these " hymns " from time to time in the intervals 
of his addresses, to the tune of " The King of the 
Cannibal Islands," " Polly Hopkins," or some other 
of the same class. 

JOB J. BARDWELL WORKARD, M.A. 

QUOTATION (3 rd S. iii. 8.) 

" Deap in the wave is a coral grove, 
Where the purple mullet and goldfish rove, 
Where the seaflower spreads its leaves of blue, 
That never are wet with falling dew ; 
But in bright and changeful Jbeauty shine, 
Far down in the green and glassy brine. 

(The floor is of sand like the mountain drift, 
And the pearl shells spangle," &c. 
From The Coral Grove. By J. G. Percival. 
E.M. 
ALE OF VENSION (3 rd S. iii. 46.) A prior ex- 
tract to that of S. O. V.: 

" But deer are daily diminished in England, since the 
gentry are necessitated into thrift, and forced to turn 

their pleasure into profit I believe in process 

of time, the best stored park will be found in a cook's shop 
in London." Fuller's Worthies, vol. ii. p. 217. 

The extract from Prior's Life of Malone softens 
the fact of the nobleman's necessity /.though that 
necessity was caused by civil war, and no doubt 
was the origin of the sale of venison. R. J. F. 

STANYSBT (3 rd S. iii. 48.) Perhaps the Go- 
vernor of the Isle of Man, who has lately taken 
the name of Stainsby-Conant, may be interested 
in this grant. R. J. F. 

THE GEORGES CLUB (3 rd S. ii. 505.) In 
Percy's Eeliques (vol. iii. p. 373, edition 1812), J. 
G. 1ST. will find " St. George for England," a ballad 
written by annual stanzas by John Grubb, as the 
price of his admission to a Club of Georges, which 
existed at Oxford. The rule of limitation being 
relaxed in favour of the bearer of the Christian 
name John only upon this condition. Having long 
remained in MS., the lines were only printed at 
last upon an Expostulatiuncula being presented to 
his friend Anthony Atherton. It begins thus 
Toni ! tune sines divina poemata Grubbi 

Intomb'd in secret thus still to remain any longer? " &c. 

Y. B. N. J. 

INCISED INSCRIPTIONS FILLED WITH LEAD (3 rd 
S. iii. 47.) The Note of your correspondent 
J. SAN has recalled to my recollection a circum- 
stance which may throw some light on the anti- 
quity of the practice which J. SAN has not before 



seen or heard of. Many of the towers on the 
j outer wall of Constantinople have inscriptions re- 
! cording their erection. In some cases these are 
j cut in white marble, and extend the whole breadth 
! of the tower. Examining the ruins of one of the 
j fallen towers, I found a piece of the incised in- 
| scription which had adorned it when entire, and 
was much surprised to find portions of the incised 
letters still filled up with lead. Holes about an inch 
in depth, and a little wider than the diameter of an 
ordinary goose-quill, had been bored into the mar- 
ble at the top and bottom of the letters, and where 
the upright stroke was long, in the middle as well ; 
and several of these holes were still filled with 
the plugs of lead, having part of the metal that 
filled up the letters attached. The rest had likely 
gone for bullets to amateur sportsmen. The use 
of thus filling up the inscription I cannot conjec- 
ture, unless the letters were gilt. In none of 
those that remain entire are the incised letters 
filled up, so far as I could see. I may mention 
also, that several of the towers have inscriptions 
formed of bricks standing out from the wall in 
relief, the edges of the thin bricks being built so 
as to form the letters. Have these inscriptions 
been ever copied? Is the filling up of incised 
letters with lead an unusual mode ? If I am not 
mistaken, I have seen it on Greek tombstones as 
well as on the towers of the Lower Empire. 

J.A. 

MINUCIUS FELIX (3 rd S. ii. 445.) "Ephesia 
mammis multis et veribus exstructa." The change 
from uberibus to et turribus, suggested by MR. 
TREGELLES, is plausible on the ground of errors 
in transcription ; but it don't appear to have the 
sanction of any of the editors or commentators of 
Minucius Felix. 

I beg to refer MR. TREGELLES to that valuable 
edition of 

" M. Minucii Felicis Octavius cum integris omnium 
Notis ac Commentariis novaque Kecensione Jacobi Ouzeli, 
&c. &c. Lugduni Batavorum, ex Officina Hackiana, 
1672 ;" 

in which there are some able notes on the line in 
question by Wowerus, Elmenhorstius, Heraldus, 
and Rigaltius. They are too extensive to be in- 
serted here ; but I may as well say, pro bono 
publico, their comments on the various readings of 
uberibus, &c., is confined to veribus, verubus, and 
tuberibus. 

Rigaltius concludes his comment as follows : 

" At convenientissime dicetur exstructa uberibus, tali's 
enim cernitur in numis antiquis, ubi sunt exstructa seu 
disposita ubera et mammae tanquam cajmenta et lapides 
in modum columns, Diana sive Cerere mammis, et pec- 
tore tenus, superimposita." 

GEORGE LLOYD. 

Music AND ARCHITECTURE (3 rd S. iii. 48.) 
Your correspondent will find a comparison drawn 



100 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[8** S. III. JAN. 31, '63. 



between musical discord and architectural, in 
p. 21 et seq., of Mr. Garbett's Principles of De- 
sign in Architecture, which forms No. 18 of Mr. 
Weale's Rudimentary Series. 

W. DE GULDEFOBDE. 

STAMINA (3 rd S. iii. 27.) The singular of this 
word, " stamen," is most probably derived from 
the Greek, ari]\uav, applied to the upright threads 
or warp of the loom ; thence to any threads, those 
of the lyre for instance ; and thence by meto- 
nymy to the thread of man's life, as spun by the 
ParcaB from their distaff. Tibullus begins his ce- 
lebrated Seventh Elegy of the First Book, 

" Hunc cecinere diem Parcse fatalia nentes 
Stamina," &c. 

Juvenal, in his Twelfth Satire, 65, uses the 
same phrase as regards the Fatal Sisters, but in 
the singular, " et staminis albi lanificse." The 
meaning, no doubt, is, that he who has most sta- 
mina, id est, most threads as yet uncut by Atropos 
upon the distaff of his fate, will be the longest 
liver and strongest man. A. A. 

Poets' Corner. 

ORIGIN OF CROCKETS (3 rd S. iii. 25.) The 
flower supposed to be imitated in crocketed work 
would probably h.ave been Cypripedium calceolus, 
an indigenous English plant, now very rare, rather 
than the Calceolaria, which is a South American 
genus, of comparatively modern introduction. The 
English native Slipperwort has three petals sur- 
mounting the slipper, giving it more of the ap- 
pearance alluded to. These are wanting in the 
allied genus Calceolaria. A. A. will know the 
writer by his signature. XANADU. 

CAVE HOUSE SCHOOL (3 rd S. iii. 6.) I doubt 
whether the " Debate " referred to by MR. INGLIS 
was written by the Master of Cave House School, 
wherever that may be. I think I can trace its 
use in a London school, as a " Recitation," further 
back than the year 1841. 

JOB J. BARDWELL WORKARD, M.A. 



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CuRiostrs. 

" One touch of nature makes the whole world kin." 

.Troilus and Cressida, Act III. S. 3. 
" Think nought a trifle, though it small appear; 
Smalt sands make mountains, moments make the year, 
And trifle* life." Young's 6th Satire. 

PLAY COLLECTOR . The marriage inquired after, withMiis Lccson , took 
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to Prince Rupert and the Cavaliers, the MS. of "Prince Kuperf* 

Diary " was purchased by Mr. JBentley. On the early Manufacturer* 

of Paper and thetrWater-markt. coruult s< ?;>.- of articles in " N. & Q." 
vols. ii. iii. v. and ix. of the 1st Series ; Herring's Paper and Paper- 
Makin?, Ancient and Modern, edit. 1856; but especially S. L. Sotheby's 
Principia Typographica, vol. iii. on "Paper-Marks," fol. 1858. 

J. H. SHORTHODSE. The imperfect work is entitled England's 
Tribunal, first published in 1659, again in 1660. Our Corrcspo 
copy agrees in every respect with the edition of 1680, with the e.x<-i'/iti<//i ( 
the first article" A True Pourtraiture of Charles If.," which is omitte 
in the copy before us. After Dr. Hewyt's Prayer is a Letter by him to 
Dr. Wilde, which ends onp. 180, and concludes the work. 

HENRY T. BOBART. The paper on the Great Frost of 1683, by Jacob 
Sobart, appeared in the Philosophical Transactions, vol. xiv. pp. 
766-789; and in the Abridgment, vol. iii. p. 89. 

CABILFORD (Cape Town.) J. Ozanam's Cursus Mathematicus, or, a 
Compleat Course of the Mathematics, makes five vols., and was first 
" done into English " in 1712. 

ERRATt7M._3rd S. iii. p. 77, col. ii. line 9, for "1770" read" 1700." 
"Noras AND QUERIES" is published at noon on Friday, and is 
itsued in MONTHLY PARTS. The Subscription for STAMPED COPIES for 
Six Months forwarded direct from the Publishers (including the Half- 
yearly INDEX) is 11. 4d., which may be paid by Post Office Order in 
favour O/MESSRS. BBLL AND DALDY, 186, FLBBT STREET, B.C.; to whom 
all COMMUNICATIONS FOR TH EDITOR should be addressed. 



IMPORTING TEA without colour on the leaf 

prevents the Chinese passing off inferior leaves as in the usual kinds. 
Ilorniman's Tea is uncoloured, therefore, always good alike. Sold in 
packets by 2,280 Agents. 



JC. and J. FIELD, Original Manufacturers (in 
i England) of PARAFFINE CANDLES, to whom the prize 
medal (1862) has been awarded, and their Candles adopted by her 
Majesty's Government for use at the Military Stations abroad. These 
Candles can be obtained of all Chandlers and Grocers in the United 
Kingdom. Price Is. Sd. per Ib. Also Field's celebrated United Service 
Soap Tablets, Gd. and 4d. each. The Public are cautioned to see that 
Field's label is on the packets or boxes. Wholesale only, and for 
Exportation, Upper Marsh, Lambeth, London, S. 

THE PRETTIEST GIFT for a LADY is one of 
JONES'S GOLD LEVERS, at 11 Z. 11s. For a GENTLEMAN, 
one at 10Z. io. Rewarded at the International Exhibition for " Cheap- 
ness of Production." 

Manufactory, 338, Strand, opposite Somerset House. 



;r<i S. III. JAN. 31, '63.] 



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ESTABLISHED 1842. 

C7ESTERN, MANCHESTER AND LONDON, 

V AND METROPOLITAN COUNTIES LITE ASSURANCE 
W ANNUITY SOCIETY. 

CHIEF OFFICES : 3. PARLIAMENT STREET. LONDON, and 
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Directors. 

The Hon. R. E. Howard, D.C.L. 

James Hunt, Esq. 

John Leigh, Esq. 

Edm. Lucas, Esq. 

F. B. Marson, Esq. 

E. Vansittart Neale, Esq., M.A. 

Bonamy Price, Esq., M.A. 

Jas. Lys Seager, Esq. 

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John B. "White, Esq. 



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[\ Somers Cock?, Esq., M.A., J.P. 

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Fohn Fisher, Esq. 

W. Freeman, Esq. 

Charles Frere, Esq. 

Henry P. Fuller, Esq. 

r. H. Ooodhart, Esq., J.P. 

1. T. Hibbert, Esq.,M.A., M.P. 

Peter Hood, Esq, 



Henry Wilbraham, Esq., M.A. 
Actuary. Arthur Scratchley, M.A. 

Attention is particularly invited to the VALUABLE NEW PRIN- 

3"LE by which Policies effected in this Office do NOT become VOID 

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mission is given upon application to suspend the payment at in- 

rest, according to the conditions stated in the Society's Prospectus. 

The attention of the Public is confidently invited to the several 

ibles and peculiar Advantages offered to the Assurers, which will be 

und fully detailed in the Prospectus. 

It will be observed, that the Rates of Premium are so low as to 

ford at once an IMMEDIATE BONUS to the Assured, when compared 

ith the Rates of most other Companies. 

The next Division of Bonus will be made in 1864. Persons entering 

ithin tne present year will secure an additional proportion. 

MKDICAL MEN are remunerated, in all cases, for their Reports to the 

No CHARGE MADE FOB POLICV STAMPS. 

The Rates of ENDOWMENTS granted to young lives, and of ANNUITIES 

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Now ready, price 14s. 

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n SAVINGS BANKS, containing a Review of their Past History and 
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mch Legal, Statistical, and Financial Information, for the use of 
trustees, Managers, and Actuaries. 

London: LONGMAN, GREEN, LONGMAN & ROBERTS. 

WINES OF FRANCE, SPAIN, ETC. 

[TEDGES & BUTLER solicit attention to their 

ST. TUS.IEST CX. .A. RET, 

-t 20s., 24s., 30s., and 36s. per dozen; La Rose, 42s.; Latour, 54s.; Mar- 

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rlacon, 30s., 36s.; choice Burgundy, 48s., 60s., 72s., 84s.; pure Chablis, 

Os., 36s., 48s.; Sauterne, 48s., 72s.; Roussillon,36s. ; ditto, old ia bottle, 
i2*.; sparkling Champagne, 42s., 48s., 60s., 66s., 78s. 

SUPERIOR GOLDEN SHERRY, 
of soft and full flavour, highly recommended, at 36s. per dozen. 

Good dinner Sherry 24s. to 30s. 

High class Pale, Golden, or Brown Sherry 42s. 48s. 

Port, from first-class Shippers 36s. 42s. 48s. 60s. 

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.Fine old Sack, rare White Port, Imperial Tokay, Malmsey, Fron- 
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Now ready, 18mo, coloured wrapper, Post Free, 4d. 

N GOUT AND RHEUMATISM. A new 

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London; FRAS. NEWBERY & SONS, 45, St. Paul's Church Yard. 

HOLLOW AY'S PILLS. DESPONDENCY^ Low 
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which is known to debmtate *& 



THE MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY 
(A.D. 1831), 39, King Street, Cheapside, B.C., London. 
Capital on July 1, 1862, from Premiums alone, 421,429. 
Income upwards of .72,000. Assurances, 1,667,380. 
Bonuses average more than 2J per cent, per annum on sum assured. 
Profits divided Yearly, and begin on Second Premium. 
Every Member can attend and vote at all General Meetings. 
Last Annual Report and Accounts may be had. 

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THE LIVERJPO'OL AND LONDON 
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INVESTED FUNDS 1,350,000. 

LONDON- BOAED. 
SIR JOHN MUSGROVE, Bart., Chairman. 

FRED. HARRISON, Esq., and W. SCHOLEFIELD, Esq , M P 
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Macnaughten, Esq 



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John Addis, Esq. 
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Hugh C. E. Childers, Esq., M.P. 
Sir William P. de Bathe, Bart. 
Henry V. East, Esq. 
Edward Huggins, Esq. 
John Laurie, Esq. 

In 1857 the Duty on Fire Insurances in Great Britain paid to Go- 
vernment by this Company was 32,8822., and in 1861 it was 61 ,8337 
being an increase in five years of 29,95 1Z. 

In 1860 the Fire Premiums were 313,725?.: in 1861 they were 360,130?. 
being an increase in one year of 46,405?. The losses paid amount 
to 2,600,000?. and all claims are settled with liberality and promp- 
titude. 

JOHN ATKINS, Resident Secretary. 



A New and Valuable Preparation of Cocoa. 

FRY'S 

ICELAND MOSS COCOA, 
In 1 lb., Jib., and Jib. packets. 

Sold by Grocers and Druggists. 
J. S. FRY & SONS, Bristol and London. 

SAUCE. LEA AND PERKINS' 

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE. 

This delicious condiment, pronounced by Connoisseurs 

"THE ONLY GOOD SAUCE," 

is prepared solely by LEA & PEREINS. 

The Public are respectfully cautioned against worthless imitations, and 
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ASK FOB LEA AND PEEBIWS' SAUCE. 

*** Sold Wholesale and for Export, by the Proprietors, Worcester ; 
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Protection from Fire. 

BRYANT AND MAY'S 
MATCHES. 



MR- HOWARD, SURGEON -DENTIST, 52, 

111 FLEET-STREET, has introduced an ENTIRELY NEW DE- 

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or ligatures. They so perfectly resemble the natural teeth as not to be 
distinguished from the originals by the closest observer ; they will 
never change colour or decay, and will be found superior to any teeth 
ever before used. This method does not require the extraction of roots, 
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loose, and is guaranteed to restore articulation and mastication. De- 
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Dinneford's Pure Fluid Magnesia 

Has been, during twenty-five years, emphatically sanctioned by the 
Medical Profession, and universally accepted by the Public, as the 
Best Remedy for Acidity of the Stomach, Heartburn, Headache, Gout, 
and Indigestion, and as a Mild Aperient for delicate constitutions, more 
especially for Ladies and Children. When combined with the Acidu- 
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in which its Aperient qualities are much increased. During Hot 
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throughout the World. 



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III. JAN. 31, '63. 



STANDARD SCHOOL BOOKS, 
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A NEW LATIN-ENGLISH DICTIONARY- 

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IV. EDITIONS OF THE GREEK TESTAMENT. 
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VI. THE ART LOAN EXHIBITION. 
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1. Cotton Cultivation and Supply. 

2. University Education in Ireland. 

3. The Material Revival of Spain. 

4. Pain's Political Economy. 

5. Scientific Aspects of the Exhibition of 1862. 
<>. Christmas Customs and Superstitions. 

7. Confessions of Frederick the Great. 

8. Venn's Life of St. Francis Xavier. 
5). Contemporary Literature. 

10. Current Events. 



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Dedicated by her Majesty's special permission to her Royal Highness 
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THE ECCLESIASTIC. 

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Some of the Social and Moral Characteristics of the West Riding. 
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[8*4 S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 



" MR. MURRAY'S excellent and uniform Beries of One Volume Histo- 
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MURRAY'S HISTORICAL CLASS BOOKS 
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, possess several " 

rly valuable as edu 

While there is an utter absence of flippancy in them, there is thought 



most of them edited by DR. WM. SMITH, possess several distinctive 
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NOTES AND QUERIES. 



101 



LONDON, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1863. 



CONTENTS. NO. 58. 

NOTES: Oldys's Notes on Hudibras, 101 Quaint and 
Curious Entries in the Parish Register of Dagenham, co. 
Essex, 102 Shakspeare, Sidney, and Essex, Letter II., 
103 Coleridge's Early Poems, published 1796, 106 The 
Rev. James Johnstone, 107 Theosophy, To. 

Miff OR NOTES : Edward Young Harley and Prior 
Graduates of American Colleges Marquess of Lansdowne 

Gaunt's Hospital, Bristol A Lover's Farewell to his 
Mistress : English Latin Reminiscences of Cambridge 
Milton's Works Bibliography of the Civil War in North 
America, 109. 

QUERIES : Anonymous Publications Bebington Family 

Brilliants Story of Bellerus Comenius, " Orbis Pic- 
tus " Blanch Davis Diocesan Libraries in Ireland 
Gentilhomme King, of Yeovil, co. Somerset Christo- 
pher North Nova Scotia Baronets O. P. Squibs 
Horace Vernet Weather Prophecy Weights of Silver 
Coinage Philological Query: Wig A Woman to be Let 
St. Francis Xavier, 111. 

QUERIES WITH AN SWEES : King of Denmark John 
Marckant Nevyll's " Kettus " Stevedore King Ste- 
phen's Breeches Taistril, 113. 

REPLIES: Prediction of St. Vincent, 115 The Com- 
plutensian Polyglot, 116 Christmas Custom at Ack- 
worth, Yorkshire Cecil House and Exeter Change 
Charles Catton, R.A. Junius Somersetshire Wills : 
Horner Samuel Rowe Prseternatural Day recorded in 
the Chinese Chronicles Thomas Clendon Cuckoo-Gun : 
Pembrokeshire Rhyme Wine Callis, 117. 

Notes on Books, &c. 






OLDYS'S NOTES ON HUDIBRAS. 



In our last volume (p. 381) we printed some 
curious Notes by William Oldys on The Life of 
John Milton discovered in a private library. Dur- 
ing the past year the British Museum has been 
presented with another of his annotated books, 
namely, Butler's Hudibras. It will be remem- 
bered that Oldys in his Diary (" N. & Q." 2 Qd S. 
xi. 102) speaks of Mr. Lockrnan having just 
j finished a Life of Butler ; but does not give the 
least hint that he had himself at that time com- 
menced annotating Hudibras, so that it is pre- 
sumed these Notes were written after the inter- 
view noticed in the following entry : 

"July 7, 1737. Thursday. Saw Mr. Lockman. Told 
me he had finished the Life of Mr. Samuel Butler for the 
General Dictionary. That he had had much conversa- 
tion with Mi\ Longueville, who has Butler's History and 
Progress of Learning] a poem by the same hand in 
Hudibrastick verse, and other writings of his in prose 
never printed. That he has also got an original picture 
of Butler, painted by Lilly or Riley. That Butler had 
300Z. for Hudibras ; that he died in Rose Street, Covent 
Garden, and was eighty years of age." 

We copy verbatim the title-page of the edition 
used by our industrious antiquary : 

HUDIBRAS. In Three Parts. Written in the Time of 
the Late Wars. Corrected and Amended, with Additions. 



To which is added Annotations, with an Exact Index to 
the whole. Adorn'd with a new Set of Cuts, Design'd 
and Engrav'd by Mr. Hogarth. London : Printed for B. 
Motte, at the Middle Temple Gate, Fleet Street. 1726. 
12mo. 

On a fly-leaf the donor has written the follow- 
ing note : " This annotated copy of Butler's 
Hudibras (being the first illustrated edition by 
Hogarth), formerly belonged to that famous lite- 
rary antiquary, William Oldys ; and was dis- 
covered in a ' Hag, Bone, and Bottle Warehouse ' 
in Kentish Town, where it was purchased for the 
sum of three-pence on the 16th of June, 1862. 
W. W. W." It is now more than a century since 
this volume was in Oldys's library, so that it is 
remarkable to find it in so perfect a state, not one 
leaf or plate having been abstracted. 

Oldys informs us that " The Author's Life is 
by Sir J. Anstrey." This learned lawyer resided 
at Wood Green, Harlington, in Bedfordshire, and 
published an edition of Spelman's Glossary, with 
his Life. 

The Editor in a note to the first line of the first 
canto, says, "Who made the alterations in the 
last edition of this Poem I know not, but they are 
certainly sometimes for the worse." Oldys has 
added " Tom Durfey." 

PART I. 

Canto I. line 457, Ralph.'] Isaac Robinson, a zealous 
botcher * in Moorfields, who, in the time of the Rebellion 
was always contriving some new querpo-cut in church- 
government. 

Canto I. line 552, Rope.~\ Alderman Hoyle, who hanged 
himself. 

Ib. Walk, Knave, Walk.'] Col. Hewson, \vho had been a 
cobler. 

Canto II. line 71.] In ridicule of Alexander Ross's ar- 
gument for his epitome of Sir Walter Raleigh's History 
of the World. 

Canto II. line 249. The Gallant Bruin"] or Bear Shows, 
the foolish sects in those times, confederates in suppres- 
sing kingly government and episcopacy. 

Canto II. line 409. Cerdon.'] One-eyed Hewson the 
cobler, who from a private centinel in the parliamentary 
army was made a Colonel. 

Canto II. line 442. CoZon.] One Ned Perry, an hostler, 
though a great Puritan and stickler for Oliver, yet would 
lie with any whore but the whore of Babylon. 

Canto III. line 154. Circumcised brethren.'} Prynne, 
Bastwick, and Burton, had their noses slit, and were 
stigmatized in the forehead for lampooning Henrietta 
Maria, Queen of England, and the Bishops. 

Canto III. line 312. Widow.'] The precious relict of 
Aminadab Willmot, an Independent, killed at Edge 
Hill. She had 200/. per annum as a jointure. Hudibras 
fell in love with her, or did worse. 

* Not butcher, as printed in Bohn's edition of Hudi- 
bras. 



102 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 



PART IT. 

Canto I. line 205. A Saxon Duke. ] John Frederi c 
Duke of Saxony, a man of such monstrous corpulency 
that being taken in battle by the Emperor Charles V 
and among other prisoners brought before him, the Em 
peror burst out with this expression, " I have gone ; 
hunting many times, yet never took I such a swine be 
fore." 

Canto II. line 505. George-a- Green. ] There was a Life 
of this George-a-Green, Pinner of Wakefield, published 
in 8vo about 1710, anonymous, but, as I have heard, by 
John Bagford. 

Canto III. line 325. fThachum.] Tom Jones, a foolish 
Welchman, that could neither write nor read, a zany to 
Lilly the astrologer. 

Canto III. line 404. Jw.] This Nicholas Fisk was 
born 1575, bred a physician, and was wont to say, " A 
physician scarce ever deserved his bread till he had no 
teeth to eat it." Yet when he had lost his teeth by his 
age, he could scarce get bread by his profession. He 
was much given to astrological studies, and published 
Sir Christopher Heydon's Discourse on the Influence of 
the Planets, 8vo, 1650, and died about the time of the 
.Restoration, being eighty-five years old. 

PART III. 

Canto I. line 688. Like Philip and Mary on a shilling.'] 
The coins of King Philip and Queen Mary represent their 
heads, not cheek by jowl, but face to face. 

Canto I. line 866. Lewkner's Lane.~\ This place, some 
years ago, swarmed with notoriously lascivious and 
profligate strumpets and Round-heads. 

Canto II. line 220. Sterry.'] A fanatical preacher 
admired by Hugh Peters for his treasonable discourses 
which he held forth. 

In the British Museum (Addit. MS. 4221, 
pp. 198203) are some rough notes by William 
Oldys for a new Life of Samuel Butler, from 
which we extract the following passage on an 
inscription for a proposed monument of the author 
of Hudibras : 

They say that others, on pretence of a better inscrip- 
tion, have resolved to do the like in Covent Garden 
Church for Mr. Butler, where he was buried, as Mr. 
Barber has in Westminster Abbey. The inscription said 
to be intended for him at his burial-place is only in 
English, and said to be written by Mr. Dennis as fol- 
lows : 

Near this place lies interred 
The body of Mr. SAMUEL BUTLER, 

Author of Hudibras. 
He was a whole species of Poets in one, 

Admirable, in a manner 

In which no one else has been tolerable : 

A manner which began and ended in him : 

In which he knew no guide, 

And has found no followers. 

Nat. 1612: Ob. 1680. 



Zoust's portrait of Butler, formerly in the Har- 
leian gallery, was purchased at the sale, March 10, 
1741-2, by Lord Coleraine; but in 1744, when 
engraved for Grey's edition of Hudibras, was then 
in the possession of Dr. Mead. 

In Thomas Thorpe's Catalogue of County Illus- 
trations, 1838, lot 26, is the following article: 
" Twenty different Portraits of Samuel Butler, 
the author of Hudibras, remarkably choice im- 
pressions, some proofs by Nixon, after Sir Peter 
Lely, Zoust, Van Somer, Vertue, Ross, and other 
artists, embracing nearly every original portrait 
of this inimitable satirist, many of which are very 
scarce, 1744, &c. A most desirable series for 
the illustration of Hudibras. 3 3s" 



QUAINT AND CURIOUS ENTRIES IN THE 
PARISH REGISTER OF DAGENHAM, CO. 

ESSEX 

1631. Marye, daughter of a wandring woman, Bapt d ye- 

22 of Maye. 
1635. Anne, d. of a Gentilman at beansland bap. 17 Sept. 

Note after Feb. 13, 1644 : " These are the names Re- 
gestered after the Directorie wass Sect forth by order os 
parlimente. 1644." 

[From this time, for some years, the Register is badly 
spelt and badly kept.] 

1659. Mary, d. of Goodman Soanes. Bapt. Feb. 24. 

1667. Joseph, sone of . . . Russell, a London butch er, 
burnt out of house and home bapt. Nov. 1. 

1723. Jane Rogers, an adult Person of about 21 vears of 
age, bapt. Dec. y e 3 d . 

1747. John, Son of Thorn* 8 and Mary Vintner (Dissenters) 
born 22 of December. 

1653. William Norris, Farm, and Jone Crosier, y e daugh- 
ter of ... were marryed by Justice Mathew* 
y e 3 of Februarie. 
[Joachim Mathews of Romford, a noted parliamentary 

partisan.] 

1598. Seth Bassingboume, the sonne of M r . Bassing- 
bourne, Cornwer, dwellinge in St. Lawrence 
lane in London, nursed at Thomas Skinner's* 
was buried the xx th daye of Julie. 

L600. Mother Mason was bur. the 22 of Maye. 

1604. A wandering youth depted at S f . Nicholas Cootes. 

Bur. 20 th Feb. 
[Sir Nicholas Coote at this time lived at Valence, aa 

Jd moated house, still standing.] 

Hugh the Weaver was buryed the 23 March. 

605. Rachell Smith, a Londiner's Child, bur. Dec. 13. 

1606. Father Warrington was bur. April 9. 
609. Mother Sigins. Bur. 4 Feb. 
621. Jeames Benson, one y* was drowned at y c Marsh 

worke. Bur. 9 Dec. 
625. An old man from y new house in ye Forest, bur. 

y e 19 of August* 

A Trauayling wodman bur. 20 Sept. 

627. Old Mother Warrington Buryed ye 18 t]l of Feb. 

Old Mother Bateman B. 3 March. 

Old Mother Hindes. B. 13 March. 

644. The Widow Russel of the plague bur. Oct. 9> 
650. Owld Ralfe Roofe. bur. July 18. 



3* S. III. FEB. 7, '63.] 



NOTE AND QUERIES. 



103 



1665. Ould M r . Robert Comyns, Jan. 24, buried. 

Memoria justi beata. 

^Great-grandfather of Sir John Comyns, Chief Baron 
of the Exchequer, temp. Geo. II. The Comyns family 
long held a good position in this county.] 

1668. Thomas Wittam, buried 3 Aprill. Vir sobrius 

ac famas bonae. 

Timothy Crow, the Taylor, was Bur. May 21. 

1669. John, the sone of Walke in y e truthe Ayliffe, buried 

Octob. 4. 

[lam glad not to be able to connect this person with, 
the old Cavalier family of AylofFe, seated at Brittons, 
near Dagenham.] 

1670. The wife of Goodman Harvey. Dec. 3. 

1672. A Major Deringham from Mr. Harvies. Jan. 21. 

[Harvey of Wangey house, and Aldborough hatch, a 
family with which Dr. Donne was closely connected.] 

1672. Job Allibon, Gentellman, bur. July 12. 

[Father of Sir Richard Allibon, the celebrated Roman 
Catholic Judge, temp. James II., who also lies buried 
here, under a sumptuous monument.] 
1670. William Sonn of William Mayer Buried July 23. 

Mtatis 7 years allmost. 
As Carefull nurses in there Cradles lay 
those babes which would too longe . . . wanton play 
So nature his nurse for to prevent his sins in living 

Crimes (sz'c), 
hath laid him in his bed of dust ^betimes. 

1673. John White, Sen r . Gent, whoe hath giuen to the 

poor, viz.: 7 poor widdowes, twoe pence per 

week in bread for ever bur. Feb. 2. 
J674. Henery, sonn of Thomas Bonham, Esq. buried 

August 14 whose burial not paid yet. 
William Mayers, Clerk of this place 4 years, died 

at Stoke 23 June, 1674. 

[Probably author of the extraordinary effusion above 
<1670)]. ' 

1709. Goodwife Blunt, bur. June 28. 

1710. Goody Havering, bur. March 23. 

1716. A Son of Collier the Barber from Romford, bur. 
May 5. 

Sarah a D. of Dame Loveday, bur. June 21. 

1719. M r Eve, one of y Society at Rumford (A Sermon), 

bur. Oct. 18, 

M rs Wilson, wife to y c Presbyterian Minister, bur. 

Oct. 18. 

1720. Old M Ellit from Will: Staples, eatat. 90, bur. 

Jan. 12. 

1722. Goodman Compton (being 98 years of age), bur. 
Feb. 12. 

1749. A Travelling Man found Sick by y Whalebone, 
bur. Aug. y= 19. 

1752. George Joyner.who hang'd himself, deemed Luna- 
tick by the Coroners Inquest, bur. Dec. y e 18 th 

1762. Mary Mack Loughlin (a Soldier's Wife) and her 
IhP. Daughter, P.P. buried Octob 1 ye 28, By 
Virtue of the Coroner's Warrant, being killed 
by the Baggage Wagon on their march. 

1/73. A Travelling Man dyed in y e Watch house, bur. 
Nov. y e 15. 

1787. Mr Williams Higgins, related to the Whites, from 
S* Lukes Old S. Aug. 3. 

1796. Sarah, D. to Tho> Smith (niece to Countess of 
Exeter) aged 8 years, and buried June y 14. 

EDWARD J. SAGE. 

Stoke Newington. 



SHAKSPEARE, SIDNEY, AND ESSEX. 
(Continued from p. 84.) 

LETTER II. 

The following extract from Blackwood, in which 
is pointed out a grave error in Goethe's hypothe- 
tical reasoning, is particularly applicable to the 
present inquiry : 

"Goethe, in examining the depths of meaning in 
Hamlet, introduces the line, ' He's fat and scant of breath,' 
in order to give a physical clue to the intricate moral 
character of the Danish Prince. ' The fencing tires him,' 
says Wilhelm Meister ; ' and the Queen remarks, " He's 
fat and scant of breath." Can you conceive him to be 
otherwise than plump, and fair-haired? Brown -com- 
plexioned people in their youth are seldom plump ; and 
does not his wavering melancholy, his soft lamenting, his 
irresolute activity accord with such, a figure? From a 
dark-haired young man you would look for more deci- 
sion and impetuosity,' " 

On this passage, the writer remarks : ' 

"The dogmas conveyed in this criticism are neither 
historically nor physiologically correct. If, as Wilhelm 
Meister had just before asserted, ' Hamlet must be fair- 
haired and blue -eyed as a Dane, as a Northman,' 
certainly, of all the populations on the earth, the Dane, 
the Northman, has ever been the least characterised by 
' wavering melancholy ' or soft lamenting.' " 

He further adds : 

" But is it clear that the Queen's remark is intended to 
signify that Hamlet is literally fat? Does the expression 
convey any other sense than that in which a prize- 
fighter, far from corpulent, would half- sportively use it, 
in order to imply that he is out of training ? " * 

Are we not here again reminded of Sidney's 
advice to his brother, " to play at weapons, and 
let no day pass without an hour or two such exer- 
cise"? 

As Sir Philip Sidney appears to have been the 
prototype of Hamlet, we may reasonably suspect 
Fulke Greville stood for Horatio ; but Mr. Julius 
Lloyd, in his notice of the analogy between Sid- 
ney and the Prince of Denmark, adds : " Several 
curious counterparts may be observed, especially 
Horatio and Languet." (Life of Sidney, p. 74.) 

To a superficial glance this suggestion looks 
strange, and a very singular^ fancy ; but on a 
closer inspection, we find Horatio stands out, apart 
from the officers of the watch ; he is spoken of as 
a scholar, explains the political state of affairs, and 
comes direct from Germany. " I saw your father 
once " may be an allusion to Languet's visit to 
London with Prince Casimir in January, 1579, 
when they were escorted both on their arrival 
and departure by Sir Henry Sidney. I there- 
fore give in my adhesion, with a moral conviction, 
Mr. Lloyd's ingenious suggestion is a valuable 
discovery. 

Horatio, then, being Hubert Languet, the two 
friends, Marcellus and Bernardo would be Fulke 
Greviile and Edward Dyer ; and Francisco may 



Caxtoniana, p. 166. August, 1862. 



104 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 



perhaps be intended for Harvey; these three 
being Sidney's chief friends in' his earlier years. 
Nor should we overlook the singular resemblance 
between Sidney's suspicion and violence towards 
his father's secretary, Mr. Molineux, and Hamlet's 
suspiciousness and bitterness towards his two 
friends ; the fierce threat, " I'll thrust my dagger 
into you," is very near akin to "Now could I 
drink hot blood," &c. When Hamlet, on his way 
to the vessel, soliloquises : 

" Examples, gross as earth, exhort me : 
Witness this array of such mass and charge, 
Led by a tender and delicate prince ; 
Whose spirit with divine ambition puff 'd, 
Makes mouths at the invisible event." 

Act IV. S. 4, 

can we doubt the poet alludes to the arrival of 
the young Earl of Essex with Leicester at Flush- 
ing in December, 1585, of which town Sir Philip 
Sidney was the governor ; and who had only then 
commenced his military career, just one and thirty 
years old, whilst Essex was only eighteen. And 
may not the remark of Claudius 

"We have here writ 
To Norway, uncle of young Fortinbras, ' 
Who, impotent and bed-rid, scarcely hears 
Of this his nephew's purpose, to suppress 
His further gait herein." Act I. Sc. 2, 

be an allusion to the circumstance of Sir Francis 
Knollys having seriously lectured young Essex 
" of unimproved mettle, hot and full," on his ex- 
travagance in having " entered into a lavish out- 
lay to equip a band of his own " : 

" Sharking up a list of landless resolutes, 
For food and diet, to some enterprise 
That hath a stomach in't." 

This anecdote also justifies the supposition Sir 
F. Knollys is shadowed in " old Norway, uncle of 
young Fortinbras." And who can doubt that in 
Lamound we have the expression of Shakspeare's 
admiration for the master-spirit of the age, Sir 
Walter Raleigh : 

" King. Some two months hence, 

Here was a gentleman of Normandy, 
I have seen myself, and served against the French, 
And they ran well on horseback : but this gallant 
Had witchcraft in't ; he grew into his seat ; 
And to such wondrous doing brought his horse, 
As he had been incorps'd and demi-natur'd 
With the brave beast : so far he pass'd my thought, 
That I, in forgery of shapes and tricks, 
Come short of what he did. 

" Laer. A Norman was't ? 

" King. A Norman. 

" Laer. Upon my life, Lamound. 

" King. The very same. 

" Laer. I know him well ; he is the brooch, indeed, 
And gem of all the nation." Act IV. Sc. 7. 

It is scarcely necessary to mention that, on the 
death of Sir Philip Sidney, the young Earl of 
Essex became not only the Queen's favourite, but 
also the popular idol. And Hamlet says : 



" But I do prophesy the election lights 

On Fortinbras ; he has my dying voice." 
Sir Philip just before his death left Essex his best 
sword. 

If, then, young Fortinbras is the young Earl of 
Essex, old Fortinbras must be his father Walter, 
who died in Dublin in September, 1576 ; at which 
time Sir Henry Sidney was Lord-Deputy : 

" Looke you, here's a skull hath bin here this dozen yeare y 
Let me see, I ever since our last king Hamlet 
Slew Fortinbrasse in combat, young Hamlet's father, 
He that's mad." Edition, 1603. 

We here see what an ingenious use Shakspeare 
makes of the scandal against the Earl of Leices- 
ter. Shakspeare, I have no doubt, with Sidney, 
scorned the libellous insinuation, the earl had 
caused the death (of Essex by poison. It was 
clearly proved by an official investigation at the 
time, that he died of dysentery. 

But, instead of this passage, in the amended 
Hamlet^ we read : 

Ham. How long hast thou been a grave-maker ? 

" 1st Clo. Of all the days i'the year, I came to't that day 
that our last King Hamlet p'ercame Fortinbras.* 

Ham. How long is that since ? 

1st Clo. Cannot you tell that ? every fool can tell that. 
It was the very day that young Hamlet was born : he 
that was mad, and sent into England." 

" 1st Clo. I have been sexton here, man and boy, thirty 
years." -Act V. Sc. 1. 

It appears highly improbable Shakspeare can be 
here alluding to the birthday of Sir Philip Sidney, 
November 29, 1554, or thirty-four years ago ; nor 
could the clown have been appointed the grave- 
maker when a boy. I am, therefore, of opinion 
that Shakspeare refers to the day he was himself 
born, April 23, 1564. As the queen held a grand 
fete at Windsor on St. George's Day, there may 
be some allusion to a tilt or joust on that occa- 
sion. What may be the meaning, or what value 
is to be attached to this singular alteration, I 
readily leave to the decision of the reader : my 
own inferences thereon have been fully explained 
in the footsteps of Shakspeare. 

It may be problematical whether such was the 
poet's intention, but there certainly appears to be 
an allegory contained in this tragedy. In which 
case, the Queen would be Queen Elizabeth ; the 
Ghost, the Earl of Leicester; and the poison 
dropped into the ear of old Hamlet, would be the 
book called Leicester's Commonwealth, published 
in 1584, and, " for the composition of which, Lord 
Burghley is strongly suspected to have furnished 
materials and information." Of this infamous 
libel Leicester might well complain : 

"And a most instant tetter bark'd about, 
Most lazarlike, with vile and loathsome crust, 
All my smooth bod}'." Act I. Sc. 5. 

This publication appears to have driven Sir Philip 
almost as mad as Hamlet. His " answer breathes 
far too much of the fierce and implacable spirit of 



3'd s. III. FEB. 7, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



105 



his opponent. It is rather a cartel of defiance to 
his adversary, than a cool deliberate refutation of 
the calumnies which had been advanced against 
the honour and fair fame of his relative." It is in 
this Defence we have the comparison of Hercules. 
Speakin<* of the charges against the Earl, Sir 
Philip says : " The same man extremely weak of 
body, and infinitely luxurious ; the same man a 
dastard to fear anything ; the same man so ventur- 
ous, as to undertake, having no more title, such a 
matter, that Hercules himself would be afraid to 
do, if he were here among us." 

" married with mine uncle, 

My father's brother ; but no more like my father, 
Than I to Hercules." 

It may also be reasonably suspected, the strong 
emphasis laid on the incestuous marriage had a 
political meaning. Queen Elizabeth, in defence 
of her claim to the crown, " had only to rest upon 
these points : that her father's marriage with Ka- 
therine of Arragon, his brother's widow, had been 
pronounced incestuous, as contrary to the laws of 
God, and consequently beyond the power of any 
papal dispensation to render it good and valid." 
(Nares's Memoirs of Lord Burghley.} 

The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Very thin and 
transparent is the veil thrown over the charac- 
ters in this comedy. Proteus, the false friend, is 
the same as Laertes ; consequently the two old 
lords, his father and uncle, will be Lord Burgh- 
ley and Sir Nicholas Bacon; whilst Valentine is 
evidently Sir Philip Sidney in his cheerful mood. 
He was not always in " abstracted guise," buried 
in pensive thoughtfulness ; he was the author of a 
masque, the Lady of May, and Spenser speaks of 
him : 

" And he himself seemed made for merriment, 
Merrily masquing both in bower and hall." 

Astrophel. 

Silvia would of course be Lady Penelope Deve- 
reux, and Eglamour might be Mr. Waterhouse, 
her father's " faithfullest and friendliest gentle- 
man that ever he knew ; " whilst Thurio may be 
regarded rather as a portrait than a satire on 
Lord Puch. The Emperor's Court at Milan may 
be an allusion to Leicester's camp in the Nether- 
lands ; and Sir Philip commences his Defence of 
Poesy : " When the right virtuous E. W. and I 
were at the emperor's court together, we gave 
ourselves to learn horsemanship." And, again : 
"That part of the pastoral (Arcadia), where 
Pyrocles agrees to command the Helots, seems to 
have suggested those scenes of the Two Gentle- 
men of Verona, in which Valentine leagues him- 
self with the outlaws." 

Does not Valentine's jesting with Proteus about 
being" in love remind us also of Sidney's letters to 
Languet, in which he makes vehement protesta- 
tions against marriage, and Languet answers : 



" What you say in jest about a wife, I take in earnest. 
I think you had better not be so sure. More cautious 
men than you are sometimes caught ; and for my part I 
am very willing that you should be caught, that so you 
might give to your country sons like yourself. But 
whatever is to happen in this matter, I pray God that it 
may turn out well and happily. You see how nobly our 
friend Wotton has passed through his trial ; hia boldness 
seems to convict you of cowardice." Bourne, p. 116. 

One would think Shakspeare must have seen 
this letter, so completely is Valentine caught soon 
after his protestations and quizzing of Proteus. 

From this analysis, we may infer, Shakspeare 
founded the comedy of the Two Gentlemen of 
Verona on the happy loves of Astrophel and 
Stella, or such as they might have been, had Sir 
Philip discovered his love for Penelope before she 
became Lady Rich. 

Pericles. Nor is it at all improbable that in 
Pericles Shakspeare tried his prentice-hand at ex- 
pressing his love and admiration for the gentle and 
heroic character of Sidney. The remark of the 
good Lord Cerimon, "If thou liv'st, Pericles, 
thou hast a heart that even cracks for woe," re- 
minds us of the anecdote 

" As he (Sir Philip) was returning from the field of 
battle, pale, languid, and thirsty with excess of bleeding, 
he asked for water to quench his thirst. The water was 
brought, and had no sooner approached his lips, than he 
instantly resigned it to a dying soldier, whose ghastly 
countenance attracted his notice, speaking these ever- 
memorable words ' This man's necessity is still greater 
than mine.' "Zouch, p. 256. 

But we have other evidence than supposition, 
that Pericles is closely allied to Sidney, as may be 
seen in the following extracts : 

" The senate-house of the planets was at no time so set 
for the decreeing perfection in a man." Arcadia, lib. ii. 
" The senate-house of planets all did sit, 
To knit in her their best perfections." 

Pericles, Act I. Sc. 1. 

" And perceiving him (Philoclea) rose up, with a de- 
meanure, where in the Book of beautie there was nothing 
to be read but sorrow : for kindness was blotted out, and 
anger was never there." Arcadia, lib. iii. 

" Her face, the book of praises, where is read 
Nothing but curious pleasures, as from thence 
Sorrow were ever razed, and testy wrath 
Could never be her mild companion." 

Pericles, Act I. Sc. 1. 

The tennis-court is a favourite image in the 
Arcadia : 

" He quickly made his kingdom a tennis-court, where 
his subjects should be the balls." Lib. ii. 

" A man whom both the waters and the wind, 
In that vast tennis-court, hath made the ball 
For them to play upon, entreats you pity him." 
Pericles, Act II. Sc. 1. 

But the strongest evidence of the intimate con- 
nection between Pericles and Pyrocles lies in the 
following singular resemblance : as Pyrocles fights 
on one occasion in rusty armour, so does Pericles, 
and there is some jesting at each : 



10G 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. FEB. 7, '63.' 



"His armor of as old a fashion [besides the rustic 
poorness,] that it might better seem a monument of his 
grandfather's courage : about his middle he had, instead 
of bases, a long cloak of silk, which as unhandsomely as 
it needs must, became the wearer: so that all that look't 
on, measured his length on the earth already." Arcadia, 
lib. i. 

" Per. Only, my friends, I yet am. unprovided 
Of a pair of bases. 

2nd Fish. We'll sure provide : thou shalt have my best 
gown to make thee a pair." Pericles, Act II. Sc. 1. 

These items in their totality, if they exist not in 
Gower's tale, prove that the character of Pericles, 
Prince of Tyre, is founded on Pyrocles in the 
Arcadia. 

We have also in the Arcadia a faint remini- 
scence of Hamlet in the phrases, " An ape that 
had newly taken a purgation ; " and " I took a 
jewel made in the figure of a crab-fish, . . . 
because it looks one way and goes another." But 
the following passage is somewhat more to the 
purpose : 

" There was to be seen the divers manner of minds in 
distress ; some sat upon the top of the poop weeping and 
wailing, till the sea swallowed them; some one more 
able to abide death than fear of death, cut his own 
throat to prevent drowning." Lib. ii. 

Many years ago I heard the story of a man 
falling overboard in the Irish sea, and on being 
picked up by the boat's crew, and asked how his 
neck came to be wounded, he said, that horrified 
at the thought of a certain though lingering death, 
being a good swimmer, he attempted to cut his 
throat, but the knife slipped out of his hand. 
Here, then, in the Arcadia, we have evidence justi- 
fying, in the soliloquy, " To be or not to be," the 
alteration of " opposing " into " and by a poniard 
end them," as suggested by Mr. S. Bailey. 

The following extract from Leicester's Common* 
wealth, even if Shakspeare had it not in his recol- 
lection at the moment, confirms the explanation 
I have given in the Footsteps of Shakspeare of 
these lines in Hamlet : 

" King. How is it that the clouds still hang on you ? 
" Ham. Not so, my lord, I am too much i'the sun." 
"Whenever the Earl of Leicester met with cloudy 
weather at court, he could never be brought to believe 
that it was fair again, unless he felt the warmth as well 
as splendour of sunshine ; and thus every return to favour 
cost her majesty a fine for her anger, and brought him 
an ample reward for the humility of his submissions." 

(To be concluded in our next.) C. 



COLERIDGE'S EARLY POEMS, PUBLISHED 1796. 

The following scraps are from a very weakly 
poem purporting to be written by " Sara" ("but 
of which my mother told me she wrote but little." 
Biog. Lit. Biograph. Supp. chap, vi.) published 
1796. The title occupies almost a page with its 
delightful old wordiness, " The production of a 



young lady, addressed to the Author of the Poems 

alluded to in the preceding Epistle." She had 

lost her silver thimble, and her complaint being 

accidentally overheard by him, her friend, he 

immediately sent her four others to take her 

choice of. Then follow nearly seventy lines, of 

which the following only are worth reprinting : 

j" Just such a one [thimble], mon cher amie, 

The finger shield of industry." 

The lady has pricked her finger : 
" And to her eyes, suffused with watry woe, 
The flower-embroidered web danced dim, I wist. 
Like blossom'd shrubs in a quick-moving mist." 

The following clever couplet is all that is worth 
preserving of a juvenile poem (ed. 1796) never 
reprinted. It forms part of a lively description 
of a very lean husband, indicated elliptically 
thus, " V- ker." 

" So thin, that strip him of his cloathing, 
He'd totter on the edge of nothing." 

Songs of the Pixies. Lines 3 and 4, Stanza II., 
originally read 

" Ere Morn, with living gems bedight. 
Purples the East with streaky light." 

The following couplet came between line 6 and 
7 of the collected edition, and has been sup- 
pressed : 

" Richer than the deepen'd bloom, 
That glows on Summer's lily-scented plume." 

Line 13, Stanza V., originally read 

" The electric flash, that from the melting eye, 
Parts the fond question and the soft reply." 

Lines in the manner of Spenser. Line 8, 
Stanza II., originally read thus : 

" Like snow-drop opening to the solar ray." 
This is the only reading which has been altered. 

To a Young Ass. May we trace a modification 
of Coleridge's political opinions in the alteration 
noted below ? 

" Warbled melodies that soothe to rest 
The aching of pale Fashion's aching breast, " 

originally read thus : 

" Warbled melodies that soothe to rest 
The tumult of some Scoundrel Monarch's breast." 

Coleridge's " Chatterton " and " Man of Ross." 
I am not aware that the under-mentioned coin- 
cidence has formed the subject of a note in any 
edition of the works of S. T. C. Lines 5 to 11 
(inclusive), 

" Friend of the friendless," &c., 

of the " Man of Ross" (Poetical Works, 1852), 
formed portion of the Monody on the " Death 
of Chatterton," as first published in 1796. They 
are transferred, word for word (with one trifling 
exception). In 1796 the memory of the " Man 
of Ross " was just so much the poorer. The 



3" S. III. FEB. 7, '63.] . 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



107 



reader of the collected edition will observe that 
the parallel still exists, but with diminished exact- 
ness. 

Coleridge and ScMler. The first edition" of 
Coleridge's Poems (1796) contains the following 
note to the Sonnet on Schiller, which I think 
has not been reprinted : 

"One night in Winter, on leaving a College-friend's 
room, with whom I had supped, I carelessly took away 
with me The Robbers, a drama, the very name of which 
I had never before heard of : A Winter midnight the 
wind high and The Robbers for the first time ! The 
readers of Schiller will conceive what I felt. Schiller 
introduces no supernatural beings ; yet his human beings 
agitate and astonish more than all the goblin rout even 
of Shakespeare." 

J. D. CAMPBELL. 



THE REV. JAMES JOHNSTONE. 

The Rev. James Johnstone, M.A., British Chap- 
lain in Cheapinghaven towards the close of the 
last century, and afterwards Rector of Meyara- 
cross in Ireland, was a learned and amiable man. 
But he was also a poet, although this is unknown 
even to the Improved Lowndes. He published 
at Cheapinghaven, in 1786, a'small 24mo of forty- 
six pages, containing a charming old Danish bal- 
lad "Kloster-Ranet ;" together with a very 
pretty and flowing translation in English on the 
opposite side. This happily chosen and most 
appropriate trifle, which contains a congratula- 
tory head and tail-piece in Latin verse, was 
printed as a graceful compliment to the Danish 
Princess Louisa Augusta, daughter of Frederik 
VI., on her marriage with the Duke of Holstein 
Augustenborg. My library rejoices in a fine copy 
on vellum, with the above information in the 
handwriting of Mr. Johnstone himself. I copy 
the title : 

_" The Robbing of the Nunnery ; or the Abbess out- 
fitted. A Danish Ballad, translated into English in the 
style of the Sixteenth Century. MDCCLXXXVL" 

But another piece from the same pen has lately 
come into my hands. It is a quarto page ; the 
first rough sketch, all in Johnstone 1 s own hand, 
and I cannot do better than copy it as it is : 

" EPIGRAM 

(by the reverend Mr. Johnstone, Chaplain to the British 
Minister, Plenipotentiary in Denmark),* 

WRITTEN EX TEMPORE. 

On seeing the Royal family of Danmark on board the 
yacht. (Presented to H. R. H., The Crown prince, by his 
Oncle the King of England in 1785).* 
" See Dania's King ! the Chief of Odin's race, 

Her Princes blooming in each youthful grace : 

Her Royal Fair, the pride of every land, 

Her gentle Rozenkrantz; her virgin band; 

* The italics in parenthesis are added afterwards, ap- 
parently by the same hand. 



See all her hopes, born on the British plank, 
Brave the rude surge, that beats the rocky bank ; 
Fearless they pass the adverse rival shores, 
And scorn the tempest blustering round the roars ! 

Attend, Britannia ! and with grateful sense 
Rate high this mark of boundless confidence ; 
While wake thy thunders, while thy navies float, , 
Let ne'er such ties of Friendship be forgot. 
Let sea-girt Lochlin, when oppress'd by foes, 
On Morven ne'er in vain her hope repose ; 

MAY BOTH THEIR FLEETS IN COMMON TRIUMPH RIDE, 
OK SINK WITH GLORIOUS RUIN ON THE BLOODY TIDE." 

Every true Englishman will heartily join in 
this prayer. The northern lands should be one, 
and should stand or fall together. 

GEORGE STEPHENS. 

Cheapinghaven, Denmark, Jan. 27, 1863. 

P.S. Rozenkrantz, in line 4, refers to the Rosy 
Garland on board the royal female children. 
Born, 5th line, would now be written borne. The 
last the, in line 8, means or is misspelt for thee. 
Lochlin for Denmark, and Morven for Britain, 
were at that time poetical common places. 



THEOSOPHY. 

" MEMORIAL OF WILLIAM LAW AND OTHER 

THEOSOPHERS." 
\_Addressed to the Public by the Medium of N. and Q.] 

The following is a LIST OF LIBRARIES through- 
out Great Britain and her dependencies, the 
United States of America, &c., where have been 
deposited for reference, copies of the "Notes 
and Materials for a Memorial of William Law " 
and the "Introduction to Theosophy." ["N. & Q." 

20 April 1861, p. 306 ; 30 May 1857, p. 421 ; 

21 March 1857, p. 225 ; 17 May 1856, p. 395 ; 
10 Sept. 1853, p. 248, &c.] 

The object of these publications, and of their 
distribution as here stated, is to induce and pro- 
mote, in a general manner, the study of pure 
metaphysical science, (commencing at its root and 
ground in Deity, thence through all those prin- 
ciples of Nature, eternal and temporal, of mind, 
spirit and body, which redevelope and concentre 
themselves, in the form, constitution and support 
of man, as such,) with a view to render it sub- 
servient to its true end and design, namely, the 
radical purification of theology, throughout the 
earth, and the final resolution of it into a fixed, 
progressive science and art, as contemplated and 
provided for, by Christianity. The art consisting 
in a knowledge and application of the mode and 
horticultural means of awakening, training and 
exalting into sublime maturity of developernent, 
the moral principle of man, with its latent embryo 
life of divine intellect and force, or * seed of the 
word,' the Spirit, the holy spiritual body, ' body 
and blood,' or nature, of the glorified second 
Adam, (John vii. 39) involving of course a cor- 



108 



NOTES AND QUEK1ES. 



[3*4 S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 



relative reduction and translocation of the animal 
and diabolic principles of the mind, with their 
respective qualifications, spirits and lights, into 
their due place, order and subserviency. 

It is surely needless to expatiate upon the be- 
neficial effects of such a renovation of theological 
philosophy, as here proposed, and now rendered 
feasible of accomplishment, through the pioneer- 
ship and instrumentality of these publications. 
They may be said in sum, to comprise everything 
that the human mind requires for its happiness, 
and to constitute the highest results of the perfect 
application of Christian vital force and truth. 

Elucidations on this head, as of the science as 
well as the art into which theology must indeed, 
finally be resolved, may be given in a future 
number of N. and Q., or in answer to special in- 
quiries. 

For the guidance of such as may desire to enter 
upon the study of pure metaphysical science, and 
of the philosophy of the Christian religion in par- 
ticular, (they being duly grounded in evangelical 
practice,) the following-named treatises, in the 
order set down, are here incidentally named for 
that end: (1.) Introduction to Theosophy, (2.) 
Law's Appeal, (3.) Law's Spirit of Prayer, (4.) 
Law's Way to Divine Knowledge, (5.) Law's Spirit 
of Love, and (6.) Letters, (7.) Memorial of Law 
with its references. The treatises numbered 2, 3, 
4, 5, 6, (which are now scarce to be met with,) 
were intended, by re-publication, to constitute 
Vols. 2 and 3 of the " Introduction to Theosophy ", 
their titles or divisional headings having been 
first re-arranged for that object, after the manner 
of the divisions of Vol. 1 ; but this design remains 
yet to be carried out, as likewise the editorship 
and publication of the remaining volumes of the 
proposed series by some future qualified, and 
noble-minded philanthropist. 

In the following LIST OF LIBRARIES/ the titles 
of the institutes, as Literary, Scientific, Mechanics', 
Society, etc., though abbreviated, will be easily 
apprehensible. Where a * is found placed before 
the name of an institute, it is to signify that the 
copy of " Law's Memorial " in that library, has 
been corrected throughout with the pen ; and where 
a t, that there the copy is likewise fully corrected 
with the pen, but somewhat variedly. Where no 
* or f appears, it is to signify that the copies in 
such libraries are uncorrected, and that they 
require correction with the pen, after some fully 
corrected copy, as designated. 



Libraries of Metropolis, *Lond. Mech. Inst *City Loud. Coll 

*Roy. Soc. Lit In. Temple Lib *Mid. Temp. Lib *Linc. Inn 
Lib *Roy. Coll. Physicians.-* Roy. Med. Chirur. Soc._#Roy. Coll. 
Surgeons *Soc. Arts *8oc. Antiquaries *Young Men's Chr. Assoc. 
-*Marylebpne Lit. I._tBrit. Mus.-tSion Coll t Williams' Lib 
+Congreg. Lib tBap. Coll., R. P._ tNew Coll. Lib tHackney Theo. 
Sem tWesl. Miss. Ho.-Lond. Inst.-Lond. Lib Beaumont Phil. 



1 The selection of the British Libraries, in the absence of exact 
knowledge concerning their suitability, has been made from the 
Government Census Report on Education of 1854, and from the List 
of Institutions in union with the Society of Arts 



InstWestm., Marg. Pub. Lib Piml. Lit. Inst Walw. Lit. In.- 

Qf 'Great Britain. A. Aberdeen. *Mech. In.; tUniv. Coll.; R. C 

Coll., Blairs Alnwick. M. I Andover. Cler. Read. Soc Asaph 

R. C. Coll.-Aylesbury. M. I. 

B. Barnstaple. *L. I Bath. Com. L. I Basingstoke. M. I._ 
Barnsley. M. I. Soc Banbury. M. I Barnard Castle. M. I. Soc.- 

Bedford. L.I tSt. Bee's Coll Birmingham. tMid. Inst.; Queen's 

Coll. (uncorr.); *Friends' Read. Soc.; Dissent. Coll., Moseley; R. C. 
Coll., Oscott Birkenhead. tAidan's Coll.- Blackburn. M. I Boston. 
Athen Bolton. M. I Brighton. *Y. Men's C. A Bradford. M.I.; 
Airedale Coll., Undercliffe-Bristol. City Lib. (2 cops.); Baptist Coll. 
Brecon. Ind. Coll Burnley. +M. I Bury Athen Burton L. Soc. 

C. Cambridge. #Free Lib.; all 17 Colls. Libs. (tEman.); tUniv. 
Lib., 2 cops. (1 uncorr.) Canterbury. L. S. In.; t August Coll. Car- 
marthen. Lit. Inst.; Presb. Coll Cardiff. *Free Library Chatham. 

#M. I Chester. *M. I. Cheltenham Chelmsford M. I_ 

Chichester. M. I. tEp. Theo. Coll Cheshunt. Theo. Coll Chester- 
field. R. C. Coll.-Colchester. L. ICoventry. tM.I Colne. M.I. 
tCuddesdon. Ep. Coll. 

D. Darlington. M.I Derby. *M. I Devonport. M. I Dover. 

Museum Lib Dorchester. Dorset Co. Lib Dundee. Brechin M.I. 
Dumfries. *M. I Durham. tThe 3 Univ. Colls.; R. C. Coll., 

fef Edinburgh. tAdvoc. Lib.; tUniv. Coll.; tFree Church. Coll.; 
*Mech. Sub. Lib.; Cong. Theo. Hall Ely. M. I.-Exeter. tDev. 
and E.Lib.; E. Lit. Soc. 

F. Faversham. F. Inst Falmouth. Pub. Lib Fife, t And. Coll.- 
Frome. Lit. I. 

0. Glasgow. *Athen.; *M. L; tUniv. Coll.; tFree Church Coll.; 
tEv. Un. Theo. Acad.; Anderson Un. Lib.; Bap. Coll Gloucester. 
*Lit. Ass Greenwich. Usef. K. Soc Guildford. Inst Guernsey. 

Hi Halifax. *M. I. SocHastings. M. I Harrogate. M. L. I._ 

Haverfordwest. L. Inst Hereford. Lit. Soc Hertford. Free Pub. 

Lib Hexham. M. I.-Hitchin. M. I Hinckley. R. C. Priory 
Huddersfield. *M. I Hull. *M. I.; tAlbion St. Lib Huntingdon. 
Lit. In. 

1. Inverness. *M. I Ipswich. *M. I. 

K. J K7f g y hley PU M.L^Kendal. *M. I-Keswick. .Lit. Soc. 

Li. Lancaster. M. I Lampeter. tDavid's Coll Leeds. #M. L; 

tCircul. Lib.; Rawdon, Bap. Coll Leicester. *M. I U. Leamington. 

Inst Liverpool. * Free Pub. Lib.; M. I Lichfield. Free Lib.; 
1 Theo. Coll Lincoln. Lincolnshire M. I Lowestoft. M.I Louth. 
ill. 

Free Lib. ; *Chetham ColL; 

*M. L; *Athen. Lib.; Cavendish Theo. Coll.; Lane. Ind. Coll.; tWesl. 
Didsbury Coll Maidstone. *M. I Macclesfleld. Y. Men's C. A._ 
Malton. L. I Merthyr Tydvil. tSub. Lib. 

IV. Newcastle Tyne. *M. L; Lit. Phil. Soc.: Gateshead M.I New- 
castle Lyme. Lit. I Newport (I. Wight). *M. I Newport (Wales). 



M. I Loughborough. R. C. Ratcliffe Coll 
M. Manchester. *Free Lib. ; *Salford F 



M. I Nottingham. *M. I Northampton. *M. I.; U. K. Soe~- 
Norwich. *Pub. Lib Newbury. Lit. I. 

O. Oldham. Lye Oxford. *Pub. Lib.; tBodleian; all the 2iColli. 
Libs. (tSt. John's). 

P. Paisley. Artiz. Inst Peterborough. M. I Penzance. *Pub. 

Lib Perth. tEo. Coll Plymouth. *M. I. ; P. Cott. Lib Portsea. 

M. I Poole. *M. I Pontypool. Bap. Coll Preston. *Diff. U. K. 
lost 

B.' Reading. *M. I Ripon. M. L. I Richmond, (Sur.) Wesl. 
Theo. Coll Rochdale. * -Rotheram. Lit. S.; Indt. Coll. 

S.Scarborough. *M. I Sheffield. *Free Pub. Lib.; Ath. M. I._ 
Shrewsbury. *Shrop. M. I Sheerness. M. I Southampton. *(Hart. 

In.) Pub. Lib Stafford. *M. I Stamford. M. I Stoke. Ath. L. 

I Stourbridge. Town Lib Stockton. L. Inst Stirling. *Mac 

Farl. Free Lib Sunderland. Lit. Soc Sudbury. M. I Swindon. 
M. I Swansea. *Roy. Inst. 

T. Taunton. Somerset I Tavistock. Tav. In Tiverton. Lit. In. 
Tunbiidge Wells. Useful K. In. 

U. Ulverstone. Atheneum. 

IV. Wakefield. M.I.; Westgate. Ch. Lib. (uncorr.) Warnngton. 
*Museum Lib. ; M. I Ware. Edmund's R. C. Coll Wells. tEp. 

Theo. Coll Whitehaven. M.I Whitby. Inst. Pop. Art- Wigan. 

M. I Winchester. M. I Windsor, Eton. Lit. M. I Wolverhamp- 
ton. W. Lib. 

Y. York. *Inst. Pop. Sci.; R. C. Coll., Ampleforth. 

Ireland. Dublin. +Trin. Coll.; * Roy. Dub. Soc [Libraries of Cork, 
Belfast. Waterford, Galway, Sli go, Limerick, etc., Copies yet to be sent 

R. C. Colleges. Univ. St. Patrick ; Maynooth Coll.; Carlow Coll.; 
Drumcondra Miss. Coll. ; Stillorgan Coll. ; Castlenock Eccles. Sem. ; 
Tuam Coll. ; Armagh Coll. ; Thurles Coll. ; Clane Coll., Kildare ; 
Esker Coll.. Athenry, Galway ; Kynan's Coll., Kilkenny. 

Canada Libraries. Quebec. *Laval Univ.; *Lit. Soc.; Canadian 
Inst.; the Parliament Lib Three Rivers. M.I.-Hamilton. Merc. 
Lib. Assoc. -Kingston. *Uuiv. Queen's Coll.; M. I.-Loudon. Merc. 
Lib. Ass.; M. IMontreal. *Univ. M'Gill's Coll.; Can. Inst.; 

M. I.; Merc. Lib. Ass Ottawa. M. I. ; Canad. M._ Toronto. 

tUniv. I. ; *Trin. Coll. ; *M. L; Can. Cong. Theo. ; Cong. Coll. 
B. N. A. ; Knox's Coll. ; Presb. Divin. Hall ; Can. In Brock- 
ville. Lit. Ass. M. IBelleville. Lit. Ass.-Guelph. M. IPort 
Hope. M. I Cobourg. *Univ. Victor. Coll.-Lennoxville. *Umv. 
Bishop's Coll St. Catharine's. M. I Niagara. M. I. 

Nova Scotia. Halifax Lib Acadia Coll. Lib. 

India. Calcutta. Univ. Lib.; Presid. Coll.; *Hindoo Metrop. Coil- 
Public Lib.; Soc. Arts Lib.; Trade Ass. Soc Benares. Coll [Aladras 
and Bombay. Copies yet to be sent to Pub. Libs.] 

Ceylon. Colombo. *U. Civ. and Mil. Serv. Lib Kandy. *U. Civ. 
and M. Serv. Lib Galle. * Lib. 

Australia. Sydney. * Austral. Lit. Soc Melbourne. *. . . . . .L,iD. 

-Adelaide. *So. Austr. Inst Perth. sSwan Riv. M.I. (Additional 
copies to be sent to Austr. Colleges on request.) Tasmania. Hobart 
Town *M. I. New Zealand. Auckland *Y. Men's C. Ass.; *M. I. 

The Cape. tCape Town Lib tGraham's Town Lib Natal. Pieter- 
maritzburgh, * ... Lib. 



3'* S. III. FEB. 7, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



109 



Gibraltar. *Garrison Lib. 

France. Paris. tBibliot. Imper.; tSoc. Asiat.; tlnst. de France 
Yvetot. *Inst. Eccles Copies also in Pub. Libs, of Gcerlitz, Mtinchen, 
Morimburgh, Amsterdam, Leyden; Florence (.Vieusseux's Lib.,) etc. 

United States (A.) Libraries. Maine. Bowdoin Coll.; Waterville 
Coll. New Hampsh. Dartmouth Coll Vermont. Univ. Vermont; 
Middlebury Coll.; Norwich Univ Massachuss. Harwood. Coll.; Wor- 
cester. Coll.; AVilliamatown Coll.; Amherst Coll.; Andover Theo. 
Sem. : *Boston Lib Rhode Isl. Brown, Univ Connectic. Yale. Coll.; 
Hertford Trin. Coll.; Middletown Wesl. Univ._New York. Columbia 
Coll.; Union Theol. Sem.; #Astor Lib.; Schenectady Un. Coll.; Ha- 
milton Coll.; Madison Univ.; Hobart Tree Coll.; Univ. New York; 
Univ. Rochester; Fordham, John's Coll.; Auburn Theol. Sem; Pough- 
keepsie Lye New Jersey. Burlington Coll.; New Bruns., Rutger's 
Coll.: Princetown Coll Pensylvnnia. Univ. Pens.; Gerard's Coll.; 
Dickinson Coll.; Jefferson Coll.; Washington Lib.; *Smithsonian 
Inst.; Allegheny Coll.; Pensyl. Coll.; Lafayette Coll.; Lancaster, 
Franklin Coll.; Univ. Lewisburgh.-Delaware. Newark, Del. Coll.- 
Maryland. Annapolis, John's Coll.; Washington, James Coll.; Balti- 
more. B. Lib.; Mary's Coll Columb. Dist. Georgetown Coll.; 
Columb. CoU.-Ohio. Ohio Univ.'; Miami Univ.; Franklin Coll.; 
Western Reserve Coll.; Kenyon Coll.; Denison Coll.; Marietta Coll. ; 

Oberlin Coll.; Ohio Wesl. Univ.; Cleveland Univ Indiana. Hanover 

Coll.; Wabash Coll.; Ashbury Univ.-Illinois. Knoi Coll.; Illinois 
Coll.; Mr. KendreeColl.; Univ. ChicagoMichigan. Univ. Mich.- 
Wisconsin. Lawrence Univ.; Wiscons. Univ.; Beloit Coll Southern 
States. Copies packed and directed, for delivery by mail, to the fol- 
lowing addresses, are lying at C. Scribner & Co., Brook Bdgs, Grand St., 
Broadway, New York Tennessee. Nashville Univ.; JKast Tenn. 
Coll.; Cumberland Univ.; Jackson Coll.; Union Coll.; Grenville Coll. 
Kentucky. Transylvania Coll. ; Danville, Centre College. 

There are about twenty copies left of the " Me- 
morial," for further distribution to suitable in- 
stitutions, as above intimated. 

Communications respecting the publications in 
question, or on the subjects of their contents, or 
proposals to join in the expense of publishing the 
remaining volumes of the " Introduction to Theo- 
sopby" (as specified in the " Guide " l pamphlet 
bound up with the " Memorial of Law," to con- 
sist of some twenty or thirty volumes,) may be 
addressed to the Editor of Law's Memorial, at 
No. 24, Ludgate-street, London. C. WALTON. 



Minat 

EDWARD YOUNG. In Mr. Peter Cunningham's 
edition of Johnson's Lives of the Poets (iii. 332), 
under the " Life of Dr. Young," occurs this pas- 
sage : 

" It is related by Mr. Spence in his Manuscript Anec- 
dotes, on the authority of Mr. Kawlinson, that Young, 
upon the publication of his Universal Passion, received 
from the Duke of Wharton two thousand pounds." 

In Mr. Cunningham's note upon this, he says : 
" In all the editions of these Lives that I have seen it 
' Grafton,' but ' Wharton ' is the Spence reading." 
If there is any doubt about the name of the 
particular Duke, why should it not be Chandos ? 
The Princely Chandos ! " who, about the same 
period, had presented to Pope five hundred, or 
as some say, a thousand pounds ; and it is the 
more probable, as Young seems by the following 
hues to have sent the Duke of Chandos a presen- 
tation copy of his Satires, then (about 1728) first 

: 



collected under the title of the Universal Pas- 
sion : 

TO HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF CHANDOS. 

Accept, my Lord, the Satire which I send, 

For who to Satire is so fit a Friend ? 

Others with censure will the Verse pursue, 

And just their hate, to give my Foes their due ; 

You safely may support a Muse severe, 

And praise those talents which you ne'er can fear. 

From other Great Ones I can tribute raise 

Of Vice or Folly, to enrich my Lays ; 

But Chandos, an Unprofitable Thing, 

Can nought on earth, but his Protection bring. 

I believe that these verses have not been 
printed. WILLIAM JAMES SMITH. 

Conservative Club. 

HARLEY AND PRIOR. If the following couplet, 
by Matthew Prior, has not yet appeared in 
"N.& Q.," it will doubtless be acceptable to your 
readers. It is preserved in the library at Wim- 
pole, once the receptacle o* the Harleian MSS., 
and of the magnificent library of Lord Oxford, 
where Prior spent so much of his time, and was 
copied by the writer there. 

The autograph appears as follows : 
" Fame counting thy books, my dear Harley, shall tell, 

No man had so many and knew them so well. 

" Written in the Library, Dec. 2, 1720. 

" M. P." 
FRANCIS TRENCH. 

Islip, Oxford. 

GRADUATES or AMERICAN COLLEGES. Permit 
me to suggest the transfer of the following note 
from the pages of The Historical Magazine and 
Notes and Queries of America, to your own. 
Many of your genealogical readers have long felt 
the want of lists such as those mentioned therein. 
Few have known where to find them : 

"Lists of the Graduates of American Colleges. In the 
American Quarterly Register, a periodical published at 
Boston, Mass., from 1829 to 1843 are lists of the gradu- 
ates of American colleges and others who received de- 
grees at those colleges to the year 1841. The first list is 
printed in the seventh volume, and occupies pp. 93132, 
181245, and 289343. This was prepared by John 
Farmer. It gives the names alphabetically arranged of 
recipients of degrees at the several New England col- 
leges from their foundation to the times mentioned as 
follows, viz.: of Harvard, to and including 1834; Yale, 
1834; Brown, 1830; Williams, 1833; Vermont, 1828; 
Bowdoin, 1834; Middlebury, 1832; Waterville, 1834; 
Amherst, 1834 ; and Washington, 1834. The second list 
is printed in the eleventh volume occupying pp. 145 
159, 290308, and 415449. The preparation of this 
was commenced by John Farmer, who completed the 
portion ending on p. 159, with the assistance of Moses 
Chamberlain, Junr. of Concord. The remainder of the list 
was prepared \>y Mr. Chamberlain under the super- 
vision of the Editors of, the Quarterly Register, Kev. Drs. 
Edwards and Cogswell. It gives the names, also alpha- 
betically arranged, of those who received degrees at the 
several colleges in the States of New York and New 
Jersey to the year 1834, with the exception of Hamilton 



110 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 



Institution, Geneva College, and the University of New 
York, from which lists of graduates could not bo ob 
tained. The third list, which is in the fifteenth volume 
is by Mellew Chamberlain of Concord. It occupie 
pp. 137161, 276297, and 446491. It gives an al 
phabetical arrangement of the names of persons receiving 
degrees at the several colleges in New England, New 
York, and New Jersey, from 1834 and at other college 
in the United States from their foundation to 1841." 
Vol. vi. p. 62. 

EDWARD PEACOCK. 
Bottesford Manor, Brigg. 

MARQUESS OF LANSDOWNE. The death of Lore 
Lansdowne within one day of the anniversary o; 
that of Charles I. 214 years ago, reminds me o; 
a fact which I think is well worth recording in 
your columns, because it shows over what a long 
number of years three lives often extend. 

Some years since Lord Lansdowne told my in- 
formant that he remembered, when a boy, to have 
shaken hands with General Godwin, whose father 
was page to Charles I.* E. S. S. W. 

GAUNT'S HOSPITAL, BRISTOL. The following 
notes are from the Registers of Wells Cathedral, 
and may prove interesting to some of the Bristol 
readers of " N. & Q." 

" A.D. 1272. In this year the Dean and Chapter (of 
Wells) paid to John de Trubrugge, Master of the House 
or Hospital of S 1 Marke de Bylleswyke of Bristol, and 
the brethren, XC Marks, or Sixty pounds, and then 
the Master and brethren oblige their House to pay a 
yearly stipend of Sixty-three shillings and fourpence to 
the Dean and Chapter, of which four Marks, or 21. 13s. 4d., 
were to be paid to a Chantry Priest to pray for the soul 
of John de Hereford, Canon of Wells ; and ten shillings 
to 'the attendants at the anniversary obitual Mass for 
the said Canon. s d 

Reg. Well. f. 117 ; Reg. 3, f. 386 - 2 13 i 
Annuaks,17S - - - - - 0100 

B 3 4 

"In the same year the Executors of William de Ku- 
mene (or Rumere) formerly Treasurer of Wells, and John 
of Hereford, Canon, having paid to the same Master and 
Brethren of St. Marke de Bylleswyke, the sum of 160 
Marks, or 807. the said Master and Brethren oblige them- 
selves to pay a yearly pension of 41. 3s. 4d. to the Church 
of Wells. Reg. 3, f. 190, 191 ; Annuales, 178. 

1 This pension the Mayor and Chamber of Bristol pay 
to the Chapter ever since the dissolution of St. Mark's 
house. 

"1336. In this year, Bishop John of Drokensford 
appropriated the Parsonage of Overstowey to the Master 
and House of St. Mark's, Bristol/reserving a pension of 
XL shillings to be paid to the fabrick of the Cathedral of 
Wells. Reg. f. 165, 166. Reg. 3, f. 190 ; Annuales, f. 

62 '. * A 

Chantry - - - - - -434 

Fabrick - - - - _ -200 
<j 3 4 

[* No journal devoted to Literature can record the 
decease of this distinguished nobleman without an ex- 
pression of regret for the loss which literature has sus- 
tained m the death of one who, himself a scholar, was 
eminently the friend of scholars. ED. "N & Q "] 



" This pension is paid by the Mayor and Chamber of 
Bristol." 

These notes are transcribed from a MS. in the 
handwriting of Dr. Samuel Creswick, Dean of 
Wells, who became Dean in 1739 and died in 
1766. INA. 

Wells, Somerset. 

A LOVER'S FAREWELL TO HIS MISTRESS : ENG- 
LISH, LATIN. 

" Jenny, while now your name I hear, 

No transient glow my bosom heats ; 
And when I meet your eye, my dear, 
My flutt'ring heart no "longer beats. 

" I dream, but I no longer find 

Your form still present to my view ; 
I wake, but now my vacant mind, 
No longer waking, thinks of you. 

" I can find maids in every route, 

With smiles as false, and forms as fine ; ' 
But you must search the world throughout 
To find a heart as true as mine." 

These lines are from Dr. Syntax's Tour, p. 31,. 
8vo, 1813. The same subject is treated by 
Praed, in some verses composed by him at Eton ;. 
but, if he had the English ones before him, lie 
has missed the pretty turn at the end. I subjoin 
a copy of the Latin verses, transcribed from* 
memory : 

" Qualis ab hesterno servatus navita ponto, 
Mane procellosam. respicit udus aquam ; 
Aut qualis rubra recubans bellator in herba, 
Martis sanguineos eminus horrit equos; 

" Talis ego, infida servatus amoris ab unda, 
Corda dolens Paphise vulnera dura Deas, 
Heu, reputo quodcunque tuli ! tandemque remitto 
Fluctibus extremum militiceque ' Vale !' 

" Laura vale ! nee thura tibi, nee dona parabo ; 

Laura vale ! maneas libera, liber ero. 
Non magis, aestivam cum Luna reduxerit umbramv- 
Aspiciet nostras clausa fenestra faces ; 

" Nee magisi hyberna dum pallet terra pruinS, 

Janua suspensS fiet odora rosa, 
Haec verba, infirmo, fateor, trepiclantia plectro 
Ultima tristitise sunt monumenta meae." 

W.D. 

REMINISCENCES or CAMBRIDGE. I append ;j 
ew Notes and Queries on Gunning's Remini- 
cences : 

(Vol. i. p. 101.) Mention has been lately made 
n " N. & Q." of aristocratic mayors : the Duke of 
Norfolk is chronicled, in loc. supr. cit, as Mayor of 
Hereford in 1788. 

(Vol. i. p. 184.) Are any of the Epigrams on 
larwood and Farmer, most of which were con- 
ributed by Tweddell, extant ? 

(Vol. i. p. 245.) "The ministry determined to 
get rid of him (Home Tooke), which was at length 
effected by a declaratory bill, on account of his 
being in holy orders : although it was notorious 
that in every Parliament men so circumstanced had 



3^ S. III. FEB. 7, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



Ill 



taken their seats without opposition" * What in- 
stances are there of this ? 

(Vol. ii. p. 45.) For what reason was the pub- 
lication of The Cambridge Calendar omitted in 
1798? [See 2 nd S. vi. 535.] 

(Vol. ii. p. 81.) The note, as quoted by Mr, 
Gunning, is made up of two by Tweddell ; the 
first part being taken from a note appended to 
the Oration delivered in the schools ; the seconc 
from the title to the same composition. (See pp 
xvii. 86, of the Prolusiones, 8vo, ed. 1793.) Th< 
individual complimented was Dr. Pearce, Master 
of Jesus College. 

(Vol. ii. p. 94.) In these days, it is curious to 
note the first germs of the anti-celibacy move- 
ment. 

(Vol. ii. p. 114.) Are Porson's lines on the 
" Seniority " of his day extant ? 

(Vol. ii. p. 137.) What was the title of the 
"very extraordinary work on the French Revo 
lution " by T. Castley of Jesus ? 

N.B. Castley died in the latter part of the year 
1860, aged ninety-five; his father, Senior Wrang- 
ler and Second Medallist in 1755, having lived to 
the age of 100. (From The Cambridge Chronicle, 
but I have lost the reference to the date.) 

(Vol. U. p. 351.) Who was the " young friend," 
author of the Chafy letter ? See an allusion and 
variety in the way of spelling in " N. & Q." 1 st S. 
vi. 80 ; and also a communication as to the "For- 
tunate Youth " (Gunning, ii. 304, seqq.} in 2 nd S. 
xii. 170. P. J. F. GANTLLLON. 

2, Pittville Parade, Cheltenham. 

MILTON'S WORKS. The list of the editions of 
Milton's Worlis should be as complete as that of 
Shakspeare's. I have a copy of the Paradise 
Regained, London, 1756, small 12mo ; printed for 
J. and R. Tonson, and others : containing also, the 
" Samson Agonistes," "Sacred Odes," "L' Allegro," 
"II Penseroso," "Arcades," " Comus," "Lycidas," 
the Latin poems, and the tractate of Education to 
Mr. Hartlib. This is not in Bohn's Lowndes. 

J. HENRY SHORTHOUSE. 

Edgbaston. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE CIVIL WAR IN NORTH 
AMERICA. Students of contemporary history 

j will be obliged to you if you will permit me to 
inform them through your pages that The His- 

, torical Magazine and Notes and Queries of Ame- 
rica has from time to time published lists of civil 
war literature. They are of course imperfect, 
but still very valuable, especially to English 
readers. One desire of the Editor is evidently 
to make it as comprehensive as possible. See 
Vol. vi.pp. 113, 14G, 186, 206, 245, 342. 

K. P. D. E. 



The italics are mine. 



ANONYMOUS PUBLICATIONS. To what authors 
respectively are we to ascribe the following pub- 
lications ? 

1. Clontarf, a Poem, 18mo, Dublin, 1822. 

2. The Picture of Parsonstown, in the King's 
County. 8vo. Dublin, 1826. 

3. Three Months in Ireland, by an English Pro- 
testant. Sm. 8vo. London, 1827. 

4. Notes of a Journey in the North of Ireland. 
12mo. Dublin, 1828. ABHBA. 

BEBINGTON FAMILY. It is stated in Lysons's 
Magna Britannia, that " the family of Bebington 
of Bebington, in Cheshire, became extinct in the 
elder branch in the reign of Richard II. A 
younger branch settled at Nantwich, and is sup- 
posed to be also extinct : seven males of thi& 
family, viz. six brothers and an uncle, were slain 
at Flodden Field." 

In a pedigree of Bebington (Harl. MS. 1537),. 
Randall Bebington, with his five nephews Wil- 
liam, James, Randall, John, and Charles (sons of 
Robert) are entered as having been slain at the 
" Scotch field ;" but no mention is made in the 
pedigree of the death of a sixth nephew at 
Flodden. 

Can any correspondent inform me where I can 
find an account of this family ? and whether any 
male descendants of the family are living ? 

ALGERNON BRENT, 

BRILLIANTS. In what work will be found some 
particulars of the Order of Brilliants, of which 
Joseph Haslewood, the literary antiquary, in his 
early days was a luminous member ? J. Y. 

STORY or BELLERUS. Can any of your numer- 
ous students of archaic story throw any light on 
the fable of Bellerus ? 

" Or, whether thou, to our moist vows deny'd, 
Sleep'st by the fable of Bellerus old." 

Milton's Lycidas. 

I have searched Geoffrey of Monmouth, Dray- 
ton's Polyolbion, and other promising books, in 
vain. Keightley, in his Poems of Milton, &c., says 
n reference to this passage : 

" At length Wharton threw light on this, as on many 
)ther obscure places. He showed that the place, called 
>y the poet ' the fable of Bellerus old,' was St. Michael's 
Mount at the Land's End, in Cornwall, anciently named 
Bellerium; from which the poet formed the name Bel- 
erus, as that of one of the fabulous old giants, who, 
according to Geoffrey of Monmouth, possessed Britain in 
ld time." 

There is an error in this passage. St. Michael's 
Mount was never called Bellerium, but that name 
appears to have been anciently given to the Land's 
End itself. 

" The great vision of the guarded Mount," 



112 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3 rd S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 



which is merely spoken of by the poet as being 
near to, or comprehended by, the fabled land of 
Bellerus, is clearly an allusion to the vision of 
St. Michael appearing on St. Michael's Mount ; 
the- distance between St. Michael's Mount and 
the Land's End is, par excellence, the Land of 
the Giants. I have been for many years col- 
lecting the legends of these Cornish Titans ; and 
being desirous of learning if Milton had in his 
mind any special descendant of " Albion, a giant, 
son of Neptune, who called the island after his 
own name, and ruled it forty-four years" as he 
informs us in his History of Britain I have ven- 
tured to intrude my inquiry amongst the readers 
of"N.&Q." K.H. 

COMENIUS, " OEBIS PICTUS." Why is there no 
notice taken in Lowndes of the translation of the 
Orbis Sensualium Pictus of John Amos Comenius, 
of which twelve editions had appeared by 1777? 
I have a copy of the twelfth of that date. Mr. 
Wright, in his recent History of Domestic Man- 
ners in the Middle Ages, gives an engraving from 
the first edition. Would he, or anyone else, tell 
me whether the engravings were much altered in 
the different editions ? Even in so late a copy as 
mine, it is a very interesting book. 

J. HENRY SHORTHOUSE. 

Edgbaston. 

^ BLANCH DAVIS. Can any reader of " N. & Q." 
give me any information regarding Blanch Davis, 
author of Octavia, a drama, Doncaster, 1832 ? 

R.I. 

DIOCESAN LIBRARIES IN IRELAND. Ledwich, 
in his Antiquities of Ireland (p. 420, 2nd edit.), 
makes mention of the following : St. Canice, 
Kilkenny, founded by Bishop Otway ; St. Sepul- 
chre's, Dublin, by Archbishop Marsh; Cork, by 
Bishop Browne; Derry, by Archbishop King; 
Raphoe, by Bishop Foster ; and Armagh, by Pri- 
mate Robinson. Have catalogues of the foregoing 
been printed ? And are there any other diocesan 
libraries in Ireland ? ABHBA. 

GENTILHOMME. While travelling in France 
last year, I was more than once required to give 
my name and description, and I hesitated whether 
to write myself gentilhomme. I am aware that the 
term implies nobility, but what English commoner 
is noble in this sense ? Is, for example, the son 
of a duke's younger son noble ? Is Macintosh of 
Macintosh, The Chisholm, The O'Donoughue, 
Sir E. Bulwer-Lytton, Sir Claude Champion de 
Crespiney, Forbes Laird of Culloden, or other 
Scotch Lairds, English Lords of Manors, or gen- 
tlemen of coat armour, with or without landed 
estate ? Where is the line to be drawn ? &. 

KING, OF YEOVIL, co. SOMERSET. I have been 
reading lately some memoirs of a family of this 
name, formerly residing in this town, and should 



be glad to get more particulars, if I can meet with 
them. 

George King, of Yeovil, married one of three 
sisters of the name of Phelips, " a genteel but de- 
cayed family." He left MS. Memoirs, and ap- 
pears to have been a somewhat remarkable person 
in many respects. His son, John King, was a 
bookseller at Yeovil, and mayor several times 
(circa 1790), and a particular friend of Locke, 
author of the Western Rebellion. 

Any local genealogist who can give information 
about these two worthies, will much oblige 

LENNOX. 

CHRISTOPHER NORTH. In the Memoir of Chris- 
topher North (i. Ill), reference is made to the 
"splendid" examination passed in March, 1807, 
by this very distinguished candidate for a B.A. 
degree. If those eulogies are just, how comes it 
that the name of John Wilson does not appear in 
the Oxford Calendar, as having attained honorary 
distinction ? Honours were awarded then as now. 
Vide Oxford Calendar, 1863, p. 149. F. N. 

NOVA SCOTIA BARONETS Can any correspon- 
dent of " N. & Q." learned in heraldic lore, tell 
me if this dignity has ceased to be conferred, and 
if so, at what date ? The Baronets of Nova Scotia 
were allowed to bear the royal arms on an escut- 
cheon of pretence, while those of Ulster bore the 
badge of the ensanguined hand ; but I hardly 
think that the heraldic distinction between the 
two classes is kept up. Another privilege of the 
Nova Scotia Baronet, I have been informed, is, 
the wearing on state occasions, or when in full 
dress, a broad orange-coloured ribbon.* 

OXONIENSIS. 

O. P. SQUIBS. Is anything known regarding 
the authorship of the two following pieces relating 
to theO. P. affair of 1809? 1. O. P. Victorious, 
8vo, 1809. 2. The Theatric Count, 8vo, 1810. 

R.I. 

HORACE VERNET. In an obituary article on 
the late H. Vernet, in one of your contemporaries! 
last week, two assertions appear, which cannot, 
under any circumstances be both reconciled with 
truth, namely, first: 

" The Emperor was represented at the funeral by 
Marshal Vaillant and an imperial chamberlain, Avho took 
his place at the foot ( ?), by the side of the two young 
Delaroches, the deceased artist's grandsons " 

and secondly, at the close of the article, 

" The artistic-race of the Vernets dies with him. He 

! had no son, and his only daughter, who married Paul 

Delaroche, died childless in 1845. The issue of the 

i , 

[* Articles on Nova Scotia Baronets will be found in 
" X. & Q." lt S. vi. 602 ; vii. 96, and 2 nd S. vii. 342 ; 
but they do not solve the Query proposed bv our Cor- 
| respondent. ED. " K & Q."] 
f Illustrated London News. 



3rd s. 111. FEB. 7, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



113 



union, if a son, was to have perpetuated the two grea 
artists' names as Vernet-Delaroche." 

Which statement, if either, in reference to the 
family history of the distinguished deceased, is 
literally the fact ? Doubtless many of your 
readers can answer with authority. 

JOHN BURTON. 
WEATHER PROPHECY. 

If Christmas Day on Thursday be, 
A windy winter you shall see : 
Windy weather in each week, 
And hard tempests strong and thick. 
The Summer shall be good and dry ; 
Corn and Beasts shall multiply." 
Where are these lines to be found originally ? 
They were read some years since in an old 
magazine. F. 

WEIGHTS or SILVER COINAGE. From a " Table 
for the more Easie Computation of the Value of 
Sterling Silver and Silver Coin by Weight," pub- 
lished in 1696 for general use a copy of which 
is pasted into Fleetwood's Chronicon Preciosum, 
edit. 1745, in the King's Library at the British 
Museum it appears that a halfpenny in silver 
ought to weigh 3f | grs. ; a penny, 7f f grs. ; two- 
pence, 15|f grs. ; threepence, 23 7 \ grs. ; a groat, 
1 dwt. 6f grs. ; sixpence, 1 dwt. 22*. grs. ; a 
shilling, 3 dwts. 20f f grs. ; half-a-crown, 9 dwts. 
16385. grs. ; a crown, 19 dwts. 8f grs. ; ten shil- 
lings, 1 oz. 18 dwts. 17 3\ grs. 

Note, that a grain is the full seventh part of a 
penny ; and in common weighings a fraction, or 
part of a grain, is not worth taking notice of ; 
therefore, you need not take notice of them, as 
they are only added to show the computation is 
xact, and to prevent cavils. 

Query, Whether the above enumeration of 
weights of silver coinage continued for the several 
pieces till 1816? E. 

PHILOLOGICAL QUERY : WIG. In the Saturday 
Review of the 17th Jan. 1863 (pp. 9294), there 
is an article upon the Transactions of the Philo- 
logical Society, 1859-61; and there is a long dis- 
cussion about the etymology of the word wig, 
*' which, although found in Johnson, does not ap- 
pear in Bailey (1745)." Pepys it is stated talks 
of his periwig, which the reviewer considers an 
odd corruption from peruke, but does not profess 
to say where the word ivig is first found ; and 
adds, " we must leave this grave question open." 
Une perrugue is certainly very old in the French 
language : and they have also perruquier, s. masc. ; 
and perruquiere, fern. ; and it is supposed wig is 
a contraction of periwig. I have by me a book 
3i expenses of an ancestor of mine at the begin- 
ning of the eighteenth century, who was a very 
methodical man, and kept a regular register of all 
his disbursements ; and he appears to use wig, or 
periwig, indifferently, so early as that period, as 
the following extracts will show. I give them in 



the orthography of the time, and may observe 
that the prices appear very high, unless perhaps 
the artists were in great estimation. I possess 
the receipts of the two marked with an asterisk. 

" 1711-12, Bespoke, Feby 13, of Mr. Willoughby, a 
Campaigne Wigg, made the 21 March. 

" 1713, Sept r 20. A Wigg of Mr. Barker, att 1 10s. 

*1715, July 28. Mr. Philip Adamson, a light Tye 
Wigg, 5 7*. 6rf. 

" 1716, May 5 th . Bought, a perruque of Mr. Bagnall 
cost me 9. 

" *1718, September 5 th . A light tye Wigg of Barnard 
Koss, at 9. 

" 1720, September 25. Had a light Tye Perriwigg of 
Mr. Ross, att 9 9s. 

" 1724-5, Febry 17. A Tye Wigg, made by Jones, for 
which to pay p r agreement, 8." 

In the Beggar's Opera, which was first per- 
formed January 29, 17f, Peachum, enumerating 
the exploits of Crook-finger'd Jack, says, they 
owe to his industry, among other things, " three 
tie periwigs." p. 

A WOMAN TO BE LET. I am anxious to know 
whether the custom chronicled in the following 
passage from the Annual Register be yet in ex- 
istence. Is not the paragraph a fiction from 
beginning to end ? 

" There is a custom, which most likely is peculiar to a 
small district in the western part of Cumberland. A few 
days ago a gentleman from the neighbourhood of White- 
haven, calling upon a person at his house at Ulpha, was 
informed that he was not within ; he was gone to church ; 
there was a woman to let. On inquiry as to the meaning 
of this singular expression, it was thus explained: 
When any single woman, belonging to the parish, has 
the misfortune to prove with child, a meeting of the 
parishioners is called for the purpose of providing her a 
maintenance in some family, at so much per week, from 
that time to a limited time after her delivery, and this 
meeting (to give it the greater sanction) is uniformly 
holden in the church, where the lowest bidder has the 
bargain ! And on such occasions, previous notice is given 
that on such a day there will be a woman to let" Annual 
Reg. New Series. Pub. by F. C. & J. Eivington, 1806, 
p. 40, second pagination. 

GRIME. 

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER. Can any of your readers 
tell me whether the Spanish letters of St. Francis 
have been translated into English ? Fac-similes 
are given in Steinmetz's History, but I cannot 
see where the originals are to be found. 

WM. DAVIS. 



font!} 

KING OF DENMARK. Is the present King of 
Denmark descended from the son of Christian the 
Seventh and Caroline Matilda of England, or 
rom Christian's half-brother Frederick ? 

What descent, if any, is there from Queen 
Caroline Matilda's daughter ? N. P. 

[The present King of Denmark is not descended from a 
on of Christian the Seventh and Matilda. lie is descended 



114 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3* S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 



from Frederick, half-brother to Christian the Seventh. 
The present King is great-grandson of Christian the 
Seventh through his daughter by Caroline Matilda.] 

JOHN MARCKANT. I have observed in 
"N. & Q." ! S. x. 366, and 3 rd S. i. 374, in- 
quiries are made respecting the author denoted 
by the initial " M." attached to several psalms 
and hymns in the old compilation, known by the 
names of Sternhold and Hopkins. The answer 
offered is that which seems to have first appeared 
in the Censura Literaria, vol. x., and which has 
been adopted by Holland in his Psalmists of 
Britain, the Parker Society, and other parties ; 
viz. that the author in question was John Mard- 
ley. The writer in the Censura, however, offers 
this explanation simply as a conjecture. Mardley 
" turned twenty-four psalms into English odes, 
and made many religious songs ; " and therefore 
he might be the author of those in the old metrical 
psalm-book. It is needless to show that this evi- 
dence is worth little. 

Having had occasion some time ago to examine 
the edition of Sternhold in small folio, 1565, a 
copy of which is in the British Museum, I found 
attached to one of the hymns, which usually bears 
the letter M., the name " Marckant " in full. I 
do not remember whether the full name or the 
initial is used in the other cases ; but there can 
be little doubt that this is the name to which the 
initial refers, as the date is only three years later 
than the first complete edition of these psalms, in 
which, if I mistake not, the particular hymn re- 
ferred to (" the Lamentation ") appeared for the 
first time. In another edition of 1606, I found 
the name changed to " Market." 

Ritson refers to a John Merquaunt author of 
Verses to Divers good Purposes, and there are 
several notices of him in Collier's Extracts from 
the Register of the Company of Stationers. But, 
though I am persuaded that the true name is thus 
brought out, I have not met with any information 
respecting the history of this individual, and shall 
be glad if any of your readers can supply this de- 
ficiency. N. LIVINGSTON. 

Free Church Manse of Stair by 
Coylton, Ayr, N. B. 

[Bale, Script, par. post. p. 106, informs us, that John 
Mardley, not only translated twenty-four of David's 
Psalms into English verse, but wrote also Religious 
Hymns. This statement has led Mr. Haslewood and 
others to conjecture that he was the author of the pieces 
in Sternhold and Hopkins's version, signed with the 
letter M. But it is evident from the discovery 
made by our correspondent, which we have since 
verified, that at least " The Lamentation of a Sinner " 
must be restored to its rightful author, John Marckant. 
This individual is doubtless the John Merquaunt no- 
ticed by Ritson (Bibl. Poet. p. 278), who compiled 
Verses to Diverse good Purposes, licensed to Thomas 
Purfoote, 3rd Nov. 1580. This is all that Ritson knew 
about him or his works. Mr. Collier has three notices of 
him in hia Extracts of the Stationers' Company. 1. A 



ballad entitled " The Purgation of the ryght honourable 
Lord Wentworth, concerning the crime layd to bis 
charge, made the x of Januarie, anno 1558," is subscribe*! 
John Markant (vol. i. p. 22.) 2. " A New Yeres Gift, 
intituled With Spede Retorne to God," made by John 
Markante (vol. i. p. 102) ; and " The Verses compiled by 
John Merquaunt to Diuerse Good Purposes " (vol. ii. p. 
1.28.) Another production attributed to this writer by 
Dr. Bliss is a broadside in St. John's College library, Ox- 
ford, entitled " Of Dice, Wyne, and Wemen. if Im- 
printed at London, in Flete-strete at the signe of the 
Faucon, by Wylliam Gryffith, and are to be solde at his 
shop in S. Dunstan's churchyard, 1571. 

" Pr. Yf musing mindes that do beholde my woe and 

rufull state 
Shall ponder well the sequales here, their musings will 

abate : 
For though that painefull penury doth pyne and pynch 

me now 
Yet was I furnisht once -with wealth as well as some of 

you." 

For the entries of this ballad, see Collier's Registers of the 
Stationers' Company, i. Ill, 115; ii. 69. Markante's 
New Yeares Gift is also noticed by Herbert in his edition 
of Ames, p. 1316.] 

NEVYLL'S " KETTUS." Nevylli, De Fororilm 
Norfolciensium, Ketto Duce, lib. unus, ejusd. Nor- 
vicus. It is stated, I believe by Hearne, that 
two editions of this book were published in 1575, 
and that in one of them there was a passage offen- 
sive to Welshmen. Can any one supply me with 
a correct copy of the passage in question, as well 
as of the statement by Hearne respecting it ? 

LLALLAWG. 

[Kett's rebellion was occasioned by an inclosure in 
1549, and began at an annual play, or spectacle, at Wy- 
mondham, which lasted two days and two nights, accord- 
ing to ancient custom. Nevyll (p. 141) cites part of a 
ballad sung by the rebels, which had a most powerful 
effect in spreading the commotion : 

The country gnoofies, Hob, Dick, and Hick, 

With clubbes and clouted shoon, 
Shall fill up Dussyndale. 
With slaughtered bodies soone." 

The passage displeasing to Welshmen is at pp. 32, 33, of 
which Master Richard Woods has not given a faithful 
translation in his edition of 1623. In Nevyil's Latin it 
reads, "Sedenim Kettiani rati nostros magna pulueris 
sulphurei, caeterarumque rerum omnium (quibus torrnenta 
exerceri sclent) penuria laborare: videntesque insuper 
ad impedimenta et vehicula passim stare ex nostris qnos- 
dam (erant autem Walli) quos turn propter paucitatem 
(nee enim multi erant et incompositi) turn quod de supe- 
riore loco decurrentium impetus sustinere nequaquam 
posse videbantur, magnopere despexerunt ; oblataui sibf 
perinsignem rei bene gerenda3 facultatem existimarunt,' 
&c. Which Woods translates, "But Kett's company 
supposing our men to be greatly distressed for powder, 
and all other necessary furniture for ordnance, perceiving 
also some few to stand straggling with our carriages 
and carts, and not careful for any sudden event of war 
(whom through the rage of the swelling pride of their 
heart being mad) they greatly despised (both because of 
their small company, as also being negligent, and fearing 
no such danger, they supposed they might easily over- 
come) they thought there was offered unto them great 
opportunity of doing some notable exploit. Therefore, 







S. III. FEB. 7, '03.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



115 



while Warwick's soldiers (what for the defence of the 
city, and the number of other weighty business) were 
hindered with great cares, one Miles [Milo], a man (as 
it seemeth) most bold and skilful in discharging of ord- 
nance, watching the time and opportunity of this villany, 
shot thorow the king's master gunner with a bullet; 
whom, when they perceived to be fallen down dead, 
some of them naked and unarmed, some armed with 
staves, bills, and pitchforks, moved as it were with a 
frenzy, made an assault upon our men running down the 
hill, who abode not so much as the first encounter (so 
great was the fear on every side, and force of the enemy 
unlocked for) but astonished and terrified with the dis- 
ordered cries and horrible noise of their feet, as they 
came running down the hill, leaving all the baggage and 
carts, ran away on all sides with great outcries and a swift 
course. A few therefore after this sort put to flight by 
many, the rebels took and carried away into the camp 
certain ordnance which they found there, and carts loaden 
with all things necessary for the wars, before any help of 
our men could come. Which thing was very hurtful unto 
us, and much out of our way." 

We have quoted the whole of the suppressed passage ; 
but after all, at this late day, we are at a loss to discover 
any thing in it personally offensive to the natives of the 
Principality.] 

STEVEDORE. According to Wright's Dictionary, 
" stevedore " is one whose occupation is to stow 
goods, &c. in a ship's hold. Can any of your 
riverside readers furnish the etymology of this 
word ? In Dutch stewen (pronounced steveri) 
means to stow or pack. But whence dore f 

J.K. 

[Stiva, in Italian, ia the hold of a ship, or goods 
stowed in a ship's hull. In Spanish, estiva is stowage, 
the disposition of the several goods contained in a ship's 
bold. In the same language, estivar is to stow, and esti- 
vador is a packer, properly a packer of wool. The ter- 
mination -dor is a modification of the Latin -tor. Thus 
amator, L. in Spanish becomes amador. The Spanish 
and Portuguese -dor, and the Italian -dore, are some- 
times appended to words not apparently of Latin origin.] 

KING STEPHEN'S BREECHES. In a manuscript 
of the reign of Charles II. about the penal laws, 
I find the following sentence : 

"The Deputy Lieftenant y* then had y Rule, had 
beene formerly in military and civil imployment w th y e 
Rebels for many years, and had personally fought at 
Worcester against ye King yt is now ; yet such was his 
care at this present of his maiestyes service, y* he iudged 
all these uncapable of imployment by reason of Religion, 
and w th much ado got a Protestant sent for, who, though 
he was far inferiour to y e rest in all but in honesty, was 
yet receyved for y e better lyke K. Steven's Breeches." 

Can any reader of " N". & Q." inform me of the 
cause that gave celebrity to his majesty's nether 
! garment? A. E. L. 

[The allusion is doubtless to a ballad quoted by Shak- 
speare in Othello, Act II. Sc. 3 : 

" King Stephen was a worthy peer, 

His breeches cost him but a crown, 
He held them sixpence all too dear ; 

With that he call'd the tailor lown." 
To "which Mr. Collier has added the following note : 
'The ballad quoted is to be found entire in Percy's Re- 
lupus, i. 208, ed. 1812. In Camden's Remains is a storv 



respecting the breeches of William Rufus, but there the 
king complained, not that his breeches were 'all too 
dear,' but that they did not cost enough : Camden quotes 
Robert of Gloucester. Steevens refers to a passage in 
Greene's Quip for an Upstart Courtier, 1592, where it is 
said that King Stephen wore a pair of cloth breeches, 
and 'thought them passing costly:' no doubt Shak- 
speare and Greene were obliged to the same ballad au- 
thority."] 

TAISTRIL. In Reed's farce of The Register 
Office, Margery Moorpoot says, " Wad ye be sike 
a taystrel," that is, would you be such a villain, 
" as to ruin me ? " and the word is still used in 
East Yorkshire, pronounced as I have first writ- 
ten it. What is its derivation ? D. 

[Jamieson suggests the following derivation: "TAis- 
TRILL, TYSTRILL, s. a gawkish, dirty thowless sort of 
woman; often applied to a girl who" from carelessness 
tears her clothes. Probably from Dan taasse, a silly man 
or woman, a booby, a looby ; taassed, foolish, simple. If 
the last part of the word is not the mark of a diminutive, 
it may be traced to ryll-er, to roam, to ramble : q. ' one 
who rambles about in an idle and foolish way.' Tastrill is 
understood in a different sense in the North of England, 
being denned bv Grose a cunning rogue.' Taistrell, by 
Marshall, <a rascal,' Yorks."] 



PREDICTION OF ST. VINCENT. 
(3 rd S. ii. 489.) 

In the Sermones de Ternpore et Sanctis S. Vin- 
centii Ferrerii, the inquirer will find a descrip- 
tion of the decline of Christianity ; but not one 
conveying the caricature referred to by your 
correspondent B. H. C., nor even the poetical de- 
lineation of the various epochs of Christianity 
attributed to him in Maxwell's Admirable and 
Notable Prophecies uttered formerly by xxiv fa- 
mous Roman Catholics, concerning the Church of 
Rome's Defection, Tribulation and Reformation, 
Lond. 1615, 4to ; in which, at p. 38, is inserted 
S. Vincent's prophecy : 

" When as thou shalt see the first Bull, &c 

for the sect of devisers and attempters shall cease." 

" The sermons printed in three volumes [3 torn. 2 vols.] 
under his name, cannot be his work, as Dupin and Lappe 
observe; for his name is quoted in them, and they an- 
swer in nothing the character and spirit of this great 

man There ia also a treatise On the End of the 

World,' and on ' Antichrist,' under his name." Butler's 
Lives of the Saints, April 5. 

According to the Biographic Universelle (Fer- 
rier S. Vincent), the first volume of these Ser- 
mones is genuine. The eighth, " De tribus ultimis 
mundi tribulationibus," is perhaps the same as 
the former treatise : whilst the ninth and tenth, 
" De Antichristo," may be the same as the latter, 
although the Saint's name is here quoted (p. 36) : 
" Loquitur de schisrnate, quod tempore B. Vin- 
centii fuit in Ecclesia." In Ser. via., which is as 



114 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. IIL FEB. 7, '63. 



from Frederick, half-brother to Christian the Seventh. 
The present King is great-grandson of Christian the 
Seventh through his daughter by Caroline Matilda.] 

JOHN MARCKANT. I have observed in 
"N. & Q." 1 st S. x. 366,^ and 3 rd S. i. 374, in- 
quiries are made respecting the author denoted 
by the initial " M." attached to several psalms 
and hymns in the old compilation, known by the 
names of Sternhold and Hopkins. The answer 
offered is that which seems to have first appeared 
in the Censura Literaria, vol. x., and which has 
been adopted by Holland in his Psalmists of 
Britain, the Parker Society, and other parties ; 
viz. that the author in question was John Mard- 
ley. The writer in the Censura, however, offers 
this explanation simply as a conjecture. Mardley 
" turned twenty-four psalms into English odes, 
and made many religious songs ; " and therefore 
he might be the author of those in the old metrical 
psalm-book. It is needless to show that this evi- 
dence is worth little. 

Having had occasion some time ago to examine 
the edition of Sternhold in small folio, 1565, a 
copy of which is in the British Museum, I found 
attached to one of the hymns, which usually bears 
the letter M., the name " Marckant " in full. I 
do not remember whether the full name or the 
initial is used in the other cases ; but there can 
be little doubt that this is the name to which the 
initial refers, as the date is only three years later 
than the first complete edition of these psalms, in 
which, if I mistake not, the particular hymn re- 
ferred to (" the Lamentation ") appeared for the 
first time. In another edition of 1606, I found 
the name changed to " Market." 

Kitson refers to a John Merquaunt author of 
Verses to Divers good Purposes, and there are 
several notices of him in Collier's Extracts from 
the Register of the Company of Stationers. But, 
though I am persuaded that the true name is thus 
brought out, I have not met with any information 
respecting the history of this individual, and shall 
be glad if any of your readers can supply this de- 
ficiency. N. LIVINGSTON. 

Free Charch Manse of Stair by 
Coylton, Ayr, N. B. 

[Bale, Script, par. post. p. 106, informs us, that John 
Mardley, not only translated twenty-four of David's 
Psalms into English verse, but wrote also Religious 
Hymns. This statement has led Mr. Haslewood and 
others to conjecture that he was the author of the pieces 
in Sternhold and Hopkins's version, signed with the 
letter M. But it is evident from the discovery 
made by our correspondent, which we have since 
verified, that at least " The Lamentation of a Sinner " 
must be restored to its rightful author, John Marckant. 
This individual is doubtless the John Merquaunt no- 
ticed by Ritson (5iW. Poet. p. 278), who compiled 
Verses to Diverse good Purposes, licensed to Thomas 
Purfoote, 3rd Nov. 1580. This is all that Ritson knew 
about him or his works. Mr. Collier has three notices of 
him in his Extracts of the Stationers' Company. 1. A 



ballad entitled " The Purgation of the ryght honourable 
Lord Wentworth, concerning the crime layd to his 
charge, made the x of Januarie, anno 1558," is subscribed 
John Markant (vol. i. p. 22.) 2. A New Yeres Gift, 
intituled With Spede Retorne to God," made by John 
Markante (vol. i. p. 102) ; and " The Verses compiled by 
John Merquaunt to Diuerse Good Purposes " (vol. ii. p. 
128.) Another production attributed to this writer by 
Dr. Bliss is a broadside in St. John's College library, Ox- 
ford, entitled " Of Dice, Wyne, and Wemen. ^f Im- 
printed at London, in Flete-strete at the signe of the 
Faucon, by Wylliam Gryffitb, and are to be solde at his 
shop in S. Dunstan's churchyard, 1571. 

" Pr. Yf rousing mindes that do beholde my woe and 

rufull state 
Shall ponder well the sequales here, their musings will 

abate : 
For though that painefuli penury doth pyne and pynch 

me now 
Yet was I furnisht once with wealth as well as some of 

you." 

For the entries of this ballad, see Collier's Registers of the 
Stationers' Company, i. Ill, 115; ii. 69. Markante's 
New Yeares Gift is also noticed by Herbert in his edition 
of Ames, p. 1316.] 

NEVYLL'S "KETTUS." Nevylli, De Fororilus 
Norfolciensium, Ketto Duce, lib. unus, ejusd. Nor- 
vicus. It is stated, I believe by Hearne, that 
two editions of this book were published in 1575, 
and that in one of them there was a passage offen- 
sive to Welshmen. Can any one supply me with 
a correct copy of the passage in question, as well 
as of the statement by Hearne respecting it ? 

LLALLAWG. 

[Kett's rebellion was occasioned by an inclosure in 
1549, and began at an annual play, or spectacle, at Wy- 
mondham, which lasted two days and two nights, accord- 
ing to ancient custom. Nevyll (p. 141) cites part of a 
ballad sung by the rebels, which had a most powerful 
effect in spreading the commotion : 

" The country gnooffes, Hob, Dick, and Hick, 

With clubbes and clouted shoon, 
Shall fill up Dussyndale. 
With slaughtered bodies soone." 

The passage displeasing to Welshmen is at pp. 32, 33, of 
which Master Richard Woods has not given a faithful 
translation in his edition of 1623. In jSevyll's Latin it 
reads, "Sedenim Kettiani rati nostros magna pulueris 
sulphurei, caeterarumque rerum omnium (quibus tormenta 
exerceri solent) penuria laborare: videntesque insuper 
ad impedimenta et vehicula passim stare ex nostris qnos- 
dam (erant autem Walli) quos turn propter paucitatem 
(nee enim multi erant et incompositi) turn quod de supe- 
riore loco decurrentium impetus sustinere nequaquam 
posse videbantur, magnopere despexerunt ; oblatarn sibi 
perinsignem rei bene gerendse facultatem existimarunt," 
c. Which Woods translates, "But Kett's company 
supposing our men to be greatly distressed for powder, 
and all other necessary furniture for ordnance, perceiving 
also some few to stand straggling with our carriages 
and carts, and not careful for any sudden event of war 
(whom through the rage of the swelling pride of their 
heart being mad) they greatly despised (both because of 
their small company, as also being negligent, and fearing 
no such danger, they supposed they might easily over- 
come) they thought there was offered unto them great 
opportunity of doing some notable exploit. Therefore, 






S. III. FEB. 7, '63. 'J 



NOTES AND QUEKIES. 



115 



while Warwick's soldiers (what for the defence of the 
city, and the number of other weighty business) were 
hindered with great cares, one Miles [Milo], a man (as 
it seemeth) most bold and skilful in discharging of ord- 
nance, watching the time and opportunity of this villany, 
shot thorow the king's master gunner with a bullet; 
whom, when they perceived to be fallen down dead, 
some of them naked and unarmed, some armed with 
staves, bills, and pitchforks, moved as it were with a 
frenzy, made an assault upon our men running down the 
hill, who abode not so much as the first encounter (so 
great was the fear on every side, and force of the enemj r 
unlocked for) but astonished and terrified with the dis- 
ordered cries and horrible noise of their feet, as they 
came running down the hill, leaving all the baggage and 
carts, ran away on all sides with great outcries and a swift 
course. A few therefore after this sort put to flight by 
many, the rebels took and carried away into the camp 
certain ordnance which they found there, and carts loaden 
with all things necessary for the wars, before any help of 
our men could come. Which thing was very hurtful unto 
us, and much out of our way." 

We have quoted the whole of the suppressed passage ; 
but after all, at this late day, we are at a loss to discover 
any thing in it personally offensive to the natives of the 
Principality.] 

STEVEDORE. According to Wright's Dictionary, 
" stevedore " is one whose occupation is to stow 
goods, &c. in a ship's hold. Can any of your 
riverside readers furnish the etymology of this 
word ? In Dutch stewen (pronounced steven) 
means to stow or pack. But whence dore ? 

J.K. 

[Stiva, in Italian, is the hold of a ship, or goods 
stowed in a ship's hull. In Spanish, estiva is stowage, 
the disposition of the several goods contained in a ship's 
hold. In the same language, estivar is to stow, and esti- 
vador is a packer, properly a packer of wool. The ter- 
mination -dor is a modification of the Latin -tor. Thus 
amator, L. in Spanish becomes amador. The Spanish 
and Portuguese -dor, and the Italian -dore, are some- 
times appended to words not apparently of Latin origin.] 

KING STEPHEN'S BREECHES. In a manuscript 
of the reign of Charles II. about the penal laws, 
I find the following sentence : 

"The Deputy Lieftenant y* then had y Rule, had 
beene formerly in military and civil imployment w th y e 
Rebels for many years, and had personally fought at 
Worcester against y e King y l is now ; yet such was his 
care at this present of his maiestyes service, y* he iudged 
all these uncapable of imployment by reason of Religion, 
and w th much ado got a Protestant sent for, who, though 
ae was far inferiour to y e rest in all but in honesty, was 
yet receyved for y e better lyke K. Steven's Breeches." 

Can any reader of " N. & Q." inform me of the 
cause that gave celebrity to his majesty's nether 
garment? A. E. L. 

[The allusion is doubtless to a ballad quoted by Shak- 
speare in Othello, Act II. Sc. 3 : 

" King Stephen was a worthy peer, 

His breeches cost him but a crown, 
He held them sixpence all too dear ; 

With that he call'd the tailor lown." 
To "which Mr. Collier has added the following note: 
ine ballad quoted is to be found entire in Percy's Re- 
'yues, i. 208, ed. 1812. In Camden's Remains is a storv 



respecting the breeches of William Rufus, but there the 
king complained, not that his breeches were 'all too 
dear,' but that they did not cost enough : Camden quotes 
Robert of Gloucester. Steevens refers to a passage in 
Greene's Quip for an Upstart Courtier, 1592, where it is 
said that King Stephen wore a pair of cloth breeches, 
and 'thought them passing costly:' no doubt Shak- 
speare and Greene were obliged to the same ballad au- 
thority."] 

TAISTRII,. In Reed's farce of The Register 
Office, Margery Moorpoot says, " Wad ye be sike 
a taystrel," that is, would you be such a villain, 
" as to ruin me ? " and the word is still used in 
East Yorkshire, pronounced as I have first writ- 
ten it. What is its derivation ? D. 

[Jamieson suggests the following derivation: "TAis- 
TRILL, TYSTRILL, s. a gawkish, dirty thowless sort of 
woman; often applied to a girl who from carelessness 
tears her clothes. Probably from Dan taasse, a silly man 
or woman, a booby, a looby ; taassed, foolish, simple. If 
the last part of the word is not the mark of a diminutive, 
it may be traced to ryll-er, to roam, to ramble : q. ' one 
who rambles about in an idle and foolish way.' Tastrill is 
understood in a different sense in the North of England, 
being defined by Grose ' a cunning rogue.' Taistrell, by 
Marshall, ' a rascal,' Yorks."] 



PREDICTION OF ST. VINCENT. 
(3 rd S. ii. 489.) 

In ; the Sermones de Tempore et Sanctis S. Vin- 
centii Ferrerii, the inquirer will find a descrip- 
tion of the decline of Christianity ; but not one 
conveying the caricature referred to by your 
correspondent B. H. C., nor even the poetical de- 
lineation of the various epochs of Christianity 
attributed to him in Maxwell's Admirable and 
Notable Prophecies uttered formerly by xxiv fa- 
mous Roman Catholics, concerning the Church of 
Rome's Defection, Tribulation and Reformation, 
Lond. 1615, 4to ; in which, at p. 38, is inserted 
S. Vincent's prophecy : 

' When as thou shalt see the first Bull, &c 

for the sect of devisers and attempters shall cease." 

" The sermons printed in three volumes [3 torn. 2 vols.] 
under his name, cannot be his work, as Dupin and Lappe 
observe ; for his name is quoted in them, and they an- 
swer in nothing the character and spirit of this great 

man There is also a treatise ' On the End of the 

World,' and on 'Antichrist,' under his name." Butler's 
Lives of the Saints, April 5. 

According to the Biographic Universelle (Fer- 
rier S. Vincent), the first volume of these Ser- 
mones is genuine. The eighth, " De tribus ultimis 
mundi tribulationibus," is perhaps the same as 
the former treatise : whilst the ninth and tenth, 

' De Antichristo," may be the same as the latter, 
although the Saint's name is here quoted (p. 36) : 

' Loquitur de schismate, quod tempore B. Vin- 
centii fuit in Ecclesia." In Ser. viii., which is as 



116 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



HI. FEB. 7, '63. 



well historical or retrospective as prophetical, he 
thus describes the destruction of the Church : 

" Fuit minuta quia nescierunt conservare quod sancti 
Apostoli lucrati fuerant. Primo fuit minuta per totam 
Indiam per ilium qui dicitur Presbyter Joannes. Se- 
cundo in regno Assyriorum per unum tyrannum. Tertio 
in regno Africanorum per Machometum. Quarto Grae- 
corum cum Imperatore Constantino. Quinto Armenorum 
cum eorum rege. Sexto Georgianorum cum quodam 
pseudo-propheta. Septimo per Arrianorum docuraenta 
cum quodam haeresiarcha. Octavo Italicorum cum 
Bartholomaeo Barensi. Nono fuere seducti Galli cum 
Petro de Candia." 

He then describes the " miracles of falsehood " 
performed by Antichrist the conflagration of the 
world, and the final judgment: 

"Mortuo Antichristo a fnlgure in monte Oliveti, et 
divulgata ejus morte per mundum, mundus iste solum 
durabit 45 diebus. Non dico annis, sed 45 diebus, ut clare 
invenitur Dan. xii." 

" The ancients, reasoning from Dan. xii. 11, supposed 
that the interval between the destruction of Antichrist, 
and the general Judgment . . . would be forty -five days 
only." 

Dr. Todd's Lectures on the Apocalypse (p. 213), 
who quotes St. Jerome and Malvenda De Anti- 
christo, as thus expounding the passage, and re- 
marks, 

" It deserves the serious consideration of the reader, 
whether this exposition, which is in strict accordance 
with the letter of the prophecy, and was once almost 
universally received in the Church, is not, on the whole, 
more worthy of our adoption than the laboured and un- 
satisfying conjectures of our modern controversial com- 
mentators." P. 214. 

" Cum sero autem factum est dixit Dominus vineae 
procurator! suo. Sero intelligitur dies judicii : sicut enim 
sero est finis diei, sic dies judicii erit in fine mundi cito 
et breviter." Vincentii Serm. xlii., vol. i. p. 131. 

I have again exposed myself to the censure of 
SEXAGENARIUS (2 nd S. xii. 258) : for, referring to 
Muratori's Antiquitates Italicce Medii JEvi, I un- 
wittingly wrote "Mabillon" (3 rd S. ii. 183.) 

BlBLIOTHECAR. CHETHAM. 



THE COMPLUTENSIAN POLYGLOT. 
(3 rd S. iii. 21.) 

I am much obliged to your correspondent 
K. P. D. E. for a copy in " N. & Q." of the 
letter of Dr. Geddes, which originally appeared 
in the Gentleman's Magazine. It would be in- 
teresting to know if Dr. Geddes's friend the 
Canon of the Canaries ever sent him a colla- 
tion of the Latin Manuscripts of the ninth cen- 
tury, which he found in the Library at Alcala. 

Ximenes mentions, in his Preface to the New 
Testament, that the manuscripts which he had 
received and purchased in various quarters, be- 
sides those which were lent to him by Leo X., 



were very ancient. These are the words of the 
Cardinal : 

"Illud lectorem non lateat, non quscvis exemplaria 
impressioni huic Archetypa fuisse, sed antiquissima 
emendatissimaque, ac tantse przeterea vetustatis, ut fidem 
eis abrogare nefas videatur," &c. 

Dr. Hefele speaks of a manuscript, which was 
sent to Ximenes by the Republic of Venice, 
which seems to have been a copy of a Codex that 
belonged to Cardinal Bessarion. Mention is also 
made of some very ancient Latin manuscripts, 
written in Gothic characters, which were made 
use of for the edition of the Vulgate : 

" Nicht weniger," says Dr. Hefele, s. 118, " werden 
hier sehr alte lateinische Handschriften mit gothischen 
Buchstaben erwShnt, die fur den Druck der Vulgata 
beniitzt worden seien." 

Lopez de Stunica also (otherwise called Zuniga 
or Astuniga), in his Itinerarium, mentions that a 
" Codex Rhodiensis " (spoken of by Griesbach 
under No. 52, in his Kritik aus des N. Test+ 
2 Band. s. 8), was made use of, for the Greek 
text of the New Testament. 

Gomez testifies that seven Hebrew manuscripts 
alone, cost Ximenes no less a sum than 4,000 
ducats ; and that the total expense of the Poly- 
glot amounted to 50,000 ducats ! These are his 
words, which are well worth recording, not only 
because the testimony is venerable and trust- 
worthy, but above all, because they exhibit the 
literary and munificent character of the great 
Spanish Cardinal, in so extraordinary a manner : 

" At illud unum quod ad impensas a Ximenes in ea re 
absolvenda factas pertinet, reticendnm nequaqua est. 
Septe hebraea Exeplaria quas nunc Copluti habentur, 
quatuor millibus aureoru. ex diversis regionibus sibi com- 
parasse, Alphonsus Zamora hebraeorum literarum Pro- 
fessor, saepe numero referebat Jam vero Chalca- 

graphoru et Scribarum salaria ; doctorum hominum non 
vulgaria praemia ; mercedes internuntiis propositas, qui<- 
bus ad Codices yetustos adipiscedos utebatur ; assiduam 
denique subministrantium Catervam, quam ad res quae 
insperatb emergebant expediendas sustentabat ; et mille 
alia, quae longum esset referre, si bene quis ratione sub- 
ducta numeret, quinquaginta millium Aureorum et am- 
plius summam conficiet ; quod et majores natu fre- 
quenter dicere audivi." De Rebus gestis Francisci 
Ximenii, fol. 38. (Ed. Compluti, 1569.) 

To what an immense sum would 50,000 ducats 
now amount ! The sale price of the Polyglot bore 
no proportion to the expense of publication. 
Ximenes had only 600 copies taken off, while 
each copy, though consisting of six folios, cost no 
more than six ducats and a half. Whatever 
profit may have arisen (if any) was intended by 
the Cardinal, in his will, to be devoted to charit- 
able purposes. Perfect copies of the Polyglot 
are scarce, even in Spain. There is a magnificent 
one on vellum in Madrid/ brought from Alcala, 
when its once-renowned University was sup- 
pressed. The " Hebrew-Chaldaic Lexicon " is 
often wanting in many copies. The editors com- 



3rd S. III. FEB. 7, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



117 



menced their labours in the year 1502, and not in 
1505, as Schrock and others suppose. It was 
not till 1514 that the first volume containing 
the New Testament, appeared. When the last 
sheets were brought to the Cardinal by John, the 
son of William Brocar (the last volume was not 
finished till July, 1517, when Ximenes was on 
the verge of the grave), his Eminence said : "I 
give Thee thanks, O Lord ! that Thou hast enabled 
me to bring to the desired end, the great work 
which I undertook." Then turning to those 
around him, he said : " Amongst the many ar- 
duous duties which I have performed for the 
benefit of my country, there is nothing, my 
friends, on which you ought to congratulate me 
more than on the completion of this edition of 
the Bible, which now opens to us the sacred 
fountains of religion, when they are most needed," 
& c . Gomez, folio 38. 

Well might the Cardinal feel an honest pride, 
in having lived to behold the completion of so 
magnificent a work, a noble monument of his 
learning, piety, zeal, and munificence ; and whose 
example, too, was the means of afterwards giving 
to the world the Antwerp, Paris, and London 
Polyglots. 

I may add, that though- the last volume was 
finished in 1517, the publication was delayed till 
1520, when Leo X. addressed a brief to Francisco 
de Mendoza, Archdeacon of Cordova, authorising 
the sale of the work : the same was sent to the 
Bishop of Avila. The death of Ximenes in 1517, 
seems to have been the sole reason why the ap- 
probation of Leo X. was not solicited at the time. 
His holiness expedited the brief, which authorized 
the publication, proprio motu. 

The best critical account of the Polyglot is 
certainly that given by Dr. Hefele, in his most 
interesting Life of Ximenes. (Tubingen, 1851. 
12 Hauptstiick, S. 113.) A good account also 
appears in Le Long's Sibliotheca Sacra (ed. 
Marsh, pp. 332339). 

Spanish writers now generally spell the name 
of the Cardinal thus, Ximenez ; but the most 
correct orthography is Jimenez. His name in 
full is, El Cardenal Don Fray Francisco Jimenez 
de Cisneros. Cisneros, from which his family 
originally came, is about six leagues north-west 
of Palencia, in the kingdom of Leon. The Car- 
dinal was born in Torrelaguna, in the diocese of 
Toledo, a few leagues from Madrid. 

Since my note respecting the printer of the 
Polyglot (named Brocar) appeared in " N. & Q." 
3 rd S. iii. 21,1 have been enabled to consult two 
Spanish writers of considerable authority on the 
question, Whether or not the family of the Brocars 
were of German origin ? One is, Senor Vicente 
de la Fuente, who published in 1855 a valuable 
work entitled Historia Ecclesiastica de Espaiia, 
in 3 vols. (Barcelona) ; and the other is one of 



the biographers of Ximenes, named Padre Quin- 
tanilla, whose work appeared at Palermo in 1633, 
with this title, Archetypo de Virtudes, Espejo de 
Prelados, el Venerable Padre y Siervo de Dios, 
Fray Francisco Ximenez de Cisneros. 

Both these writers expressly mention that 
Brocar was a German printer, and therefore 
neither of Spanish nor Italian origin. " Fue 
traido," says Quintanilla, " de las partes de Ale- 
mania Arnaldo Guillermo Brocar, el primer im- 
presor de la Universidad de Atcala," &c. 

Vicente de la Fuente says, speaking of Ximenes : 
" A sus expensas trajo a Toledo un impresor ale- 
man llamado Arnaldo Guillermo Brocar," &c. 

These two authorities, I think, settle the ques- 
tion respecting the country of the Castilian 
printers. JOHN DAI/TON. 

Norwich. 



CHRISTMAS CUSTOM AT ACKWORTH, YORKSHIRE 
(3 rd S. ii. 505.) Knowing well the village of 
Ackworth, I have made several inquiries on the 
spot respecting the custom of suspending a wheat- 
sheaf outside the church porch. From the answers 
I have received I conclude that the custom men- 
tioned has been discontinued many years, inas- 
much as the oldest inhabitants never saw the 
sheaf, nor even ever heard of the custom. Per- 
haps your correspondent W. P. L. will favour me 
with his authority for the existence of the above- 
stated custom. THOMAS H. CROMEK. 

Wakefield. 

CECIL HOUSE AND EXETER CHANGE (3 rd S. iii. 
81.) T. C.N. is wrong in describing the site for 
the Strand Music Hall as that of the mansion of 
the Cecil family and the first Exeter Change. 
The Lyceum Theatre, after the fire in 1830, was 
built on that site. The eastern entrance to the 
Arcade, where Clarke amassed his wealth, was at 
the spot now known as the pit entrance to the 
Lyceum, and extended to Burleigh Street. The 
Exeter Arcade, now removed for the Music Hall, 
occupied a portion of the space left vacant by the 
destruction of the old English Opera House. 

JOHN LIMBIRD. 

T. C. N". is in error in supposing that the 
modern structure called Exeter Change, between 
Wellington and Catherine Streets, Strand, is on 
the site of the old edifice so named. Old Exeter 
Change, with its south front abutting into the 
road, lay more to the west, near Burlington Street, 
as many of us may remember. It was not erected 
in the reign of William and Mary, but in that of 
James the Second ; and it was Gay, and not Gray, 
the poet, who lay in state in the upper room. 
These are slips, and perhaps misprints, worth cor- 
recting. J- DORAN. 



118 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'* S. III. FEE. 7, '63. 



CHARLES CATTON, R.A. (3 rd S. iii. 68.) At the 
Society of the Artists of Great Britain, the radix 
of our Royal Academy, springing out of the So- 
ciety for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufac- 
tures, and Commerce, Mr. Catton exhibited, in 
1760, a Landscape and Cattle ; two small Pictures 
of Cattle ; Abel Drugger (a portrait, no doubt) ; 
and two ornamental Coach Panels. In 1761, a 
Scene in Shakspeare's Tempest ; and an Emblem- 
atical Picture of Reason. In 1762, a Piece of 
Lions; and a Piece of Cattle. In 1763, the Death 
of Adonis ; and Portrait of a Gentleman on Horse- 
back. In 1764, a Lion and Lioness (No. 12) ; a 
Coach Panel (No. 13) ; and a Horse and Dog 
(No. 14). In 1766, Mr. Catton, Gate Street, 
Lincoln's Inn Fields ; and Bar-Gate Entrance to 
Southampton. Subsequently his talents are en- 
listed in the interests of the Royal Academy, when 
he is (for good services to art, of course,) dubbed 
one of the Forty. At the opening of the Royal 
Academy in 1769, Mr. Catton has Tigers Repos- 
ing. In the following year he does not show ; but 
in 1771 he gives a work entitled the Filling up of 
Rosamond's Pond, resulting, it was said, from the 
increasing number of suicides of the day ; at any 
rate the period of this work is thus intimated. 

I cannot at this moment say, what may be 
gleaned from the biographers regarding these fore- 
fathers of Fine Art, but am glad to assist in de- 
monstrating the versatile genius by which the 
pencil of the English coach painter was guided, 
while the Italian coach painter Cipriani's (whose 
panel-painting may be seen on the state-coach to 
this day) was the hand to keep Bartolozzi in full 
work upon those amusing and elegant designs of 
various " genera," including what among collectors 
have flourished as Bartolozzi's tickets. Would we 
had such ticketings in these days ! OBSOLETE. 

JUNIUS (3 rd S. iii. 67.) The secret of the 
authorship of the Letters of Junius has been kept 
till it has lost its value ; very few, compared with 
the number some fifty or sixty years ago, are those 
who have much curiosity on the subject ; and still 
fewer those who take an interest in it. No one 
capable of examining evidence, and without a 
Whig bias (perversity, I should call it), has a 
particle of faith in Macaulay and Sir Philip 
Francis. The question is hardly worth agitating 
at this time of day, when literary men have so 
many strong claims on their time and attention, 
and I write only to point out, to the very curious 
few, a clue which, if followed up, might possibly 
lead to the discovery of old Stat nominis umbra. 

In Records ofmyLife t \)j John Taylor, the fol- 
lowing passage occurs : 

" Home Tooke told me, that he knew who was the 
author of the Junius's Letters, but that he had become 
acquainted with him under circumstances which would 
have made it treacherous on his part to make the writer 
known." 



Mr. Taylor was both an able and a veracious 
writer ; and, taking his statement to be true, as I 
doubt not it was, the representatives of Home 
Tooke might yet discover, among his papers, satis- 
factory evidence of the truth of what he told to 
Mr. Taylor. If the true Junius should thus be 
found, surely no good reason now exists for con- 
cealing him ; the mask, so long worn, may now be 
dropped the shadow be allowed to retire before 
a ray of truth. J. C. H. 

Guildford. 

SOMERSETSHIRE WILLS : HORNER (3 rd S. ii. 501.) 
Mr. Thomas Homer, mentioned in the will of 
Margaret Jorden, was probably the second son of 
John Homer, steward of Glastonbury Abbey. He 
lived at Cloford, in the immediate neighbourhood 
of Frome. From his elder brother, John Horner, 
descended the family now of Mells Park. 

C. J. R. 

SAMUEL ROWE (3 rd S. iii. 74.) The family to 
which INA refers probably sprung from the Rowes 
of Devon, who, in a pedigree entered at the visit- 
ation of 1620, claimed descent from the Rowes of 
Kent. The pedigree begins with Richard Rowe 
of Kent, temp. Edward III., who married the 
daughter and heir of Philip Rurd of Devon, 
and thereupon settled in the latter county. The 
arms given are those of the Kentish family quarter- 
ing, I think, a chevron between 3 lambs, for Rurd. 

I trust INA will continue his valuable contribu- 
tions to Somersetshire history. It is to be re- 
gretted that there are not more labourers in the 
same wide and almost unexplored field. 

C. J. R, ' 

PRETERNATURAL DAY RECORDED IN THE 
CHINESE CHRONICLES (3 rd S. ill 48.) Martini, 
the Jesuit Missionary in China, in one of his 
works published about two centuries ago, entitled 
Sinica Histories Decas prima a gentis origine ad 
Christum natum (lib. i. p. 37), says, in reference 
to the reign of the Chinese Emperor, Yao, " Per 
hec tempora diebus decem non occidisse solem, 
orbemque conflagraturum mortales tirnuisse scri- 
bunt." Shuckford, in his Sacred and Profane 
History of the World connected, shows that the 
reign of Yao synchronises with the date of 
Joshua's miracle, as does also the age of Phaeton, 
whose adventure with the chariot of the sun, when 
stripped of its mythical guise, is an evident remi- 
niscence, he argues, of the same event. The pas- 
sage occurs in vol. iii. b. xii. pp. 451 467, ed. 
1737. EDW. WILTON. 

Doncaster. 

THOMAS CLENDON (3 rd S. ii. 78) was matricu- 
lated as a sizar of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, , 
April 8, 1620 ; proceeded B.A. 1623-4, and coin- j 
menced M.A. 1627. On Sept. 17, 1667, he was | 
instituted to the rectory of Radwinter, Essex, 
which he held till his death in 1667. He pub- 




S rd 



EB.7,'G3.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



119 



lished Justification Justified in a sermon preached 
Dec. 11, 1652, on Rom. v. 1. Lond. 4to, 1653. 
C. H. & THOMPSON COOPER. 

CUCKOO- GUN ; PEMBROKESHIRE RHYME (3 rd S. 
iii. 4.) Mr. Halliwell gives (on the authority of 
MS. Harl. 1962, of the seventeenth century) a 
rather different version of the lines quoted by 
MR. TOMBS : 

"As I went over Hottery Tottery, 

I looked into Harbora Lilly : 

I spied a cutterell, 

Playing with her cambril. 

I cryed, Ho, neighbour, ho ! 

Lend me your cue and your goe 

To shoot at yonder cutterell 

Playing with her cambril, 

And you shall have the curie of her loe." 
Popular Rhymes and Nursery Tales, 1849, p. 150. 

It will be noticed that in this version the words 
" cuckoo " and " pelloo," both of which I look 
upon as very doubtful (particularly the French 
derivation of the latter), disappear. Mr. Halli- 
well's note is, " A man calling to his neighbour 
for a gun to shoot a deer, and he should have her 
humbles."'' JOB J. BARDWELL WORKARD, M.A. 

WINE (3 rd S. iii. 90.) Henderson's History of 
Wines (Baldwin and Cradock, London, 1824), 
probably contains a good deal bearing upon these 
queries, but I do not think it refers directly to the 
scriptural and ecclesiastical points. 

LYTTELTON. 

CALLIS (3 rd S. iii. 58.) There are no deeds 
known to be extant referring to the foundation 
of the Callis or bedehouse at Stamford. 

STAMFORDIENSIS. 



NOTES ON BOOKS, ETC. 

The Life of William Warburton, D.D., Lord Bishop of 
Gloucester, from 1760 to 1779. With Remarks on his 
Works. By the Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A., &c. 
Longman & Co. 

As Mr. Watson justly remarks, the number of eminent 
persons with whom Warburtou was brought into contact, 
and the scornful defiance with which he answered all that 
opposed him, render his life a career that cannot be 
mrveyed without interest. The story of this literary 
Sladiator is well and pleasantly told" by Mr. Watson, 
who, while as in duty bound he makes the figure of 
;' great Gloster " the most prominent of the picture, gives 
interest and variety to it by the many other portraits 
with which he fills his canvas, and which he sketches in 
as accessaries ; and we must do him the justice to sav 
that he uses his pencil with great liberality, and does not 
seek to throw into shade the characters or abilities of 
Warburton's associates or opponents for the purpose of 
bringing out in brilliant contrast the character and abilities 
of Warburton himself. The manner in which Mr. Wat- 
son upholds Theobald as a commentator on Shakspeare 
is a striking instance of this. For Theobald has never yet 
nad full justice done, either to his learning or his judg- 



ment. We think, had the feeling of dislike to Wilkes, 
by which Mr. Watson is obviously influenced, not been 
so strong, he would not have repeated the charge of his 
being the author of the infamous poem, printed at his 
private press, which must now in our opinion unques- 
tionably be attributed to Potter. The book abounds with 
literary information, and is altogether a most pleasant 
addition to our biographical stores. 

Les Matinees Royales, ou UArt de Regner. Opuscule 
inedit de Frederic II., dil le Grand, Roi de Prusse. (Wil- 
liams & Norgate.) 

Royal autobiographies abound just now. But a few 
months since, and we had one of Charles V. ; and now 
we are presented with one from the pen of the great 
Frederic, printed from a copy taken at Sans Souci in 
1806 by the Baron de Me'neval. The proofs of the au- 
thenticity of this latter which has been attacked by 
Ranke and other German men of letters are to be sought 
for in the Home and Foreign Review, No. III. 

Routledge's Illustrated Natural History. By the Rev. 
J. G. Wood, M.A., F.L.S., &c. Part XLV11L (Rout- 
ledge, Warne, & Routledge.) 

We have, in this double number of Routledge's Illus- 
trated Natural History, the conclusion of a work which 
is probably destined to occupy the place in public favour 
which was for so many years enjoyed by Goldsmith's 
well known work. The book before us has, however, 
higher claims to such favour in the scientific knowledge 
of the editor and the skill of the artists ; and we con- 
gratulate Mr. Wood on the successful completion of a 
popular Natural History, which does credit to all con- 
cerned in its production. 

Such of our readers as are interested in genealogical 
studies may be glad to know, on the authority of La 
Correspondance Littfraire, that the most complete lists of 
the nobles of France and England who fought at Poic- 
tiers and Agincourt, which have ever been given to the 
world, will be found in M. Ren6 de Belleval's recently 
published volume, entitled La Grande Guerre; Fragments, 
d'une Histoire de France aux xiv me et xv me siecles. 



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C. E. Stuart. 8vo. Edinburgh, 1847. 
THE DECLINE OF THE LAST STOARTS. Roxburgh Club, 1843. 

Wanted by Mr. Smith, 20, Wellington Street Strand, W.C. 

POSTULATES AND DATA. No. XXI., &c. 

CHCRCH MISSIONARY INTELLIGENCER. Vol. II. 

THE CHRISTIAN ANNOTATOR. Vol. II. 

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LODGE'S HIBERNIA CCRIOSA. Vol. I. 

PROCEEDINGS op THE ROYAL IRISH ACADEMT. Vol. II. 

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ER?K'S REPERTORY OP THE ENROLMENTS ON THE PATENT ROLLS OP 

CHANCERY, IN IRELAND. Vol. I. Part II. 

CROPTON CHOKER'S HISTORICAL ILLOSTUATIONS OP KILMALLOCE. 
THE KERRY MAGAZINE. Vol. III. 
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MEYRICK'S HISTORY OP GLAMORGANSHIRE IN 1578. Printed by Sir 
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120 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



III. FEB. 7, '63. 



ARMT LIST for March, April, May, and October, 1862. Parker. 
Wanted by Messrs. Henningham $ Hullis, 5, Mount Street, W. 



COMMON-PLACE BOOK OF EPIGRAMS. By Davenport, 1825. 
Wanted by Mr. I. J. Reeve, Newhaven, Sussex. 



to 

Among other Papers which are in type, and to which we Jtope to give 
insertion next week, are Lord Thurlow, Registers of the Stationers' 
Company, Translation of Remains of Cardinal Ximenes, Coustitu- 
tiones Clementinas, 4-c. 

G. A. C. Where can we address a letter to this Correspondent, whose 
communication respecting Refugees appears, ante p. 86? 

JAY DEE. Not received. 

H. M. (Herts.) The lines occur in a poem {by Dr. Watts, entitled 
" False Greatness," in his Horse Lyricae. 

ST. Liz. Our authority for the, statement (arrte p. 71 ) that Mr. Collet 
was pastor of a metting-house at Coat, was Joseph Stennetfs Funeral 
Sermon for him. Stennett, we believe, was connected with the Baptist 
denomination. 

A GENERAL READER. On Pantomimes at Christmas, consult our 2nd 
S.i. 313, 436, 501. 

G. A. B. In 1790 there was published Memoirs of George Barrlngton, 
the noted Pickpocket, with a plate of his detection at Covent Garden 
Theatre, picking the pocket of Prince Orlow of a snuff-box worth 
30,0001. 

ABHBA will find a long list of the works of Dietrich-Hermann Hege- 
wisch in the Nouvelle Biographic ~ ' 
English translation of h 
1806. 



ographic Ge'ne'rale, xxiii. 762. There is no 
is Uebersicht der Irlandischen Geschichte, 



E R RATUM._3rd S. iii. p. 98, col. i. line 1, for " Nowkeldhead " read 
" Howkeldhead." 

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3'd S. III. FEB. 14, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



121 



LONDON, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1863. 



CONTENTS. NO. 59. 

NOTES : Lord Thurlow, 121 Notes and Queries on 
"Joseph Andrews," 122 " Constitutions Clementinas," 
123 Shakspeare, Sidney, and Essex, Letter III., 124 
Translation of the Remains of Cardinal Ximenez, to a 
New Monument, in the " Iglesia Magistral," at Alcal de 
Heriares, in the Year 1857, 126 Valentine Notes, 128. 

MIK" OK NOTES: Fitzgibbon Monument Eikon Basilike 

Pope's Willow History of Briggs's Logarithms Sir 
Thomas Gresham Castle William, Boston Cheshire 

Proverb, 128. 

QUERIES : As to c, ch, and k Motto and Device of the 
University of Cambridge Calvert, Author of the " His- 
tory of Knarcsborough " A French Tract translated 
by Wake Gibson, Roxburghshire Heraldic Hodge 
of Gladsmuir, near Edinburgh, 1710 Lambton Family : 
" The Times " Newspaper of 1828 Leith Family Mail- 
lard: Sermones Old China Richard, King of the 
Romans Saxia, or Sassia, in Rome Rev. Charles Swan 
" Sunday, a Poem " Soda Water Portrait of Segneri 
" Tu es Gustos " Third after Epiphany, 1863 University 
Registers Zuccarelli and Wilson, 129. 

QUERIES WITH ANSWEBS : William Dorrington William 
Tyndale Con-temporary "Chronicles of Cartaphilus" 

English Synonyms Rev. Thomas Westley, 132. 
REPLIES: Ancient Land Tenures, 134 Hackney, Ib. 

Palmerin of England, 136 " Home and Foreign Review" 

The Canons of 1640 Arthur O'Connor Rats' Bones in 
Sepulchres The English Ape, 1588 Ritchie of Prestoun 

Rood Coat The Wyndhams Quotation Wanted 
Laud Cade Mock Suns Deflection of Chancels 
Titles of Mayors Oil Wells near Edinburgh Miles 
Mosse Portlanders Dr. John Hall, Bishop of Bristol 
136. 

Notes on Books, &c. 



LORD THURLOW. 

No step in the career of a man who, born in a 
humble Norfolk parsonage, by the force of his 
own talents fought his way up to the highest 
office in the State, can be undeserving of atten- 
tion ; and that Warburton of the Woolsack, Lord 
Chancellor Thurlow, certainly forms no exception 
to the law which makes us study with interest 
the rise of one who, whatever may have been his 
faults, was a man of vigorous intellect and power- 
ful influence. What a compliment did Johnson pay 
to his conversational and argumentative powers, 
when he said of him, " I would prepare myself for 
no man in England but Lord Thurlow. When I 
am to meet with him I should wish to know a day 
before." 

If we accept the authority of Lord Campbell, 
Thurlow, though he did not owe his political ad- 
vancement to the powerful speech which he made 
at the Bar of the House of Lords in the memor- 
able Douglas Cause, owed it to the influence 
of the Duchess of Queensberry, the friend of 
Gay, Pope, and Swift, and whose acquaintance 
he had made while engaged in the preparation of 
the case which was laid before the House, and 
which Lord Campbell pronounces " a model of 
lucid arrangement and forcible reasoning." Lord 
Campbell is probably correct in saying that the 
appeal was drawn by Thurlow ; but, if so, it is 



certainly strange that he should not have signed 
it. The standing orders of the House of Lords 
require that appeals should be signed either by 
such as have been counsel in the cause in the 
Court below, or shall attend as counsel when the 
cause is heard ; and this appeal is accordingly 
signed by Montgomery, who argued it in the Court 
of Session in Scotland, and by Fletcher Norton, 
who was to argue at the bar of the House. 

But what Lord Campbell had previously said 
of the statement that Thurlow " made his for- 
tune by the great speech he made at the Bar of 
the House of Lords in the Douglas Cause," 
namely, " this story is utterly demolished by the 
slightest attention to dates," applies with equal 
force to the statement that he got his Silk Gown 
in Dec. 1761, or Hilary Term 1762, by the in- 
fluence of the Duchess of Queensberry from his 
connection with that cause. 

For what are the facts ? The Duke of Douglas 
died in 1761, and the litigation arising out of his 
devising his estates to Archibald Stewart Doug- 
las, his nephew, and revoking the prior deed of 
settlement in favour of the family of Hamilton, 
did not commence till December, 1762. The 
cause was long contested in the Scotch Courts 
until judgment was given in favour of the house 
of Hamilton on the 12th July, 1767. 

On the following 15th Nov. 1767, an Appeal 
against this decision was lodged in the House of 
Lords ; the cause came on for hearing in January 
1769, and judgment was eventually given in favour 
of Douglas on the 27th February in that year. 

Now as Thurlow got his silk gown in Dec. 
1761, or January 1762, and took his seat in Par- 
liament on 10th May, 1768, the reason of his 
getting the former must be sought for in some 
earlier action of his life. 

The reader will doubtless remember that Mr. 
Simons, of the British Museum, republished, some 
years since, a Pamphlet * which in his opinion and 
that of some of his " friends " bore a close re- 
semblance to the style and composition of Junius. 
How far Mr. Simons and his friends are right is. 
not now the question ; but having alluded to it, I 
must in passing confess that I do not see any re- 
semblance between the pamphlet and the Letters 
of Junius. 

The Pamphlet is entitled " A Letter to an 
Honorable Brigadier General Commander -in- 
Chief of His Majesty' s Forces in Canada. Lon- 
don, printed for J. Burd, opposite St. Dunstan's 



* Junius. ' A Letter to an Honourable Brigadier- 
General Commander -in- Chief of His Majesty's Forces in 
Canada. London, 1760.' Now .first ascribed to Junius. 
To which is added, 1 A Refutation of the Letter, fyc. By 
an Officer? with incidental Notices of Lords Townshend 
and Sackville, Sir Philip Francis, and others. Edited by 
N. W. Simons, of the British Museum. Sm. 8vo. Picker- 
ing, 1841. 



122 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



13** S. III. FEB. 14, '63. 



Church, Fleet Street, 1760." It is addressed to 
Brigadier General Townshend, who, in consequence 
of the death of Wolfe, and of Monckton being dis- 
abled, signed the articles of the capitulation 
Quebec. The Letter is a bitter attack upon 
Townshend, to whom it is addressed, and scarcely 
less bitter upon Lord George Sackville. 

Townshend was, as may be supposed, greatly 
annoyed by this attack, and it is said, under the 
impression that Lord Albemarle was connected 
in some way with the publication, sent him a 
challenge, and they met in Marylebone Fields on 
the 4th November, but were interrupted. 

To this pamphlet, a reply, written obviously 
either by Townshend or under his inspiration, 
was published under the title of " A Refutation of 
the Letter to an Hon. Brigadier General Com- 
mander of His Majesty's Forces in Canada. By 
an Officer. Urit enim fulgore suo. London : 
Printed for R. Stevens, at Pope's Head in Pater- 
noster Row, MDCCLX. Price One Shilling." 

This reply, which the Monthly Review described 
as an "ill-judged and ill-composed defence," is 
also reprinted by Mr. Simons from a copy of the 
fourth edition in the British Museum. A copy of 
the first edition is now before me. There is 
nothing in it to indicate who was the writer of it, 
and Mr. Simons does not appear to have known 
who he was, or, indeed, to have endeavoured to 
ascertain it. It was not part of the question 
which he was examining. 

Thurlow, who came into Parliament for Tarn- 
worth, oneof Lord Townshead's boroughs, in 1768, 
is said to have been the author. If so, it may 
well be imagined that his silk gown was the 
first fruits of the services rendered by him to 
Townshend. 

And now for the authority on which this state- 
ment rests. 

In 1792 the notorious Charles Pigott published 
a series of scandalous attacks on the principal 
personages of the time, under the title of The 
Jockey Club ; or, a Sketch of the Manners of the 
Age. Then, as now, scandal found a ready sale, 
and the author was " encouraged to enlarge his 
original design," by the publication of a Second 
and a Third part, because, as he as logically as 
modestly put the case, " the extraordinary sale " 
was " the surest proof of the general approbation 
of its principles." 

But whatever may have been the cause, the 
sale was certainly very great, inasmuch as no less 
than twelve editions of the book were called for 
in the course of the year. 

To this scandalous chronicle a reply was pub- 
lished under the title of " An Answer to Three 
Scurrilom Pamphlets entitled * The Jockey Club' 
By a Member of the Jockey Club. Qui ea quce 
vult dicit, ea quce non vult audiet. London, printed 
for J. S. Jordan, No. 166, Fleet Street." 



It is in the counter-reply to Pigott's attack 
upon Lord Thurlow, that the author of An 
Answer thus ascribes Lord Thurlow's rise to the 
assistance rendered by him in 1760 to Brigadier 
Townshend : 

" This noble Lord owes his elevation to a circumstance 
but very little known. When General Wolfe was killed 
at Quebec (who by the bye has been much more honored 
than he merited, for a few hours before the action he 
complained of being cold, General Monkton gave him 
some brandy, and he drank so freely, he was literally in- 
toxicated), the command devolved upon General Towns- 
hend, now Marquis Townshend. Upon this occasion, 
somebody wrote a severe pamphlet on General Towns- 
hend's conduct at Quebec. It was called a Letter to a 
Brigadier- General, and, as it also contained a sort of side- 
wind but ample vindication of Lord George Sackville's 
conduct at Minden, the pamphlet was generally ascribed 
to his Lordship. At this time Lord Thurlow, then Mr. 
Thurlow, was a 3'oung barrister in the Temple : and it 
has been general!}' understood and believed that the 
pamphlet called a Refutation of the above Letter to a 
Brigadier- General was the production of his maiden pen; 
that this Refutation was the cause of his introduction to 
Lord Townshend, who afterwards brought him into Par- 
liament for Tamworth. It is to be observed that there 
is no disgrace in the transaction. There are other gen- 
tlemen who owe their advancement to their pens. Mr. 
Cooper (now Sir George Cooper, Bart.), another young 
barrister in the Temple, wrote a pamphlet on the change 
of Ministry in 1756, called A Pair of Spectacles for Sltort 
Sighted Politicians, which introduced him to Lord Rock- 
ingham, who made him one of the Secretaries of the 
Treasury for it, and likewise gave him a pension, to take 
place whenever he was removed, because he could not 
return to the bar." Answer to the Jockey Club, 2nd 
edit. pp. 77-79. 

It is of course very difficult to establish a fact 
of this nature after the lapse of so many years. 
But the circumstance of Thurlow taking his seat 
for Tamworth as the nominee of Lord Towns- 
hend in 1768 the very first Parliament which 
met after Townshend had succeeded to the Peer- 
age certainly goes far to establish the accuracy 
of the writer's statement, and to justify the infer- 
ence, that he owed his silk gown to the same in- 
fluence. T. 



NOTES AND QUERIES OX " JOSEPH ANDREWS." 

Fielding, in his novel of Joseph Andrews, de- 
icribes a dialogue between Parson Adams and 
he landlord of an inn, in which the following 
>assage occurs : 

" ' Trade,' answered Adams, ' as Aristotle proves in 
is first Chapter of Politics, is below a philosopher, and 

unnatural as it is managed now.' The host looked stead- 
astly at Adams, and after a minute's silence asked him 
If he was one of the writers of the Gazetteers? for I 
lave heard,' says he, ' they are writ by parsons.' ' Ga- 
;etteers!' answered Adams, 'what is that?' 'It's a 
lirty newspaper,' replied the host, ' which hath been 

given away all over the nation for these many years, 
o abuse trade and honest men, which I would not suffer 
o lie on my table, though it hath been oftered me for 

lothing. 5 " Bookii. c. 17. 






3 S. III. FEB. 14, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



123 



Can any of your readers explain the allusions 
in this passage ? 

Book iii. c. 1, is a development of Aristotle's 
dictum in the Poetic that poetry is more philo- 
sophical than history. 

In b. iii. ch. 6, Joseph Andrews makes the 
following remarks : 

" ' For my own part, when I have waited behind my 
lady in a room hung with fine pictures, while I have 
been looking at them, I have never once thought of 
their owner, nor hath any one else, as I ever observed; 
for when it has been asked whose picture that was, it 
was never once answered, the master's of the house ; but 
Ammyconni, Paul Varnish, Hannibal Scratchi, or Ho- 
garthi, which I suppose were the names of the painters.' " 

By the first of these names is meant Jacopo Ami- 
coni, who was born at Venice in 1675. He studied 
painting in his own city and at Rome; he sub- 
sequently settled at Munich; but in 1729 he re- 
moved to England, where he acquired consider- 
able celebrity, particularly as a decorative painter. 
He painted a staircase at Lord Tankerville's 
house in St. James's Square (since destroyed), 
representing stories of Achilles, Telemachus, and 
Tiresias, and the staircase at Powis House in 
Great Ormond Street, which was decorated with 
the story of Judith and Holofernes. He likewise 
painted portraits of the Queen and the three 
eldest princesses. See Walpole's Anecdotes of 
Painting, vol. iii. p. 446, ed. 1798, 4to. According 
to the^article in the Biographie Universelle, Ami- 
coni likewise painted the Loves of Jupiter and 
lo at Moor Park, in Hertfordshire. Walpole, 
however, ib. p. 417, states that the saloon at 
Moor Park was painted by Sir James Thornhill ; 
and the same statement recurs in Clutterbuck's 
History of Hertfordshire, vol. i. p. 198. Ami- 
coni ultimately transferred his residence to Spain, 
where he died in 1752, as court painter. It 
seems strange that Fielding should have placed 
this obscui-e painter on a level with Paolo Vero- 
nese, Annibal Caracci, and Hogarth. 

" Fanny was so hogged out with what had hap- 
pened to her in the day, that, notwithstanding all 
thoughts of her Joseph, she was fallen into so profound a 
sleep, that all the noise in the adjoining room had not 
been able to disturb her." Book iv. c. 14. 

Wright, in his Dictionary of Obsolete and Pro- 
vincial English, explains hugged as a north country 
word for fatigued, tired. Such is its sense in 
this passage. L. 



CONSTITQTIONES CLEMENTINA." 
I have in my possession {pro tempore) the fra" - 
ment of a manuscript, an illuminated copy of the 
Constitution's Clementina, passed at the Council 
of Vienne in 1312. It is written on vellum ; and 
the text, which is copiously glossated, is of a bold 
character suitable to the size (folio) of the volume. 



having the initial letter of each separate chapter 
or titulus splendidly illuminated in metal and 
colours, as has likewise the glosse or explanatory 
notes which surrounds, in somewhat smaller cha- 
racter of letter, the whole of the text, which 
occupies the centre of the page only, as is seen in 
the first specimens of printing executed at Venice, 
and other places on the Continent, where the im- 
portant art was earlier developed than in England. 
I am not aware whether this manuscript, when 
entire, comprised the whole of the Regulations 
passed by Pope Clement V. for the suppression of 
the then great laxity among the monks, and the 
establishing a stricter and more attentive disci- 
pline among the secular clergy ; but its contents 
were divided into three books, each of which con- 
tained the following heads or rubrics, viz. : 

" Liber I. De Summa . . . . et Fide Catholica. De 
Rescripts. De Electione et rectae Pietate. De Renun- 
ciacione. De Supplenda Negligencia Prelatorum. De 
Etate et qualiter et Ordine Preficiendorum. De Officio 
Vicarii. De Officio Delegati. De Officio Ordinarii. De 
Procuratoribus. De Restitutione in Integrum. 

" Liber II. De Judiciis. De Foro Competente. De 
cura Possessionis et Proprietatis. De Dolo et Contuma- 
cia. Ut, Lite Pendente, nil innovetur. De Sequestra- 
tione Possessionum et Fructuum. De Probationibus. De 
Testibus. De Jurejurando. De Exceptionibus. De Re 
judicata. De Appellationibus. 

" Liber III. De Vita inhonestata Clericorum. De Pre- 
bendis. De Concessione Prebenda in Ecclesiis non Va- 
catis. De Rebus Ecclesiae non Alienandis. De Rerum 
Permutatione. De Testamentis. De Seputuris (Sepul- 
turis?). De Decimis. De Regularibus Religiosorum. 
De Statu Monachorum et aliorum Religiosorum. De 
Religiosis Domibus. De Jure Patronatus. De Censibus. 
De Celebratione Missarum. De Baptismo et ejus Effecto. 
De Reliquiis et Veneratione Sanctorum. De Immunitate 
Ecclesiarum. De Sponsalibus. De Magistris. De Ju- 
deis et Saracenis. De Hereticis. De Homicidio volun- 
tario et casuali. De Usuriis. De Privilegiis et Excessibus 
Prelatorum. De Poenis. De Penetentiis et Remissioni- 
bus. De summis Excommunicationibus Suspensioneve 
Interdicti. De Verborum Significatione." 

Of the foregoing rubrics, the last twenty-one 
only are contained in the thirty-two pages, or 
eight skins of the vellum, now left, which is the 
concluding portion of the volume. On the last 
page are given the Contents, which are headed 
by the following, viz. " Ex Concilio Vienensi. 
Incipiunt Tituli sive Rubricse tocius Libri Con- 
stitucionum Clementinarum." 

At the conclusion of a lengthy notice of one 
Johannes Andreas, a Clementine brother, which 
follows the last glosse, is a maledictory sentence, 
often found in books, not only of this age but of 
all subsequent times, in a handwriting of the 
fourteenth or fifteenth century, viz. " Iste Liber 
est de Monasterio de Bardenay. Si quis ipsum 
alienaverit, Indignationem Dei omnipotentis in- 
currat." And underneath this is the chirograph ; 
most probably of that monastery, consisting of 
eight letters (capitals) ; but as the indenture, 
which contained the lower parts of these letters 



124 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. FEB. 14, '63. 



and was cut from the leaf, leaving an aperture 
about half an inch broad, along the whole length 
of the chirograph is lost, the word thus formed 
by the capitals (if any word it was) cannot now 
be made out. 

The libraries of our ancient monasteries, if we 
can infer from Leland's Catalogues of several of 
them, were most scantily supplied with books. 
Those enumerated by him as remaining in 
the library of Bardney when he inspected it, 
circ. 1541, consisted of three volumes only, viz. : 
Cronica Fratris Martini ; Historia Regum Mace" 
donum ; and Libellus Fulcheri de Captione Jero- 
salem. But this list was probably all that was 
left of the plunder to which this, along with most 
other like institutions, would be liable, especially 
of books and other portables of value, when the 
whole of them were on the point of falling into 
the royal treasury. And these Clementine Con- 
stitutions, with which this and probably most of 
the other larger monasteries were (by Papal in- 
junction ?) supplied, were, notwithstanding the 
solemn invocation written on one of their pages, 
among the articles purloined impiously or piously 
shall we say ? amid the havock in which monas- 
tic property of every kind was involved, for a 
long period of those times. 

To these my Notes, which I hope are sufficiently 
brief to be admitted, I will in conclusion subjoin 
a Query, and beg the solution of it from some of 
the learned readers of your valuable periodical, 
viz. The several uses to which these ancient chiro- 
graphs, the prototypes of our modern cheques, 
were applied ? R. 

Lincoln. 



SHAKSPEARE, SIDNEY, AND ESSEX. 
(Concluded from p. 106.) 



LETTER III. 



Love's Labour's Lost. There are good grounds 
for the opinion, this comedy was in some measure 
founded on Sidney's masque, The Lady of May. 
Thus " the character of Master Rombus bears 
a striking resemblance to that of, the erudite 
Holofernes ; he, too, draweth out the thread of 
his verbosity finer than the staple of his argu- 
ment.' No doubt they were both intended to 
ridicule the tortured English, called Euphuism ; " 
and Master Rombus, after delivering " with 
many special graces this learned oration " to the 
Queen, is dismissed, like Holofernes, with similar 
discourtesy. 

The Lady of May was hastily composed in 1578 
for the entertainment of her Majesty, then on a 
visit to the Earl of Leicester at Wanstead House, 
so that Sidney was practically the Biron on that 
occasion. 



Love's Labour's Lost appears to have been 
formed directly on the rules laid down by Sidney 
in his Defence of Poesy, where, speaking against 
low comedy he says : 

" For what is it to make folks gape at a wretched 
beggar, and a beggarly clown, &c. But rather a busy 
loving courtier, and a heartless threatening Thraso; a 
self -wise seeming schoolmaster ; a wry -transformed traveller : 
these, if we saw walk in stage names, which we play 
naturally, therein were delightful laughter, and teaching 
delightfulness." 

But notwithstanding these resemblances, it is 
probable that in Biron Shakspeare had an eye to 
the young Earl of Essex, rather than to the more 
sedate Sidney ; and Essex was also esteemed one 
of the best poets among the nobility of England ; 
his famous feather-triumph, his sarcastic remark 
on Sir Charles Blount, " Now I perceive every 
fool must wear a favour," but more especially his 
pageants and quaint devices before the Queen, 
all having love for their argument, show how 
completely Shakspeare has hit him off in the 
character of Biron. 

Possibly in this comedy Shakspeare may have 
followed the example of Lyly in his court come- 
dies, and complimented Queen Elizabeth as the 
Princess, in which case other courtiers being the 
other sonnetteers, Sir Walter Raleigh would be 
the King, whose sonnet, full of tears, reminds us 
of 

" A lamentable lay 

Of great unkindness and of usage hard, 
Of Cynthia, the Ladie of the Sea." 

Don Armado may be a satire on the Earl of 
Oxford, who had travelled in Italy, and greatly 
affected foreign manners and modes of speech. 

Romeo and Juliet. In this tragedy the Capulets 
and Montagues remind us of the rival factions at 
the court of Elizabeth ; and the jeering and 
fighting of the swash-bucklers was not an un- 
common occurrence in the streets of London in 
Shakspeare's own day. 

As old Capulet has a strong family likeness to 
Polonius, he must be another portrait of Lord 
Burghley; Montague will be the Earl of Lei- 
cester ; and Romeo, of course, the young Earl of 
Essex ; and it may be presumed, the violent in- 
dignation of the Queen on discovering his mar- 
riage with Sidney's widow in November, 1590, 
gave Shakspeare the hint of writing this play. 

These are all very ingenious suppositions, it 
may be objected; but upon what basis do they 
rest? This is the very circumstance that gave 
rise to the present essay, the principal items of 
which were jotted down last February. Those 
critics and commentators who feel themselves 
justified in suspecting Shakspeare, may possibly 
in Polonius have satirised Lord Burghley, be- 
cause he left ten precepts, can scarcely refuse 
their assent to the following evidence, that old 



3* d S. III. FEB. 14, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



125 



Capulet is another representation of that minister. 
Dates are stubborn things : 

" It was in the summer of this year (1561) that we 
first read of the Queen's visiting the Secretary at his own 
house." " To Mr. Secretary Cecil's, where she supped. 
Here her Council waited on her, with many lords and 
knights, and ladies ; and great cheer made till midnight ; 
and then her Grace rode back to the Charter House, 
where she slept that night." Nares, vol. ii. p. 238. 

Thomas Cecil, Lord Burghley's eldest son, was 
married November 27, 1564, and his son, William, 
named after his grandfather, was born in 1566. 

Romeo and Juliet was produced in the summer 
of 1591, /'"Tis since the earthquake now eleven 
years;" alluding to the earthquake, April 6th, 
1580. 

The Queen's first visit to Mr. Secretary Cecil's 
must have been to him a memorable event, and 
most likely he danced with her Majesty on that 
occasion. Very likely he did a similar feat at the 
marriage of his son, and again on the birth of his 
grandson and heir. 

" 1st Cap. How long is it now, since last yourself and I 
Were in a mask ? 

2nd Cap. By 'r lady, thirty years. 

1st Cap. What, man ! 'tis not so much, 'tis not so much : 
'Tis since the nuptial of Lucentio, 
Come Pentecost as quickly as it will, 
Some five and twenty years; and then we mask'd. 

2nd Cap. 'Tis more, 'tis more ; his son is elder, sir ; 
His son is thirty. 

1st Cap. Will you tell me that ? 

His son was but a ward two years ago." Act I. Sc. 5. 

We here see in the loquacity and half-forget- 
fulness of the two old lords, how adroitly Shak- 
speare identifies the Capulets with Mr. Secretary- 
Cecil, u thirty y 'ears, Jive and twenty, 'tis more, 'tis 
more." 

" Prince Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word., 
By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, 
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets." 

In these lines Shakspeare must refer to three 
violent quarrels at the Court of Elizabeth, per- 
haps to the disputes immediately preceding the 
death of Leicester ; but the following extract is 
peculiarly apposite. In 1564 there was a quarrel 
between the Earl of Leicester and the Earl of 
Sussex, who advocated the marriage of Elizabeth 
with the Archduke Charles : 

" These disputes created a kind of civil war in the 
very palace, both lords openly avowing their distaste to 
each other, and keeping their servants armed about their 
persons, whenever they went abroad, as if things were 
to be decided by the sword. But the Queen, taking up 
the matter, reconciled them, or rather prevented an open 

About the same period, " Leicester was the 
avowed champion of the Queen of Scot's title, 
and was very near ruining Lord Keeper Bacon 
and Secretary Cecil for being secret favourers of 
the house of Suffolk." And again, on Leicester's 
return to the Netherlands in November, 1587, 



he was thwarted just before his death by Lord 
Burghley and Lord Chancellor Hatton in his am- 
bitious project of being the Queen's Lieutenant 
in England and Ireland. 

Let us, however, examine a little further, and 
we shall see our previous analysis supports the 
following suppositions, and they, in turn, justify 
it. Benvolio, with his hazel eyes, nephew to 
Montague, would be a reminiscence of Sir Philip 
Sidney ; in the fiery Tybalt we readily recognise 
the Earl of Oxford his quarrel with Benvolio is 
characteristic ; Mercutio and Paris, kinsmen to 
the Prince (Queen Elizabeth), are Anthony and 
Francis Bacon; and thus we find, attached to 
Lady Capulet's advice, " Read o'er the volume of 
young Paris' face," an interest and a meaning 
previously unknown and wanting ; ten years later 
Shakspeare himself may have shuddered at the 
following words : 

" Pans. Condemned villain, I do apprehend thee : 
Obey and go with me, for thou must die." Act V. Sc. 3. 

The language of Paris, it must be acknowledged, 
savours more of the law than of the young cava- 
lier, "I do apprehend thee," three times re- 
peated. His order also to his page to lie on the 
hollow ground and listen for a footstep, smacks 
of the young philosopher; whilst his innocent 
threat of apprehending a madman reminds us of 
the man whose cunning could ill cope with the 
craft of a Cecil, " of the old fox and the little 
beagle " : read o'er the volume of young Paris' 
face and this short scene, and Francis Bacon 
stands confest. 

The use of the word apprehend appears to have 
been a habit with Bacon ; it occurs repeatedly in 
his letters, and the following singular instance 
confirms this supposition. In his Declaration of 
the Treasons of Essex he says, " Certain it is Sir 
Ferdinando Gorges accused Blunt to have per- 
suaded him to kill, or at least apprehend, Sir 
Walter Ralegh ; " but in Gorges' Confession, we 
read : " The said Sir Christopher Blunt per- 
suaded him either to surprise Sir Walter Ralegh 
or to kill him." (Spedding, vol. ii. pp. 267, 296.) 
Gorges, in a manuscript writ to vindicate him- 
self, says, " If it be demanded of me why I did 
not then take Sir W. Ralegh ? " and Oldys writes, 
" to murderer seize Sir W. Ralegh at this^meet- 
ing," p. 331. Hence we infer the expression of 
Paris, / do apprehend thee, is characteristic of 
Bacon. 

I take this opportunity of noticing two or 
three passages, illustrative of Shakspeare, in the 
letters of Lord Bacon. At the end of a letter to 
Lord Burghley he says, " I will still be your 
beadsman," and Proteus bids farewell to Valen- 
tine, " For I will be your beadsman." Mr. Armi- 
tage Brown argues stoutly, Shakspeare must have 
visited Italy before writing the Merchant of 



126 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'd S. III. FEB. 14, '63. 



Venice. " Where did be learn of an old vil 
lager's coming into the city with ' a dish of doves 
as a present to his son's master ? " (p. 1 10.) Whj 
with Anthony Bacon he may have partaken of an 
old villagers dish of doves. Thus writes Ladj 
Bacon to her son : " This Monday one broughi 
hither for you from Mr. Gray dozen ^ pigeons 
whereof I send you the dozen." " I send the firsl 
flight of my doves to you both, and God bless you 
In Christ." Spedding, vol. i. pp. 115, 246; the 
letters being dated July 24, 1592, and April 18 
1593. Anthony Bacon returned to England in 
the spring of 1592, and took up his quarters at 
Gray's Inn, and from him Shakspeare may have 
obtained his intimate knowledge of Italian man- 
ners. Lord Southampton was also of Gray's Inn, 
and must have been well acquainted with such 
an honest good fellow as Anthony, and all three 
may, with Francis and Essex, have had many a 
Nodes Ambrosiancp together. This delightful sup- 
position may be regarded as a fact, if Pope's 
criticism on "Paris' face" be true, " This ridi- 
culous speech is entirely added since the first 
edition." 

In the Sonnets Rearranged, I have pointed out 
that the 95th Sonnet (73rd ed. 1609) proves, the 
poet instead of being past middle age, " is really 
a young man, but looking old for his years, 
despondent, in bad health, anticipating an early 
death ; " and Bacon writes, " Which of her Ma- 
jesty's grace being begun in my first years, I 
would be sorry she should estrange in my last 
years ; for so I account them, reckoning by health 
not by age" (Spedding, vol. ii. p. 162.) 

In conclusion I would observe, that in the 
Footsteps of Shakspeare, published just twelve 
months ago in the beginning of November, 1861, 
I have given a more homely explanation of some 
of the characters in these plays ; but I have 
strictly forborne making any unnecessary allusions 
thereto, that the reader might form his own in- 
ferences with an unbiassed judgment. C. 



TRANSLATION" OF THE REMAINS OF CARDI- 
NAL XIMENEZ, TO A NEW MONUMENT, IN 
THE "IGLESIA MAGISTRAL" AT ALCALA DE 
HENARES, IN THE YEAR 1857. 
Foreigners often reproach Spaniards with the 
ingratitude which they have so constantly shown 
towards their great and illustrious men, both 
living and dead. But this reproach does not hold 
good in the case of Cardinal Ximenez. His me- 
mory has always been revered in Spain, from the 
period of his death in 1517, up to the present 
time. Queen Isabella, " the Catholic," was indeed 
blessed in having had such a man for her prime 
minister, and such a prelate for the archiepiscopal 
see of Imperial Toledo ; and this too at a period 



when all their united zeal and energies were re- 
quired, for the renovation of the Spanish church. 
The cardinal died a most edifying death on the 
8th of November, 1517, at a small town named 
Roa, situated between Segovia and Valladolid, in 
the eighty-second year of his age. The principal 
part of his property was left to his beloved Uni- 
versity of Alcala. Large legacies were also left 
to the monasteries, hospitals, and other establish- 
ments which he had either founded or restored. 
The original will is carefully preserved in the 
" Universidad Central" at Madrid. Francisco 
Ruyz, Bishop of Avila, his faithful friend and 
companion through life, was named his chief exe- 
cutor. He was also intrusted with the care of 
his interment at Alcala, and with the publication 
of the Complutensian Polyglot. 

A herald having proclaimed the cardinal's death, 
all the inhabitants of Roa and the surrounding 
country, hastened to kiss the hands of the illustri- 
ous deceased (whom many revered as a saint) 
while he was lying in state. His body was em- 
balmed, and in a few days conveyed to Alcala 
amidst the grief of the population, and the blaze 
of innumerable torches. When the procession 
arrived there, the professors and students of the 
University met the body at one of the gates, ac- 
companied by all the religious of the city the 
corporation, the bishops, grandees, and nobles of 
the neighbouring towns ; the abbot and chapter 
of the collegiate church of San Justo y Pastor, 
and an immense concourse of people of every 
rank and age. 

The body was placed in the mortuary chapel 
sreviously prepared for it, where the matins for 
;he dead were solemnly chanted, and many masses 
)fiered up for the repose of his soul. An eloquent 
doctor named Sirvelo preached the panegyric of 
.he deceased cardinal. The body was interred 
n the chapel belonging to the College of San 
.Idefonso. A marble monument was afterwards 
erected over his tomb, on which a portrait of 
Ximenez in his pontiScal robes was beautifully 
culptured. On one of the sides are still to be 
een the following lines : 

" Condideram Musis Franciscus grande Lyceum ; 

Condor in exiguo nunc ego sarcophago. 
Prastextam junxi sacco, galeamque galero, 

Frater, Dux, Praesul, Cardineusque Pater. 
Quin virttite mea junctum est diadema cucullo, 
Cum mihi regnanti paruit Hesperia." 

The body of the cardinal remained in the vault 
of the chapel of San Ildefonso from 1517 to 1597; 
but as the vault was then found to be very damp, 
the remains were taken up in 1597 by order of 
the king, and placed in a recess on the gospel side 
of the high altar in the said college. There they 
remained till 1664, when they were removed to 
another place in the chapel, where they could be 
seen through an iron grating by the faithfuL 



3rd ?. Hi. F Kr> . 14, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



127 



But as the veneration of the people seemed to 
become more and more intense, it was thought 
proper by the ecclesiastical authorities to remove 
the venerable remains to the original spot, where 
the body had been first interred. This translation 
was accordingly made in 1668. But in 1677 the 
members of the University, fearful lest the remains 
might perish altogether on account of the dampness 
of the vault, resolved privately to remove them once 
more to a niche on the right of the high altar. 
This translation was carefully effected under the 
direction of Padre Quintanilla. The bones and 
part of the skull were wrapt in silk and cloth of 
gold. An account was inserted in the Archives of 
the University, and the niche entirely closed up. 
In 1778 they were examined by Dr. Luque, Don 
Orozco y Rojas, and Don Juan Jose Barrios. 
But from that period till 1850 it seems that all 
traces of the cardinal's remains had been lost, for 
the documents had disappeared which stated where i 
they rested. But what was perhaps more deplor- 
able, the government had allowed the magnificent 
college of San Ildefonso to fall into decay, when 
the university was translated to Madrid. The 
chapel, too, which contained in some unknown 
part, the remains of Ximenez was daily becoming 
a complete ruin, the whole of the building having 
been sold to an individual named Q.uinto, who, 
heedless of the sacred associations connected with 
the college, began to pull down the famous tower, 
in which were hung the bells cast from the cannon 
taken at the siege of Oran by the cardinal. This 
act of barbarism was too much for the inhabitants 
of Alcala to endure. With a spirit of enthusiasm 
deserving the highest praise, they raised a sub- j 
scription, and repurchased the college from Quinto, ' 
for 30,000 reals. 

In the meantime, a document was fortunately 
found amongst some old papers in one of the col- 
leges, which proved to be a copy of the transla- 
tion which had been made in 1677. The docu- 
ment pointed out the exact spot where the remains 
were to be found. The authorities hastened to the 
place indicated ; the cavity was soon discovered, 
and also a chest, enclosed in which was a parch- 
ment testifying that the remains in the chest were 
those of Cardinal Ximenez. The following are 
the words : 

ft 

" Hasc sunt ossa S. N. Em. D. Fundatoris : ne amplitis 
putrescerent, hue translata sunt, postquam juridice ab ! 
.hpiscopis Arcadiae et Cesarae, pect .... sunt: 1G77." 

A new and magnificent mausoleum was now 
erected, by permission of the government, in the 
church of San Justo y Pastor, called also " La 
Iglesia Magistral." 

Though the document was found in 1850, it 
was not till 1857 that the solemn ceremony of the 
final translation took place. April the 27th of 
that year, will ever be memorable in the annals of 



Alcala. Nearly all the ministers of her majesty's 
government were present, having arrived from 
Madrid the preceding day. They were most hos- 
pitably entertained in the palace of the Marquis 
del Morante, who took the liveliest interest in , 
every thing connected with the ceremony. The 
canons of the metropolitan cathedral of Toledo, 
and the chaplains of the Mozarabic rite belonging 
to the said cathedral were also present, as well as 
representatives of the Chapter of Siguenza, and 
the civil and ecclesiastical authorities of Torre- 
laguna, the birth-place of Ximenez. 

The procession having been formed^ passed 
through the principal streets of Alcala, accom- 
panied with military bands, and a long train of 
dukes, marquises, rectors of colleges and universi- 
ties ; senators, crowds of students from Madrid 
and Salamanca, and an immense number of specta- 
tors. Troops of the civil guard lined the streets, 
and the windows and balconies were adorned with, 
tapestry, &c. On arriving at the entrance of the 
church, which was most beautifully decorated, 
the remains of the cardinal were borne along the 
nave to the choir, where waved the standard of 
Ximenez, which had been carried before him at 
the siege of Oran. After a solemn pontifical mass, 
celebrated by the Patriarch of the Indies, a mag- 
nificent panegyric was pronounced on the great 
cardinal by Doctor Bernardo Rodrigo, one of 
her majesty's chaplains. The usual prayers for 
the dead having been chanted, and the absolu- 
tions given, the urn containing the remains was 
placed in a small hearse, and carried by four 
canons of the cathedral in procession round the 
church, accompanied by the clergy and civil au- 
thorities. The spectacle was indeed most solemn 
and imposing. The blaze of innumerable large 
wax candles, which the clergy held in their hands, 
the sweet smell of the incense, the organ's solemn 
notes, and the chant of the choir, all added their 
respective parts to the impressive scene, which 
gladdened every heart throughout Spain, that^ re- 
vered the memory of one of her most illustrious 
sons. 

The urn, which was enclosed in a coffin of lead, 
was finally deposited in the tomb which had been 
prepared for it. 

I am indebted to the Marques del Morante, 
who, in 1857, kindly sent me from Madrid a pam- 
phlet, from which has been compiled this interest- 
ing account. Having said so much about the 
Polyglot of Ximenez, I hope the readers of 
"IS. & Q." will be pleased that I have given 
them an authentic relation of the translation of 
his venerable remains. 

JOHN D ALTON. 

Norwich. 



128 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[8* S. III. FEB. 14, -'63. 



VALENTINE NOTES. 

" VALENTINI ICONES." The following passag 
occurs in Bacon's Descriptio Globi Intellectualis 



H De caelis vero et spatiis immateriatis, religion! omnin 
standum et permittendum. Qua enim a Platonicis, e 
nuper a Patricio (ut diviniores scilicet habeantur in phi 
losophia) dicuntur, non sine superstitione magna et jac 
tantiS, et quasi mente turbata, denique ausu nimio, fructi 
nullo, similia Valentini iconibus et somniis ; ea nos pro 
rebus commentitiis et levibus habemus." Vol. xi. p. 21 
ed. Montagu. 

Francis Patricius, or Patrizzi, the Neo-Platonic 
philosopher mentioned in this passage, was born 
in 1529 ; and died at Rome in 1597. The fan- 
tastic speculations of the modern Platonists are 
here compared to "the images and dreams o 
Valentine." Some of the customs connected with 
St. Valentine's Day, seem to be alluded to ; but 
the article on the subject in Brand's Popula 
Antiquities, affords no assistance. The most pre- 
valent custom seems to have been that of drawing 
lots for lovers. Perhaps some of your readers 
can throw light upon this allusion. L. 



ST. VALENTINE. How this saint came to be 
chosen as the patron of lovers seems to be still a 
vexata qucestio, but I think that some light may 
be thrown on the subject by the fact that valantin 
is still used in Normandy in the sense of sweet- 
heart. Frederic Pluquet, a well-known Norman 
antiquary, in a small brochure on the Popular 
Tales, Patois, frc. of Bayeux, explains the word 
Valantin as signifying " petit galant ; le v pour le 
g" and in a tale by a modern French novelist, 
Emile Souvestre, the scene of which is laid in 
Normandy, and in which the dialect of that 
province is occasionally introduced, both valantin 
and galantin are used in this sense. There can 
be no doubt that galant and vaillant are both 
derived from the Latin valens, and our English 
word gallant, with a distinguishing accentuation, 
combines both meanings. Valantin being thus so 
closely identified with galant, it is easy to conceive 
how a saint with such a name as Valentine, and 
whose feast occurs at "a time when all living 
nature inclines to couple," should have been fixed 
upon as the patron of lovers. I have not been able 
to find any satisfactory reason for believing that 
he was so honoured elsewhere than in Great 
Britain and France. The assertion of some wri- 
ters that the custom of choosing valentines had 
its origin in heathen times, and was attempted to 
be turned to a religious purpose by the Saint, 
seems to want confirmation. If this was the case, 
traces of the custom would surely be found in 
other Christian countries. H. DE MAEEVILLE. 



iHtnar 

FITZGIBBON MONUMENT. In one of my ram- 
bles over the ancient quarter of Acradina, near 
this city, I chanced to enter the Franciscan Con- 
vent of S. Lucia, and my attention was attracted 
by a large dingy painting in the chapel, repre- 
senting a lady at full length with her four children 
lying around her. One of the monks told me 
that they "all died in one day," and showed me 
the slab in an opposite aisle which covered their 
remains. On the canvass was the following in- 
scription : 

" Sig. D. Anastatia de Fitz Gibon figlia di D. Florentzo 
de Macarthy de Kill Coach Sig. de Gfann Dermoff della 
Provincia di Gorre de Regno d'Irlanda Moglie del Sig r 
D. Gulielmo de Fitz Gibon tenente Colonnello Sig. de 
Miltau Balinatra Kil Natovrouh della provincia di Gorre 
del Regno d' Irlanda Madre di D. Tomaso D. Anna D. 
Eleonora D. Catarina de Fitz Gibon. Obyt Syracusis 
Die 18 Feb. An. 1728." 

Does the family still exist, .and is there any 
any record or tradition of their simultaneous 
disease, to confirm the story of the monk ? 

W. L. NICHOLS. 

Syracuse, Jan. 27, 1863. 

EIKON BASILIKE. In the account in Bohn's 
Lowndes, of a book of such interest as the Eiicdir 
Ba<riAiKi], a line would have been useful to note the 
peculiarity in the earlier editions (confined, I be- 
iieve, to those of 1648,) of the occurrence of the 
word "feral" in the 15th chapter; which was 
afterwards altered to " fatal," and which, together 
with the use of the word "cycloptick" in the 
12th chapter, affords one of the most suggestive 
arguments that Dr. Gauden was the author. (See 
ilallam's Constitutional History, note at the end 
f the 2nd vol., edit. London, 1829.) So far as I 
enow, the occurrence of the word " feral " has not 
>een mentioned by any of the correspondents of 
' N. & Q." who have described the old copies ; 
ut it must materially increase the value of the 
ditions in which the word is found, and might, 
herefore, have been suitably mentioned in the 
ew edition of Lowndes. My copy is stated to be 

Reprinted in R. M. Anno Dom. 1648." What 
oes"R.M." stand for?* 

J. HENRY SHORTHOUSE. 

Edgbaston. 

POPE'S WILLOW. The enclosed paragraph has 
ppeared in several papers. May I suggest that 
t be preserved in the columns of " N. & Q." ? 

" This celebrated willow came originally from Spain, 
nclosing a present to Lady Suffolk, who came over with 
reorge II. and Queen Caroline, and was a favourite of 
oth, particularly so of the King. Mr. Pope was in 
>mpany when the covering was taken off the present. 
ie observed the pieces of stick appeared as if there were 
ome vegetation, and added, Perhaps the}' may produce 



[* In Regis Memoriam.3 



3"i S. III. FEB. 14, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



129 



something we have not in England.' Under this idea 
he planted it in his garden, and it produced the willow 
tree which has given birth to so many others. When 
Lord Mendip purchased Pope's Villa, at Twickenham, he 
made various alterations in the grounds, and ordered the 
willow to be cut down." 

TRETANE. 

HISTORY OF BEIGGS'S LOGARITHMS. It is a re- 
markable circumstance in the history of mathe- 
matics, that the logarithms of the first thousand 
integral numbers, although calculated and printed 
by an Englishman in London, has never yet been 
correctly described by the historians. Henry 
Briggs printed what he called Logarithmorum 
Chilias Prima, on sixteen leaves of duodecimo 
size, without any indication of place or time, in- 
troducing them with the following remarks, which 
I quote entire : 

" Quam autor typis excudendam curavit non eo con- 
cilio vt public! juris fieret ; sed partim, vt quorundam 
suorum necessariorum desiderio privatim satisfaceret : 
partim, ut ejus adjumento, non solum Chiliadas aliquot 
insequentes, sed etiam integrum Logarithmorum Ca- 
nonem, omnium Triangulorum Calculo inservientem 
commodius absolveret. Habet enim Canonem Sinuum 
a se ipso, ante Decennium per aequationes Algebraicas et 
differentias ipsis Sinubus proportionales pro singulis 
gradibus et graduum centesimis, a primis fundamentis 
accurate extractum; quern una cum Logarithmis ad- 
junctis, volente Deo, in lucem se daturam sperat, quam, 
primum commode licuerit. 

" Quod autem hi Logarithm! diversi sint ab iis, quos 
clarissimus inventor, memoriae semper colendaa, in suo 
edidit canone mirifico; sperandum, ejus librum posthu- 
mum abunde nobis propediera satisfacturum. Qui autori 
(cum eum domi sua?, Edinburgi, bis invisserit et apud 
eum humanissime exceptus per aliquot septimanas liben- 
tissime mansisset ; eique horum partem praecipuam quam 
turn absoluerat ostendisset) suadere non destitit, ut hunc 
in se laborem susciperet. Cui ille non invitus morem 
gessit. 

" In tenui ; sed non tenuis, fructusve laborve." 

The copy in the Museum is a Sloane Book in 
the shabbiest of bindings, and yet this is the 
editio princeps of a work that must be used by 
every- candidate in a civil or military examina- 
tion. Hutton is inaccurate ; and even the author 
of the article "Briggs" in the English Cyclo- 
padia makes here a slip, for he writes, " having 
printed . . . the first thousand numbers to nine 
places." This is obviously incorrect, for /3 gives 
log. of 69 = 183884909073726, which is to 14 
places as we now say. WM. DAVIS. 

SIR THOMAS GRESHAM. There is reason for 
assuming that Sir Thomas Gresham shared in the 
church property in Somersetshire, which fell to 
the crown at the Reformation. In Wedmore 
church, Somersetshire, there was a chantry de- 
dicated to St. Anne, which had a considerable 
endowment in land, and this land seems to have 
fallen into the hands of Sir Thomas Gresham, as 
I find in a deed dated 10 May, 37th Elizabeth, 
being a conveyance from Thomas Stone to Ed- 



ward Stone, the estate (including a " Piscary ") 
is described as having been " sometyme parcell 
of the possessions of the late dissolved Chantry 
there of St. Ann," and bought by Thomas Stone 
of Sir Thomas Gresham, Knight, of Asterley, in 
the county of Middlesex, deceased." INA. 

Wells, Somerset. 

CASTLE WILLIAM, BOSTON. The following 
cutting from a communication signed N. B. S. 
in your learned contemporary, the Historical 
Magazine and Notes and Queries of America, 
should be transferred to your pages : 

" At the time the British evacuated the town of Bos- 
ton, on the 17th of March, 1776, the Castle in Boston 
Harbor (then called Castle William, in honour of Wil- 
liam III., King of Great Britain) was destroyed by the 
retiring enemy. A slate-stone, measuring about twenty- 
five by twenty-five inches, was subsequently found 
among the ruins, bearing the following inscription : 

* ANNO DECIMO TERTIO REGNI WILHELMI TERTII MAG : 
BRIT : FR : & HIB : REGIS INVICTISSIMI HOC MUNIMEN- 
TUM (EX EJOS NOMINE WILHELMI CASTELLUM NUNCU- 
PATUM) FUIT INCEPTUM. ANNO SECUNDO REGNI ANN^E 
MAG : BRIT : FR : & HIB : BEGINS SERENISSUVLE PERFEC- 
TUM ANNOQ : DOMINI MDCCTII. 

A Tribune Wolfgango Wilhelmo Romero Regiarum 
Majestatum in Septentrionale Americas Architecto Mili- 
tari primario constructum.' " Vol. vi. p. 34. 

GRIME. 

CHESHIRE PROVERB. To " tear limb (?) from 
Warburton," is a proverb thoughout England; 
but it is probably not as generally known that it 
owes its origin to Lymm cum Warburton, which 
forms two medieties of a rectory on the Cheshire 
bank of the Mersey. M. D. 



CRuerfrtf. 

As TO c, CH, AND K. It is a matter of some 
interest to ascertain historically the periods at 
which changes in the sounds indicated by these let- 
ters have taken place ; and the reasons of one being 
in certain cases replaced by another are well worthy 
of inquiry. Much may be due to the caprice of 
printers, as being influenced by some temporary 
convenience, or by their supply of types. The 
following instances seem curious and somewhat 
inexplicable. In Rushworth's Historical Collec- 
tions, vol. ii. part 11. the printer's date on the 
title-page being A.D. 1680, there is presented, 
p. 756, the Declaration of King Charles I. in 
answer to the proceedings of the Scottish Conven- 
tions. On that page we have the expressions, 
"kirk and kingdom," but in p. 758 we have the 
words "this church and kingdom." In quoting 
the words of his opponents in p. 759, the^Declara- 
tion has " covenant between God and this church 
and kingdom ; " while in the next line but one 
stand the words, " peace of this kirk and king- 
dom." In words addressed by a Scottish noble- 



130 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3'* S. III. FEB. 14, '63. 



man to a Scottish assembly, we have, p. 844, 
" church and kingdom." In a document of Scot- 
tish origin, p. 857, we have " church " and "kirk," 
in adjoining lines, applied to the same body. 

It would be interesting to discover whether or 
not these variations existed in the documents 
which Itushworth copied. Are the manuscripts 
in existence from which he derived the materials 
of his work ? 

Are we entitled to infer from the indiscriminate 
use of the terms " kirk " and " church " that the 
pronunciation was the same ? When was it that 
"charta," giving origin to " card," became in 
sound "tsharta ; " or " canticle " and " chaunt " 
varied their initial sounds so greatly ? Are not 
these changes due in some degree to the influence 
of the queens of the Stuart sovereigns ? Have 
they not originated from a French fashion of pro- 
nunciation ? CONSTANTINE. 

Cape Town, South Africa. 

MOTTO AND DEVICE OF THE UNIVERSITY or 
CAMBRIDGE. In Ward's Life of the Learned and 
Pious Dr. H. More of Cambridge, Lond., 1710, 
occurs the following passage : 

" Methinks that Emblematical Representation of our 
Alma Hater Cantabrigia, pur equally both indulgent and 
renowned Mother, the University of Cambridge, with her 
Arras stretched out, and Breasts flowing, holding the 
Sun in one hand, and the Sacred Celestial Cup in another ; 
with this Motto round, ' Hinc Lucem et Pocula Sacra ' 
(^ From hence issue Light and the Sacred Dravghts of 
Wisdom and Knowledge'), supported on both sides with 
the Angels, as it were, of Philosophy and Religion ; I 
s&y this noble Representation, or becoming Hierogly- 
ph ick, may in a secondary sense very well befit our 
Author himself." P. 148. 

I should be glad to know whence this Motto is 
taken? On looking at the Index to " X. & Q.," 
I find it was made the subject of a Query before 
(1 st S. i. 76), but seems to have met with no 
reply. Abp. Leighton frequently quotes it, e. g. 
in his Medit. EtMco-Crit. in Psalm xxxii. : "O 
puros, et perennes, et super omnia dulces Scrip- 
turarum Fontes ! Hinc lucem liaurire est et po- 
cula sacra" Professor Scholefield of Cambridge, 
in his edition of the Meditationes, gives us no help 
here. In a flyleaf of Lcighton's French Bible, at 
Dunblane, he has written the same sentence in 
the shorter form, " Hinc lucem et ponda sacra" 

ElRIONNACH. 

CALVERT, AUTHOR OF THE " HISTORY OF KNARES- 
BOROUGH." The death of this gentleman, on 
Dec. 3, 1862, at the age of ninety-two, is recorded 
in the Gentleman's Magazine, ccxiv. 132. Can 
any of your readers supply his Christian name ? 
I cannot meet with a copy of his work, nor do I 
find his name under " Knaresborough" in the Post 
Office Directory for Yorkshire. S. Y. R. 

A FRENCH TRACT TRANSLATED BY WAKE. 
" Sure and honest means for the conversion of all here- 
tics; and wholesome Advice and Expedients for the 



Reformation of the Church. Writ by one of the Com- 
munion of the Church of Rome, and translated from the 
French. Printed at Cologn. 4to. Lond. 1688." With a 
Preface (Anon.) by William Wake, M.A., pp. viii. 
Author's Pref. 14120. 

Cannot the name of the French author be 

found ? BlBLIOTHECAR. CHETHAM. 

GIBSON, ROXBURGHSHIRE. A family of this 
name lived near Gordon in 1650. Any account of 
them will be very acceptable. 2. 0. 

HERALDIC. Will any of your correspondents 
skilled in heraldry supply me with the following 
information : . 

Whose arms were these ? 

1. Or, a lion rampant azure, debruised with a 
bar componee, arg. et gul. 

2. Buree of eight, arg. et azure, 3 chaplets or, 
orgresses gul., 2 and 1, charged with as many 
quarter foils. 

3. Vert, a saltier engrailed or. 

4. Gules, a chevron between 3 plates. 

5. Or, a bend sable. 

6. Arg. 3 bars, gules. 

7. Arg. on a fess azure, 3 fleur-de-lis or. 

8. Lozenges arg. et gules. 

9. On a canton gules. 

10. On a canton gules, in a bend or. 

If they can give me any dates, or other in- 
formation connected with the original grants, or 
having reference to the families who bore them, I 
shall be exceedingly obliged. A. E. W. 

I am very desirous of ascertaining to what fa- 
mily the arms below described at present belong, 
and shall feel greatly obliged for the information : 

A chevron between three anchors. Motto, 
" Jesus anchora." Crest : on a wreath an arm, 
embowed, the hand holding an anchor. S. D. S. 

Gules, on a fesse argent, 3 escallop shells (pro- 
per ?), between as many crescents, 2, 1, or. To 
what family, of what county, do these arms be- 
long, and where can I find any account of the 
family ? MUSAFIR. 

HODGE OF GLADSMUIR, NEAR EDINBURGH, 1710. 
A pedigree of this family wanted. 2. . 

LAMBTON FAMILY : "THE TIMES" NEWSPAPER 
OF 1828. In consequence of certain remarks 
respecting the family of Lambton, which, if I re- 
collect rightly, were made about the time when 
the late Mr. W. H. Lambton (father of the pre- 
sent Earl of Durham) was created a peer, I wrote 
and published in The Times newspaper a letter 
in vindication of the family. 

I should now be obliged if any of the readers 
of " N. & Q." could refer me to this letter. I 
believe its date to have been some time in 1828; 
but am not quite sure, owing to the many years 
that have elapsed since it was written. B. T. C. 
Lincoln's Inn. 



FEB. 14, '63. ] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



131 






LEITH FAMILY. Can any of your readers give 
me any information about the Leith family, prior 
to the time of William Leith, Provost of Edin- 
burgh (1350), he being the first one of that name 
I have cotne across. I fail also to find in Burke 
any mention of William Leith's descendants till 
the time of John Leith,* ancestor of the Leiths of 
Leith Hall. I have reason to believe, from the 
name (which means channel in the Norse f), that 
the family came over originally from Scandinavia. 
The surname Leith is still to be met "with in 
Norway. Is there any record existing which 
would give me the genealogy complete of the 
Leiths (Aberdeenshire) ? EDWARD TYRRELL. 

MAILLARD : SERMONES. There is a volume of 
Sermones by Maiilard, De Sanctis, anno 1507, 
printed by Johan Petit, 8vo, extending to fol. 
]51 ; then a Sermo, unpaged, two sheets, signed 
A. and B. After this, Sermones de Adventu, 116 
folios. I have not found any account of this 
volume or of the Sermones in any bibliographical 
work to which I have access. Brunet's earlier 
editions say nothing about it, nor does Greswell 
in his Annals of Parisian Typography. 

. IOTA RHO. 



OLD CHINA. Can any of your readers tell me 
where " New Hall " China was made. I have 
some specimens which are marked " New Hall," 
but cannot tell the locality to which they belong ? 

I shall also be glad to know something about 
the locality where earthenware dishes and plates 
of remarkably good and even elegant design, 
marked " Stephan," with an anchor in blue, and 
also with an impressed anchor, were made. I am 
glad to see that your correspondent, MR. LLEW- 
ELLYNN JEWITT, F.S.A., is writing the histories 
of all the old China works of England in the Art 
Journal. Perhaps he, or some other of your 
readers, will kindly answer these queries. 

W. LONGDEN. 



RICHARD, KING OF THE ROMANS. The Gen- 
tleman 's Magazine for January, 1860, contains a 
very good paper on " Richard, Earl of Cornwall, 
and King of the Romans," second son of King 
John. A descendant of this sovereign (through 
a female branch) wishes to recover his portrait. 
Can any of your readers tell him where it is to be 
found ? NANFANT. 

SAXIA, OR SASSIA, IN ROME. On several of 
my impressions of mediaeval seals, the words 
"Saxia," or " Sassia deUrbe" occurs ; and I shall 
feel obliged by information on the locality in the 
city of Rome to which this expression refers. 

M. D. 

* Date unknown, possibly the son. 
t Grose, Antiquarian Repertory. 



REV. CHARLES SWAN, pensioner of Catharine 
Hall 1817 and 1818, or thereabouts, left the 
University without a degree, but obtained Holy 
Orders ; and was at one time chaplain of the 
"Cambrian." He published various works be- 
tween 1822 and 1830; the last being a Sermon, 
preached in the chapel of Dulwich College. As 
we have been unable to find any subsequent 
notice of him, we conclude that he is dead. Any 
information respecting him will be acceptable. 

C. H. & THOMPSON COOPER. 
Cambridge. 

" SUNDAY, A POEM." Can any reader tell me 
who is the author of 

" Sunday ; a Poem in Defence of the Reasonable En- 
joyments and Recreations of the Toiling Classes of Lon- 
don on the Sabbath Day. By a Friend to Humanity," 
Small 8vo, pp. 73. Calais, 1837 ? 

The author, it will be seen, takes the popular 
side of a question now on the tapis ; and has a 
long preface upon the an ti- episcopal views he 
entertains. J. O. 

SODA WATER. When was this beverage first 
introduced ? I find it mentioned, not at all as a 
novelty, in a book (Sketches of Character), the 
second edition of which was published in 1813. 
It must, therefore, be at least fifty years old ; yet 
I have never seen it noticed in any work of the 
last century. It is, I believe, exclusively an 
English drink. I never met with it on the Con- 
tinent except in shops professedly selling English 
articles. Foreigners substitute Seltzer water. 

Is there any natural spring existing which soda 
water is meant to imitate ? 

What is aerated water, which I see stamped 
on many bottles resembling in shape and appear- 
ance soda-water bottles ? STYLITES. 

PORTRAIT OF SEGNERJ. Some months ago I 
purchased an old painting which was placed out- 
side a small^broker's shop in an obscure part of 
London. 

Notwithstanding its dirty appearance and its 
want of a frame, it struck me as possessing con- 
siderable merit. On taking it home I found 
written on the back, " Rittratto di Paolo Segneri, 
Filosofo, Murillo." I therefore concluded at once 
that it must be a copy of a Murillo, as I could 
not imagine for one moment that I had the good 
fortune to come across a Murillo. 

But I wished also to be certain that it was a 
portrait of the celebrated Father Paul Segneri, 
and I went therefore to Mr. Evans, the printseller 
in the Strand, and bought three prints repre- 
senting Segneri at various periods of his life. I 
also went to the Print Room of the British Mu- 
seum, but only saw one print of the same name. 
Still, although not one of the prints had been 
engraved from the painting I possessed, yet the 
likeness between the prints and the painting was 



132 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



C3*d S. III. FEB. 14, '63. 



such as to leave no doubt of its being a portrait 
of Segneri. Satisfied on this point, I next tried 
to ascertain whether Muriilo had ever painted a 
portrait of Segneri. But as Muriilo never left 
Spain, and Segneri, though a great missionary, 
and going from place to place, never visited 
Spain, no portrait by Muriilo could well exist. 

The picture has been framed and very care- 
fully restored, and any one can see it by calling 
at Mr. Candler's shop, 4, Sussex Terrace, West- 
bourne Grove, Bayswater. My own belief is, that 
the portrait was painted by Carlo Maratti. Seg- 
neri was born 1624, died 1694; Maratti, 1625; 
died 1713. In 1692 Innocent XII. raised Seg- 
neri to the office of preacher in the Apostolic 
College at Rome ; and as Maratti lived at Rome 
at the same time, and painted the portraits of 
many cardinals and ecclesiastics, it is only reason- 
able to suppose that so celebrated a man as Seg- 
neri would not have been omitted by Maratti. 
Any information that your readers can give will 
be most welcome. E. H. B. 

" Tu ES GUSTOS." I submit the undermen- 
tioned difficulty for the consideration of literati, 
in the hope that " N. & Q." may convey it to 
some collegiate institution where this disciplina 
arcani is understood, if not practised, to this day : 
for, like Depositio, it probably prevailed in Prae- 
Reformation times in many of the Continental 
Schools. 

" In the hall of the college of Westminster,' when the 
boys are at dinner, it is, ex officio, the place of the second 
boy, in the second election, to keep order among the two 
under elections ; and if any word, after he has ordered 
silence, be spoken, except in Latin, he says to the speaker 
Tu es Gustos ;' and this term passes from the second 
speaker to the third, or more, till dinner is over. Who- 
ever is then custos has an imposition. 

" It is highly probable (adds the very respectable gen- 
tleman to whom I am indebted for this information), that 
there had formerly been a tessera, or symbolum, delivered 
from boy to boy, as at some French schools now ; and 
that custos meant custos tessera;, symboli, &c. ; but at West- 
minster, the symbol is totally unknown at present." 
MALOKE. (From Dryden's Works, by Scott, vol. xviii. 
p. 98. 

BlBLIOTHECAE. CHETHAM. 

THIRD AFTER EPIPHANY, 1863. The Benedic- 
tine Almanack (London, Richardson & Son), gives 
the Church Order for to-day, as follows : 

" 25. Sund. 3rd after Epiphany gr. d. green. In ves- 
pers com. of fol." 

Omitting all mention of the Conversion of St. 
Paul. 

The Catholic Directory (London, Burns & Lam- 
bert), as well as Batter sby's Catholic Directory 
(Dublin, Mullany), gives S. Paul, after naming 
the Sunday. 

Why does the Benedictine defer S. Paul to 
February 21 ? Q. 



UNIVERSITY REGISTERS. A person took his 
bachelor's degree at Cambridge, 1622 ; and was 
admitted Master of Arts, 1626 (was a pensioner 
at Trinity College there). I am anxious to ascer- 
tain his residence, or that of his father. Will the 
University books give that information, and to 
whom should I apply for it ? The dates are on 
the authority of the Rev. Mr. Hubbard of Em- 
manuel, Register of the University, somewhere 
about the middle of the last century. CHEVRON. 

ZUCCARELLI AND WlLSON. Who HOW pOSSBSSCS 

the painting by Zuccarelli, " Macbeth and the 
Witches," which was engraved by Woollett from 
the original picture then in the possession of one 
Wm. Lock, Esq. ? And who engraved a picture 
after Richard Wilson, " The Death of Adonis," 
and who has the original or a repetition ? H. B. 



WILLIAM DORRINGTON. " Letters and De- 
spatches relating to the taking of the Earl of Or- 
mond, by O'More, A.D. 1600. Edited by the Rev. 
J. Graves." In a weekly publication in which the 
above work is noticed, there is the following quo- 
tation : 

" They who are so apt to lay this accident as an impu- 
tation to my government, may as well tax the Mayor of 
London because Dorrington brake his own neck "from 
the Steeple of St. Pulcher's." 

This must allude to some previous story. Can 
any of your readers inform me what it is ? 

A MEMBER OF THE UNIVERSITY CLUB. 

[Cole has the following notice of this lamentable oc- 
currence, Addit. MS. 5815, p. 137: 

" In a MS. lent me by my good friend Mr. Thomas 
Martin of Palgrave, in Suffolk, is a copy of a letter 
wrote by William Dorrington, Esq., sealed "and left with 
his staff upon the top of the steeple of St. Sepulchre's 
church, in London, 10 April, 1600, the same day that he 
cast himself headlong from the same, having the next 
day a cause to have been heard against him in the Star 
Chamber. The letter is as follows : 

" ' O let me live, and I will call upon Thy name.' 

" Let noe other bodie be troubled for that which is 
my owne facte. John Buncley and his fellowes, by 
perjurie and other bad meanes have brought me to this 
ende. God forgive it them as I doe. And, O Lord, 
forgive me this cruel facte upon my owne body, which I 
utterlie detest, and humbly praied to cast it behinde him, 
and that of his moste exceedinge and infinite mercie he 
will forgive it me, with all my other sinnes. But surelie 
after that they had thus slandered me, every day that I 
lived was to me an hundred deaths, which caused me to 
chuse rather to die with infamie, than to live, with in- 
famie and tormente. 

' O summa Deitas, quse Caalis et Inferis 
Presides, e mediis medere miseris, 
"Ut spretis Inferis, ltar Superis, 

lieatis dona veniam. 



3'* S. III. FEB. 14, '63.]', 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



133 



Trusting in the only passion and merits of Jesus Christe 
and confessinge my exceedinge greate sinnes, I said, Jesu, 
Master, have mercy on me. 

The unhappie Willm. Dorington, th' elder.' " 
In The Royall Legacies of Charles I. to his Persecutors 
and Murderers, 4to, 1649, this painful event is also al- 
luded to at p. 74: " How many presidents have we of 
iudgements which hunt and pursue Impropriators, and 
such as divest the Church of her sacred dedication ? Were 
there no more than that upon the family of Sir William 
Dodington (sic) of Hampshire, a family of a civil govern- 
ment, yet as heavily plagued as any before it : one, and 
a father of them, brake his own neck from the church of 
St. Sepulchre, in London : the lady of Sir William, a 
most virtuous woman, received fifteen wounds into her 
body from the hand and sword of her own son : the son, 
for this horrible matricide, was hanged in sight of the 
house where he was untimely born : one of Sir William's 
brothers, and a most virtuous gentleman, is now (if 
living, and hath been these! many years) blind. These 
pursuits of vengeance, and many more better known to 
others, have followed that family of honour and virtue, 
and by observation the like have continued upon it from 
the time some one of that house greedily enriched him- 
self with those matchless Church robberies of King 
Henry VIII. Insomuch as this virtuous Sir William hath 
even undone himself, by returning almost his whole 
estate (consisting of such revenues) to the Church, from 
whence it was stolen, though not by himself."! 

WILLIAM TYNDALE. Will " N. & Q." be good 
enough to inform me whether William Tyndale, a 
translator of the Holy Scriptures, was a laymanfor. 
cleric ? The presumption, looking at time and 
circumstances, would be that he was in ecclesias- 
tical orders of some degree. At Oxford he was 
a teacher, lecturer, possibly member of the go- 
verning body of Magdalen Hall, adjoining Mag- 
dalen College, and was after 1519 tutor and 
chaplain in the family of Sir John Walsh of 
Little Sodbury Manor, Gloucestershire. Here he 
preached and expounded Scripture, both at home 
and in the adjoining towns : yet his preaching was 
not complained of by the church dignitaries of 
the neighbourhood, but that he preached heresy. 
A.11 this would seem to imply some authority to 
teach. Was he in deacon's or any other clerical 
orders ? And will "1ST. & Q." render the answers 
certain by giving authorities ? A. B. C. 

[Mr. George Offor, in his Life of William Tyndale, pre- 
axed to the reprint of The New Testament of 1526, states 
it p. 7, that " the ordination of William Tyndale took 
}lace at the conventual church of the priory of St. Bar- 
;holomew in Smithfield, on the eleventh day of March, 
1502, by Thomas, suffragan Bishop of Pavaden, by au- 
.hority of William Warham, Bishop of London, and was 
>rdained priest to the nunnery of Lambley, in the diocese 
)f Carlisle. He took the vows, and became a friar in the 
iiaonastery at Greenwich in 1508." Mr. Offor farther 
idds: "We are indebted to the Rev. R. H. Barbara, of 
St. Paul's, for the discovery of a memorandum in Latin, 
peculiarly interesting in tracing the history of Tyndale. 
It is on the title-page of the Sermones de Herolt, a small 
oho, printed in the year 1495, in the cathedral library : 
'Charitably pray for the soul of John Tyndale, who gave 
:ms book to the monastery of Greenwich of the observ- 
ance of the minor brothers, on the day that brother 
William, his son, made his profession, in the year 1508." 



Mr. Offor informs us in a private letter, that the ordina- 
tion of Wm. Tyndale is also stated on Herolt's Sermons 
in St. Paul's library.] 

CON-TEMPORARY. Is this word in general par- 
lance pronounced as spelt, or as if written with 
the omission of the first n ? Dictionaries differ 
on this subject, and I should be glad if any of 
your readers could give some authority to quote 
from. S. A. W. 

Foo-chow-foo, China. 

^ [See "N. & Q." lt S. xii. 102, 415. The Latin, Ita- 
lian, Portuguese, Spanish, and French all retain the n. 
The word, like many others of Latin origin, may possibly 
have passed into our own language from the French ; and 
as the French, in pronouncing, slur the n, this may be 
one reason why the n is occasionally dropped in English. 
Ogilvie says " For the sake of easier pronunciation and 
a more agreeable sound, this word [contemporary] is 
often changed to cotemporary, and this is the preferable 
word." So Webster. Wright only says " Contemporary 
is of more general use." 

In regard both to the spelling and pronounciation of 
the word there is a difference as well in practice as in 
opinion. The question is one on which we cannot pre- 
tend to adjudicate; nor are we aware of any supreme 
authority.] 

" CHRONICLES or CARTAPHILUS." Can you give 
me any information concerning a book published 
in London, by Thomas Bosworth, 215, Regent 
Street, called the 

" Chronicles selected from the Originals of Cartaphilus, 
the Wandering Jew ; embracing a period of nearly xix 
Centuries. Now first revealed to, and edited by, David 
Hoffman, Hon. J. V. D. of Gottingen. 1853 ? " 

It is in six large volumes. All my endeavours 
hitherto to find a review of the book have proved 
fruitless; and what I now desire to know, is, 
what trust may be placed in the truthfulness of 
this remarkable history ? HATTON TURNEB. 

Rifle Brigade, Winchester. 

[A notice of this curious performance will be found in 
The Athenaum of October 15, 1853, p. 1215. The im- 
pression of the reviewer is, " that the story of the Wan- 
dering Jew has been selected by Mr. Hoffman as a con- 
venient allegory, or narrative machinery, for the putting 
forth of the rather chaotic contents of his own mind, 
including both his philosophy and his learning."] 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Who was the author of 
a work, entitled The Difference between Words 
esteemed Synonyms in the English Language, 8fC. t 
2vols. 12mo, Dublin, 1766? It is, if I mistake 
not, a reprint of an English publication, which 
bad probably appeared some years before, as 
" London, May 21, 1766," may be found at the 
end of the dedication to Philip, Earl Stanhope. 

ABHBA. 

[This work is by that universal genius and wholesale 
dealer in compilations, Dr. John Trusler, whose extended 
'ist of manufactured productions, some of them exceed- 

ngly curious, may be seen in Watt's Bibliotheca Britan- 
nica. The work noticed by our correspondent first ap- 

aeared anonymously in 2 vols. 12mo, 1766 : see notices 
of it in Gent. Mag., xxxvi. 288, and Monthly Eeview, 



134 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



III. FEE. 14, '63. 



xxxv. 150. A second edition, -with the author's name, 
was published in 1783. This edition, we are told, was 
" improved by expunging such distinctions between 
words, as on a more attentive examination appeared to 
the author to be trifling, and by many respectable addi- 
tions and amendments." Trusler's compilations appear 
to have been profitable speculations, for he purchased an 
estate at Englefield Green in Middlesex. He died in 
1820 at the ripe age of eighty-five. His Memoirs are 
noticed in our 1" S. iii. 61, 110.] 

RBV. THOMAS WESTLEY. My copy of Walker's 
Sufferings of the Clergy, fol. 1714, has the fol- 
lowing memoranda on its title-page : 

" The Gift of the Rev d . Mr. Thos. Westley to W m . 
Marchant, Aprill, 1724." 

" The Gift of M 1 '. Marchant to John Coles." 

I am anxious to know who the " Rev d . M r . 
Thos. Westley " was. EDWAED PEACOCK. 

[There was a Rev. Thomas Westley, Prebendary of 
Bath and Wells between 1723 and 1742. (Le Neve's 
Eccks. Anglicance, i. 189, ed. 1854.) This Mr. Westley 
was also Rector of Berkley in Somersetshire : his death is 
announced In the London Magazine of 1742, p. 309.] 



ANCIENT LAND TENURES. 
(3 rd S. iii. 28.) 

The editor's reply to the Query of H. G., under 
this head, and reference to Mr. Morgan's book, 
has recalled my attention, and induced me to 
direct the notice of readers of " N. & Q." to a 
collateral inquiry, which I instituted four years 
ago, as to the reason why the divisions between 
the strips of land, of which the old common fields 
were composed, and consequently the strips them- 
selves, were invariably more or less curved. 
(2 nd S. vii. 373 ; viii. 19, 32.) 

The valuable quotation given by ME. RILEY 
(to whom I take this opportunity of expressing 
my obligation) from the treatise De Housebondria 
although very nearly touching the subject, does 
not quite meet the question, and I am sure that it 
does not warrant the inference he draws from it, 
for it is impossible that a strip of land, 40 perches 
in length by 4 perches in breadth, can be ploughed 
round and round so as to end in the centre. I 
believe that by " xxxiii feetz entour " is meant 
33 times up and down, that is, the plough turned 
round as many times at each end. And no 
" rounding of corners " would give to each of the 
several strips, into which an old common field was 
divided, a precisely uniform shape, which form, 
permit me to repeat, is not the regular arc of a 
circle, but a line curving towards one end, in 
some instances recurved. Travelling last summer 
through the county of Worcester, I observed 
that although there were no mire-balks in exist- 
ence, the line of ploughing in large inclosures 
followed exactly the same curve as it did before 
the obliteration of the old divisions. 



The suggestion which L. M. N. was so kind as 
to make, derived from ancient Etruscan practice, 
I consider on the same grounds equally untenable. 
The peculiar form of these divisions is not Etrus- 
can, but Teutonic ; and I am informed that in 
the north of Germany the system of common 
fields divided into strips of Jand by mire-balks 
still prevails. 

I have in my possession a Field-book of a 
parish in this county (in the time of James L), in 
which an account is given of every common field, 
of the furlongs into which each is divided, and 
of the quantity and ownership of each of the lands 
(as the strips are provincially called), into which 
each furlong is subdivided. I believe that these 
fields, furlongs, and strips will be found to answer 
to the carucela, the quarentina, and the acra of 
Domesday Book, and that neither the one nor the 
other represented a definite quantity of land. 
But, as L. M. N., justly remarked, " the whole 
archaeology of the subject is too important and 
interesting to be passed over thus superficially," 
and I venture to express a hope that an archae- 
ologist will yet be found willing and able to take 
up the subject, and track it to its origin. 

G. A. C. 



HACKNEY. 
(3 rd S. iii. 95.) 

I think I can be of some slight assistance to A. A. 
in his search. In Elizabethan times, hackney ap- 
pears to have been generally used in the sense of 
" hired." In Lyly's Mother Bombie, the letter-out 
of horses is called a hackney-man, and the word is 
so used in Florio's Second Fruits, ch. iii., and in 
Act IV. Sc. 1 of Mother Bombie, Dromio likens 
" schollers to hacknies, because he knew two hired 
for ten groates a peece to say service on Sunday, 
and that's no more than a post horse from hence to 
Canterburie." Shakespeare also twice uses it in 
the same sense, but involved with the older sig- 
nification of common. The earliest reference I 
have seen to it in this sense is Piers Plowman, 
p. 96 (Halliwell's Diet} Haquenee, however, as 
used in French at the same time, never meant ^a 
hired horse, but only " an ambler." Thus in 
Cotgrave we have " Cheval de louage, a hack- 
ney ; " but " Hacquenee, an ambling horse, gel- 
ding, or mare;" smd in Sherwood (1660) we 
have under " horse " and " amble " " An ambling 
horse, hacquenee ; " and under " horse " and 
" hackney," U A hackney, cheval de louage? 
Again, in French, hacquenee stands alone, the 
words for ambling and hiring being quite dif- 
ferent, and the only word that I know. of appa- 
rently the same ro'ot is hacquet, a carter dray. 
Lastly, in older English, in the quotation from 
Chaucer, hackney is used as roucin, an ordinary 




14,63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



135 



horse of service or roadster ; and in the Prompt. 
Parv. (1440), Hakeney is Latinised by *' bajalus" 
portator, and sometimes a servant (compare 
" bajulona, lectus qui in itinere bajulatur "), and 
by "equiferus" a bad or unbroken horse, or 
" caballus agrestis." Du Cange. 

Hence, from both French and English, it may 
be inferred that hackney was the common cart or 
farm horse, or horse of all work, and as their use 
extended, the common roadster. The amble, 
however, being the easiest journey pace, especi- 
ally for wives of Bath, cockney John Gilpins, et 
hoc genus omne unaccustomed to riding, and very 
few of whom would like the jolting for any dis- 
tance of the " right butterwornan's pace to mar- 
ket'," so I conceive that in French hacquenee 
came to signify a horse of this pace. Thus Florio 
in ch. iii. both of his First and Second Fruits, says 
that the hire " is a shilling a day for a horse that 
can amble (and is caparisoned)." In England, 
again, I think that the rise of hackneymen and the 
important accident of paying for their " hakeneys" 
caused a corresponding change in the significa- 
tion. 

If the " roussin " which, as a " horse of ser- 
vice or arms," was due once in their lifetime by 
(French) vassals of holdings often pounds a year 
to their lord, was in other places called a hackney, 
we should have an intermediate link between the 
" caballus agrestis " and the ambling road pacer. 
Are there any passages to show that hackney in 
Engli.sh had in early times the meaning of hac- 
quenee.? .From Rymer, 1. vii. p. 27, Du Gauge 
quotes " Hakenius, equus tolutarius, gradarius. 
Gallice Haquenee ; Mandatum Ed. III. Reo-. 
Angl. 1373." N. B? 



I trust that the accompanying extract from 
Le Dictionnaire Etymologique of Menage (Paris, 
1690), will be found satisfactory and conclusive, 
so far as regards the derivation of the French 
haquenee. You will observe that my philologist 
alludes to a claim set up by the Flemings and Eng- 
lish to priority over the French in the possession 
)f hackeney, hacney ; but I hold, as I have always 
lone, to the Latin etymon, and say ditto to Messire 
Menage : 

" Haquenee aspire Lat. Equus gradarius. M. dc Case- 
icuve (voyez sa note: elle est curieuse) le derive 
Vanakanc mot Tiois, signifiant incedere, ambulare. D'autres 
e derivent du Flamaiid Hackeney ou de 1'Anglais 
lacney. Mais, c'est au contraire le Flamand hackeney 

: I Anglais hacney qui viennent du FranQais haquenee, et le 
iM-an^ais liaquenw vient du Latin-barbare hackinea, forme 
( EQiius'dans cette maniere :Eguus,akvs,akineus,akinea, 
lackmea, haquenee. Au lieu d'akinea, on a dit kinea, par 
ipherese, d'ou 1'Italien cJiinea :D'Akus on fait le dimi- 
lutif akettus, dont nous avons fait haquet, qui se tronve 
lans nos vieux auteurs pour un petit cheval, far*cw Co- 
luillard, dans le Monologue du Puis ' dit 



1 Sus, sus, allez vite en jaquet, 
Et pe(a)nsez le petit haquet, 
Et luy iaites bien la litiere.' 

Nous avona fait de meme hague de Haca. Les Arragonois, 
selon le teiiioignage de Nicot, au lieu de haca disent faca 
par le changement ordinaire de YH en F" 

There is also a very old French proverb : " Vin 
qui est ; clerc qui sait ; Haque qui va." I have 
looked into Caseneuve, Origines de la Langue 
Franqoise (Paris, 1694), but find his note on 
haquenee less curious than hazy. The French 
verb embler (to amble), which is expressive of the 
pace of a hackney, is formed from ambulare ; and 
Caseneuve professes to have found in the glossary 
of " the Monk Keron " anakanc for ambulans. 
But what is the "Tiois" or "Tioian" language 
in which the said Keron was, it seems, a profi- 
cient ? More learned word-masters than I may 
be able to answer this query. 

A tiny paddock is opened from the main-meadow 
of discussion by Menage's allusion to the Teutonic 
languages. Remark that he spells the Flemish for 
an ambling horse with a k, and the English without 
one. Unless this erudite philologist was as care- 
less in his English orthography as the majority of 
his modern countrymen, the particular kind of 
horse in question was called in England, in the 
reign of William III., a hacney ; which at once 
abrogates the possibility of its having any thing to 
do with the village of Hackney. Still the word 
Hackney may have really come to us from Flan- 
ders ; and, note it well, Flanders horses have 
generally been the staple in horseflesh for hiring 
in this country. The coach-and-six was drawn 
by Flanders mares: those same animals, broken 
down, might well be found in the first hackney or 
hackeney coaches; and, at the present day, the 
hired long-tailed steeds in hearses and mourning 
coaches, are of umnistakeable Flemish origin, if 
not actually imported from the Low Countries. 

GEORGE AUGUSTUS SAIA. 
Reform Club. 

Furetiere, in his Dictionnaire Universel des mots 
Franqais, says that haquenee is derived from 
hakinea, the diminutive of haca, which is used in 
Spanish to signify hackney. Noel and Carpentier, in 
their Dictionnaire Etymologique (Paris, 1831), de- 
rive haquenee from the Latin equina. Haquet 
(from equus) seems to have been an earlier form, 
for a small horse, as appears from the following 
lines by Coquillart a French poet, who died about 
1490 : 

"Sus, sus, allez- vous- en, Jaquet, 
Et pansez le petit Itaguet, 
Et lui faites bien la litiere." 

Menage is said to have compiled an extensive 
article (which I have not seen) on the etymology 
of the word haquenee, and remarks that Caseneuve 
derives it from anakanc, a Greek word of Tios, 



136 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



[3*d S. III. FEB. 14, '63. 



signifying to walk, to take a walk. Others think 
that it comes from hackeney, a Flemish word, or 
from the English hackney. Menage, however, 
maintains that it is derived from the corrupted 
Latin word hahinea, equns. In the former word 
there seems some resemblance in the pronuncia- 
tion to the neighing of a horse. J. MACEAY. 



PALMERIN OF ENGLAND. 

(3 rd S. Hi. 65.) 

In " N. & Q." p. 65, MR. COLLIER has a note 
upon the early editions of Palmerin of England, 
in reference to an entry in the " Registers of the 
Stationers' Company," " of the Thirde Booke . . . 
to be printed in Englishe," 1594. MR. C. states 
that he knew of no earlier impression than that of 
1602, by A.M. : a second part was printed 1609, 
and the two parts republished in 1639 by B. 
Alsop and T. Fawcet. Bohn has the same state- 
ment with further particulars and the following 
paragraph : 

"The third and last part of Palmerin of England (i. e. 
Palmerin d'Olivia) translated into English by Anthony 
Munday. Lond. 1602. Black Letter." 

I have now before me a 4to volume, black 
letter, in a limp parchment cover, the title wanting, 
"Epistle to the Right Worshipful and his ap- 
proved Good friend Maister Frances Young of 
Brent-Pelham, in the County of Hertford, Esquire, 
and to the most kind Gentlewoman and my mis- 
tresse, Susan Young, his loving wife," &c. signed 
A. Munday, 2 pages. To the Ladies and Gentle- 
women of England, signed A. M., 1 page, signa- 
ture A 4. In Lucubrationes A. M. Epigramma 
R. W., 1 page. The First Part of the no less 
Rare than Excellent and Stately History of the 
Famous and Fortunate Prince Palmerin of Eng- 
land. Finis. Signature rf concluding with 
Munday's apology for imperfections and promise 
of the Second Part, the Title of which follows, as 
before given, " and Florian du Desert his brother, 
&c. &c. Translated out of French by A. M., one 
of the Messengers of her Majesties Chamber. 
Petere out abstine. London. Printed by Thomas 
Creede and Bernard Alsop, 1616." There is 
another Epistle Dedicatorie to Maister Francis 
Young of Brent-Pelham, and Mistresse Susan 
Young, and Address to the Reader, promising 
the Third Part. The book ends at F f 4 with 
another address to the Courteous Reader, and a 
promise, " after I have ended the third part of 
this worthie Historie," to give them Palmerin 
d'Olivie, in three parts, and Primaleon of Greece." 
A Table of the Chapters finishes the Volume. 

What is the solution of the discrepancies be- 
tween this copy and the notices of MR. COLLIER 
and Mr. Bohn ? IOTA RHO. 



" HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW" (3 rd S. iii. 80, 97.) 
Permit me, as a Roman Catholic layman, to say a 
word or two in reply to the Rev. F. C. HUSEN- 
BETH'S remarks concerning The Home and Foreign 
Review. 

Your notice (p. 80) was as accurate as it could 
be under the circumstances in which literature at 
present exists in our body. The Roman Catho- 
lics of Great Britain have no organ in the same 
sense that many other political and religious 
bodies have. Our periodical press, so far from 
representing the feelings and hopes of the more 
thoughtful and learned among us, has too often 
done what it could to discourage thought and 
learning. The Home and Foreign Review was 
established a short time ago for the purpose of 
furnishing educated Roman Catholics with a peri- 
odical that would in some degree represent their 
views, and of whose style and literary culture they 
need not be ashamed. It has fully succeeded in 
doing this. Though I differ from its writers in 
some important particulars, I am bound to say 
that in high moral tone, religious instincts, and 
range of thought, it is far superior to any other 
Roman Catholic periodical that has been hitherto 
published in this country. 

The condemnations which certain bishops and 
other persons have thought fit to publish against 
the Home and Foreign Review, are, as your readers 
are, I hope, aware, utterly unimportant. There is 
no censorship of the press in England. Literary 
criticisms appearing in a pastoral have the same 
weight as if they were printed in a magazine ; 
just so much, and no more. EDWARD PEACOCK. 

Bottesford Manor, Brigg. 

THE CANONS or 1640 (3 rd S. iii. 25, 59.) These 
canons are very common. I have several copies in 
different volumes of tracts. In any considerable 
collection of tracts of the period the Canons of 
1640 are sure to be found. They were not re- 
printed until they appeared in Sparrow's Collec- 
tion. T. L. 

ARTHUR O'CONNOR (3 rd S.ii. 349.) Some weeks 
ago there was an inquiry relative to Arthur 
O'Connor. He was accustomed to talk of pre- 
paring an account of his life for the press ; and 
occasionally he sat down to the task of examining 
his papers. He expressed his intention very deci- 
dedly to me ; but the scheme was never counte- 
nanced by his wife and his eldest son. I knew 
Madame O'Connor; she was the only child ol 
Condorcet. Madame O'Connor died about four 
years ago ; the two sons died before their mother 
The elder son left a widow and two sons, who 
now reside on the estate at Bignon. AFFINIS. 

RATS' BONES IN SEPULCHRES (3 rd S. iii. 70.) 
I have just been reading Bateman's Ten Years 
Diggings in Celtic and Saxon Grave Hills, and 
could not fail to be struck with a fact so singular 



3* S. III. FEB. 14, '63.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



137 



as the frequent finding of rats' bones mingled with 
the bones of the person that had been interred. 
Frequently they occurred in great quantities. I 
was much disappointed, however, at not finding in 
this book any explanation as to how they got 
there. Did any superstition exist which suggested 
that rats were buried with the bodies ? It should 
seem not. From two or three passages, on which 
no particular stress is laid, it may be inferred that 
the rats had burrowed into the grave-hill for the 
purpose of preying upon the bodies ; that these 
grave-hills had been inhabited by rats in consider- 
able numbers, as rabbits inhabit a warren ; and 
that they had lived there, and finally died there. If 
this were really the case, the rats would have died 
for want of more food, as soon as they had picked 
the skeleton clean. I beg to suggest, that it would 
be well to make a close examination of skeletons 
found with the remains of these depredators, to 
see whether the marks of rats' teeth can be de- 
tected upon any of the bones. This might furnish 
a solution to the obscurity. The animal is called 
the water-vole, or rat. It must have been carni- 
vorous. I was once out with a friend who shot a 
water-rat as it was swimming across a pond. We 
opened the stomach and found it full of chick- 
weed. P. HUTCHINSON. 

THE ENGLISH APE, 1588 (3 rd S. iii. 65.) I am 
much obliged to MR. COLLIER for his prompt re- 
ply. In 1833 a copy of this remarkable tract was 
sold among Mr. Caldecott's books, but in the Ca- 
talogue it was described as the work of William 
Rowley. In a copy now before me, the initials 
W. R. at the end of the dedication to Sir C. Hat- 
ton, are also explained, in an old hand, to be 
W. Rowley, not W. Rankins. Notwithstanding 
these two circumstances, I quite concur with MR. 
COLLIER in thinking that the English Ape may be 
safely ascribed to the author of A Mirrour of 
Monsters. I beg to take this opportunity of point- 
ing out to MR. COLLIER a slight oversight com- 
mitted by him in his last instalment of " Extracts 
from the Registers of the Stationers' Company " 
" N. & Q.," 3 rd S. iii. 65, Pheander, the May den 
Knight, was printed by Thomas Creede, in 1595, 
4to, in pursuance o